Non-Fiction Catalogue: September 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in September 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or email your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $8.30
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.85
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

If your order is over $100, we recommend adding Australia Post insurance, which is charged at $2 per $100 of value.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

A Very Human Ending: How suicide haunts our species
Bering, Jesse
Why do people want to kill themselves? Despite the prevalence of suicide in the developed world, it’s a question most of us fail to ask. On hearing news of a suicide, we are devastated; but, overwhelmingly, we feel disbelief. In A Very Human Ending, research psychologist Jesse Bering lifts the lid on this taboo subject, examining the suicidal mindset from the inside out to reveal the subtle tricks the mind can play when we’re easy emotional prey. In raising challenging questions Bering tests our contradictory superstitions about the act itself. Combining cutting-edge research with investigative journalism and first-person testimony, Bering also addresses the history of suicide and its evolutionary inheritance to offer a personal, accessible, yet scientifically sound examination of why we are the only species on earth that deliberately ends its own life. This penetrating analysis aims to demystify a subject that knows no cultural or demographic boundaries.
Psychology | TP | $35.00

The Death of Hitler: The Final Word on the Ultimate Cold Case: The Search for Hitler s Body
Brisard, Jean-Christophe & Parshina, Lana
A dramatic and revelatory new account of the final days in Hitler’s bunker, based on new access to previously unseen Soviet archives. After two years of nonstop negotiations with the Russian authorities, Jean-Christophe Brisard and Lana Parshina were granted access to secret files detailing the Soviets’ incredible hunt to recover Hitler’s body: the layout of the bunker, plans for escaping, eyewitness accounts of the Fuhrer’s final days, and human remains – a bit of skull with traces of the lethal bullet and a fragment of jaw bone. For the first time, the skull, teeth and other elements were analysed by a medical examiner with modern equipment. The authors use these never before seen documents to reconstruct the events in fascinating new detail.
History | TP | $35.00

Bookshops
Carrion, Jorge
A journey around the world, by way of its best bookshops – the perfect present for book lovers. Why do bookshops matter? How do they filter our ideas and literature? In this inventive and highly entertaining extended essay, Jorge Carrion takes his reader on a journey around the world, via its bookshops. His travels take him to Shakespeare & Co in Paris, Wells in Winchester, Green Apple Books in San Francisco, Librairie des Colonnes in Tangier, the Strand Book Store in New York and provoke encounters with thinkers, poets, dreamers, revolutionaries, and readers. Bookshops is the travelogue of a lucid and curious observer, filled with anecdotes and stories from the universe of writing, publishing and selling books. A bookshop, in Carrion’s eyes, never just a place for material transaction; it is a meeting place for people and their ideas, a setting for world changing encounters, a space that can transform lives. Written in the midst of a worldwide recession, Bookshops examines the role of these spaces in today’s ever-shifting climate of globalisation, vanishing high streets, e-readers and Amazon. But far from taking a pessimistic view of the future of the physical bookshop, Carrion makes a compelling case for hope, underlining the importance of these places and the magic that can happen there. A vital manifesto for the future of the traditional bookshop, and a delight for all who love them.
Literary travelogue | PBK | $19.99

The Atom: The building block of everything
Challoner, Jack
Until now, popular science has relegated the atom to a supporting role in defining the different chemical elements of the periodic table. This bold new title places its subject centre stage, shining the spotlight directly onto the structure and properties of this tiniest amount of anything it is possible to identify. The book covers a huge range of topics, including the development of scientific thinking about the atom, the basic structure of the atom, how the interactions between atoms account for the familiar properties of everyday materials; the power and mystery of the atomic nucleus, and what the mysterious quantum realm of subatomic particles and their interactions can tell us about the very nature of reality. Sparkling text banishes an outdated world of dull chemistry, as it brightly introduces the reader to what everything is made of and how it all works, on the most fundamental level.
Science | HC | $39.99

The Truth About Tesla: The Myth of the Lone Genius in the History of Innovation
Cooper, Christopher
Are you positive that Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone? Are you sure the Wright Brothers were the first in flight? Think again! Everything you think you know about Nikola Tesla is wrong. Nikola Tesla was one of the greatest electrical inventors who ever lived. For years, the engineering genius was relegated to relative obscurity, his contributions to humanity (we are told) obscured by a number of nineteenth-century inventors and industrialists – who took credit for his work, or stole his patents outright. In recent years, the historical record has been ‘corrected’ and Tesla has been restored to his rightful place among historical luminaries like Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and Gugliemo Marconi. Most biographies repeat the familiar account of Tesla’s life, including his invention of alternating current, his falling out with Edison, how he lost billions in patent royalties to Westinghouse, and his fight to prove that Marconi stole 13 of his patents to ‘invent’ radio. But, what really happened? Consider this: Everything you think you know about Nikola Tesla is wrong. Newly-uncovered information proves that the popular account of Tesla’s life is itself very flawed. In The Truth About Tesla, Christopher Cooper sets out to prove that the conventional story not only oversimplifies history, it denies credit to some of the true inventors behind many of the ground-breaking technologies, now attributed to Tesla, and perpetuates a misunderstanding about the process of innovation, itself. With a provocative foreword by Tesla biographer Marc J Seifer, The Truth About Tesla is one of the first books to set the record straight, tracing the origin of some of the greatest electrical inventions to a coterie of colourful characters that conventional history has all but forgotten.
Science/History | PBK | $27.99

Letters to Change the World: From Pankhurst to Orwell
Elborough, Travis (editor)
In an era where the liberties, we often take for granted, are under threat, Letters To Change the World is a collection of inspiring letters offering reminders from history that standing up for and voicing our personal and political beliefs is not merely a crucial right but a duty if we want to change the world. Edited by Travis Elborough, the collection includes George Orwell’s warning on totalitarianism, Martin Luther King’s ‘Letter from a Birmingham Jail’, Albert Camus on the reasons to fight a war, Bertrand Russell on peace, Emmeline Pankhurst rallying her suffragettes, Nelson Mandela’s letter to his children from prison, and Time’s Up on the abuse of power.
History | HC | $32.99

Hello World: How to be Human in the Age of the Machine
Fry, Hannah
You are accused of a crime? Who would you rather decides your future – an algorithm or a human? Before making your decision, bear in mind that the algorithm will always be more consistent, and far less prone to an error of judgement. Then again, at least the human will be able to look you in the eye before determining your fate. How much fairness would you be willing to sacrifice for that human touch? This is just one of the dilemmas we face in the age of the algorithm, where the machine rules supreme, telling us what to watch, where to go, even who to send to prison. As increasingly we rely on them to automate big, important decisions – in crime, healthcare, transport, money – they raise questions that cut to the heart of what we want our society to look like, forcing us to decide what matters most. Is helping doctors to diagnose patients more or less important than preserving our anonymity? Should we prevent people from becoming victims of crime, or protect innocent people from being falsely accused? Hannah Fry takes us on a tour through the good, the bad, and the downright ugly of the algorithms that surround us. In Hello World, she lifts the lid on their inner workings, demonstrates their power, exposes their limitations, and examines whether they really are an improvement on the human systems they replace.
Society and culture/Technology | TP | $35.00

Spacecraft: 100 Iconic Rockets, Shuttles, and Satellites That Put Us in Space
Gorn, Michael H & De Chiara, Giuseppe (illustrator)
Spacecraft takes a long look at humankind’s attempts and advances in leaving Earth through incredible illustrations and authoritatively written profiles on Sputnik, the International Space Station, and beyond. In 1957, the world looked on with both uncertainty and amazement as the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the first manmade orbiter. Sputnik 1 would spend three months circling Earth every 98 minutes and covering 71 million miles in the process. The world’s space programs have travelled far (literally and figuratively) since then, and the spacecraft they have developed and deployed represent almost unthinkable advances for such a relatively short period. This ambitiously illustrated aerospace history profiles and depicts spacecraft from Sputnik 1 through the International Space Station, and everything in between, including concepts that have yet to actually venture outside the Earth’s atmosphere. Illustrator and aerospace professional Giuseppe De Chiara teams up with aerospace historian Michael Gorn to present a huge, profusely illustrated, and authoritatively written collection of profiles depicting and describing the design, development, and deployment of these manned and unmanned spacecraft. Satellites, capsules, spaceplanes, rockets, and space stations are illustrated in multiple views, sometimes cross-sectioned; and, in many cases, shown in archival period photography to provide further historical context. Dividing the book by era, De Chiara and Gorn feature spacecraft not only from the United States and Soviet Union/Russia, but also from the European Space Agency and China. The marvels examined in this volume include the rockets Energia, Falcon 9, and VEGA; the Hubble Space Telescope; the Cassini space probe; and the Mars rovers: Opportunity and Curiosity. Authoritatively written and profusely illustrated, with more than 200 stunning artworks, Spacecraft: 100 Iconic Rockets, Shuttles, and Satellites That Put Us in Space is sure to become a definitive guide to the history of manned space exploration.
Space exploration | HC | $39.99

Radical Technologies: The Design of Everyday Life
Greenfield, Adam
Everywhere we turn, a startling new device promises to transfigure our lives. But at what cost? In this urgent and revelatory excavation of our Information Age, leading technology thinker Adam Greenfield forces us to reconsider our relationship with the networked objects, services and spaces that define us. It is time to re-evaluate the Silicon Valley consensus determining the future. Having successfully colonised everyday life, radical technologies – from smartphones, blockchain, augmented-reality interfaces and virtual assistants to 3D printing, autonomous delivery drones and self-driving cars – are now conditioning the choices available to us in the years to come. How do they work? What challenges do they present to us, as individuals and societies? Who benefits from their adoption? In answering these questions, Greenfield’s timely guide clarifies the scale and nature of the crisis we now confront – and offers ways to reclaim our stake in the future.
Technology/Society and Culture | PBK | $19.99

21 Lessons for the 21st Century
Harari, Yuval Noah
Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present. How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children? Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues. The golden thread running through his exhilarating new book is the challenge of maintaining our collective and individual focus in the face of constant and disorienting change. Are we still capable of understanding the world we have created?
Society and culture/science/philosophy | TP | $35.00

Evolutions: 15 Myths That Explain Our World
Harman, Oren
We may no longer think that the world was hatched from an egg, as the ancient Chinese did, or that our fate is ruled by a capricious Zeus and a resentful Hera. We now use genes to explain desire, and physics to explain the mechanics of the universe and earthly disasters. But are we any the wiser? Has science provided protection from the fires of jealousy and love? Is there no room now for the comforts of mythology? Oren Harman creates grand modern myths and fables out of the materials of the latest science. The earth and moon present a cosmological view of motherhood, the loneliness of consciousness emerging from the memory of an octopus, the birth of language beginning humanity’s struggle with truth. Science may not heal our deepest confusions and impulses, but its magical discoveries can help us in our never-ending search for knowledge.
Science | TP | $35.00

Caesar’s Last Breath: The Epic Story of The Air Around Us
Kean, Sam
With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. On the ides of March, 44 BC, Julius Caesar died of stab wounds in the Roman Senate, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding. In fact, you’re probably inhaling some of it, now. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, some might also bear traces of Cleopatra’s perfumes, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, even remnants of stardust from the universe’s creation. In Caesar’s Last Breath, Sam Kean takes us on a journey through the periodic table, around the globe and across time – to tell the epic story of the air we breathe.
Science/History | PBK | $24.99

Dawn of the New Everything: A Journey Through Virtual Reality
Lanier, Jaron
Virtual Reality has long been one of the dominant clichés of science fiction. Now Virtual Reality is a reality: those big headsets that make people look ridiculous, even while radiating startled delight; the place where war veterans overcome PTSD, surgeries are trialled, aircraft and cities are designed. But VR is far more interesting than any single technology, however spectacular. It is, in fact, the most effective device ever invented for researching what a human being actually is – and how we think and feel. More than thirty years ago, legendary computer scientist, visionary and artist Jaron Lanier pioneered its invention. Here, in what is likely to be one of the most unusual books you ever read, he blends scientific investigation, philosophical thought experiment and his memoir of a life lived at the centre of digital innovation to explain what VR really is: the science of comprehensive illusion; the extension of the intimate magic of earliest childhood into adulthood; a hint of what life would be like without any limits. As Lanier shows, we are standing on the threshold of an entirely new realm of human creativity, expression, communication and experience. While we can use VR to test our relationship with reality, it will test us in return, for how we choose to use it will reveal who we truly are. Welcome to a mind-expanding, life-enhancing, world-changing adventure.
Virtual reality | PBK | $24.99

Unwell: What Makes a Disease a Disease?
McRae, Mike
In a world where illness seems to be everywhere, where does failing biology stop and personal responsibility begin? Nostalgia used to be a killer nervous condition. Emotional women were once treated with a good orgasm, left-handed folk were beaten to be turned ‘right’, and rotten teeth pulled to cure the mentally unwell. Just who made these diseases ‘diseases’ anyway? And what makes us think we understand any better, today? Unwell is a fascinating and insightful exploration of the ever-changing nature of illness. Using humour, historical anecdotes, scientific research and personal stories, McRae illuminates the power of disease and medical diagnoses to define who we are and how we live. In a time when extreme violence is blamed on poor mental health, when people suffer for want of health insurance, and research dollars depend on sharp marketing campaigns, understanding the social and cultural nature of disease is vital for our wellbeing – and the wellbeing of our community.
Science | TP | $29.95

Cracking the Elements: You, This Book and 350 Years of Scientific Discovery
Mileham, Rebecca
From the earliest-known elements to those named in 2016, this book takes a comprehensive look at the development of the periodic table – and reveals untold stories, unsung pioneers and plenty of fascinating science along the way. In twelve illustrated chapters, the book makes sense of the patterns and groups within the periodic table, introducing each of the 118 known elements individually and exploring questions including: Why did the history of fizzy water give early chemistry a sparkle? How did hydrogen reveal the structure of the atom? What was the Bunsen burner’s role in discovering new elements? Which of the alkaline earth metals accounts for a kilogram of your weight? Why is Marie Curie such a scientific star? How do tungsten and vanadium explain the secret of super-sharp Syrian swords? Who discovered the most elements in the periodic table? What made nihonium, element 113, such a wonderful new year’s gift for Japan? Is glass a liquid or a solid? How did nitrogen fulfil the alchemists’ dream? Would you have smeared antimony on your face if you’d lived in ancient Egypt? Why might naked mole rats have clues for surviving a heart attack? How did the Haya people of Tanzania make steel 1500 years ago? What makes xenon a great anaesthetic – and why can’t all patients use it? Might there be a pattern in yet undiscovered elements beyond number 118?
Science | HC | $26.99

The Death of the Gods: The New Global Power Grab
Miller, Carl
A ground-breaking examination of the new centres of power and control in the twenty-first century. The old gods are dying. Giant corporations collapse overnight. Newspapers are being swallowed. Stock prices plummet with a tweet. Governments are losing control. The old familiarities are tumbling down and a strange new social order is rising in their place. More crime now happens online, than offline. Facebook has grown bigger than any state, bots battle elections, technologists have reinvented democracy and information wars are breaking out around us. New mines produce crypto-currencies, coders write policy, and algorithms shape our lives in more ways than we can imagine. What is going on? For centuries, writers and thinkers have used power as a prism through which to view and understand the world at moments of seismic change. The Death of the Gods is an exploration of power in the digital age, and a journey in search of the new centres of control today. From a cyber-crime raid in suburbia to the engine rooms of Silicon Valley, and from the digital soldiers of Berkshire to the hackers of Las Vegas, pioneering technology researcher Carl Miller traces how power – the most important currency of all – is being transformed, fought over, won and lost. As power escapes from its old bonds, he shows us where it has gone, the shape it now takes and how it touches each of our lives. Astounding opportunities are at our fingertips. But are we more powerful as individuals than ever before? Or more controlled?
Society and culture/economics/politics | TP | $35.00

Odd Science: Inventions
Olstein, James
Inventions aren’t always easy. Sometimes, a humble leaf can get in the way. Developers have learned that one of the big hold-ups, in the creation of self-driving cars, is teaching the cars to recognise changes in foliage, as they drive the same routes each day. Scientists have developed a flexible medical sensor, using electrodes and regular chewing gum. Odd Science: Inventions is filled with weird and wacky facts that you’ve never heard before. Read about the trainers made of spider silk, wonder at the first record played in space, and tell your friends about the robot built in 1937. There are facts about electricity being used as glue, facts about glow-in-the-dark cats and facts about nano-robots that can ‘swim’ inside the body during biopsies! James Olstein beautifully illustrates these odd facts, and more, in a retro-inspired, quirky style. His designs aren’t meant to be taken literally, but you’ll laugh out loud – when you see a walking trash can and wind towers made of carrots! Prepare to laugh, marvel and learn. Being a geek has never been so cool.
Science-y stuff | HC | $19.99

The Plots Against Hitler
Orbach, Danny
A new and definitive account of the anti-Nazi underground in Germany and its numerous efforts to assassinate Adolf Hitler. In 1933, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. A year later, all parties but the Nazis had been outlawed, freedom of the press was but a memory, and Hitler’s dominance seemed complete. Yet, over the next few years, an unlikely clutch of conspirators emerged – soldiers, schoolteachers, politicians, diplomats, theologians, even a carpenter – who would try repeatedly to end the Fuhrer’s genocidal reign. Danny Orbach’s meticulously researched book tells the story of their noble, ingenious, and doomed efforts. This is history at its most suspenseful: we witness secret midnight meetings, crises of conscience, fierce debates among old friends about whether and how to dismantle Nazism, and the various plots themselves being devised and executed.
History | PBK | $22.99

The Book of Humans: The Story of How We Became Us
Rutherford, Adam
We like to think of ourselves as exceptional beings, but is there really anything special about us that sets us apart from other animals? Humans are the slightest of twigs on a single, family tree that encompasses four billion years, a lot of twists and turns, and a billion species. All of those organisms are rooted in a single origin, with a common code that underwrites our existence. This paradox – that our biology is indistinct from all life, yet we consider ourselves to be special – lies at the heart of who we are. In this original and entertaining tour of life on Earth, Adam Rutherford explores how many of the things once considered to be exclusively human are not: we are not the only species that communicates, makes tools, utilises fire, or has sex for reasons other than to make new versions of ourselves. Evolution has, however, allowed us to develop our culture to a level of complexity that outstrips any other observed in nature. The Book of Humans tells the story of how we became the creatures we are today, bestowed with the unique ability to investigate what makes us who we are. Illuminated by the latest scientific discoveries, it is a thrilling compendium of what unequivocally fixes us as animals, and reveals how we are extraordinary among them.
Science | TP | $32.99

Unnatural Causes: The Extraordinary Life and Career of Britain’s Foremost Forensic Pathologist
Shepherd, Dr Richard
‘The dead do not hide the truth and they never lie. Through me the dead can speak…’ Dr Richard Shepherd is the UK’s foremost forensic pathologist, his job to understand the deaths which may have no natural cause. From crime scene to court room, his findings are crucial to the pursuit of justice. His work has seen killers put behind bars, exonerated the innocent, and turned open and shut cases on their heads. Shepherd’s obsession with revealing the secrets of the dead is personal. At medical school, while performing his first autopsy, he held the heart of the patient in his hand and thought of his late mother, taken too early by heart disease. He became driven by the challenge of finding the truth, of seeing justice, and by compassion: sometimes for the dead, but always for those they have left behind. Thoughtful, revealing, chilling, sometimes bizarre and always unputdownable, Unnatural Causes is the true crime book of the year.
Science and medicine/True crime | TP | $34.99

Significant Figures: Lives and Works of Trailblazing Mathematicians
Stewart, Ian
Vivid accounts of the lives of 25 of the world’s greatest mathematicians with clear descriptions of their far-reaching discoveries. Which mathematician elaborated a crucial concept the night before he died in a duel? Who funded his maths and medical career through gambling and chess? Who learned maths from her wallpaper? Ian Stewart presents the extraordinary lives and amazing discoveries of twenty-five of history’s greatest mathematicians from Archimedes and Liu Hui to Benoit Mandelbrot and William Thurston. His subjects are the inspiring individuals, from all over the world, who have made crucial contributions to mathematics. They include the rediscovered geniuses Srinivasa Ramanujan and Emmy Noether, alongside the towering figures of Muhammad al-Khwarizmi (inventor of the algorithm), Pierre de Fermat, Isaac Newton, Carl Friedrich Gauss, Nikolai Ivanovich Lobachevsky, Bernhard Reimann (precursor to Einstein), Henri Poincar., Ada Lovelace (arguably, the first computer programmer), Kurt G.del, and Alan Turing. Ian Stewart’s vivid accounts are fascinating in themselves and, taken together, cohere into a riveting history of key steps in the development of mathematics.
Science/History | PBK | $22.99

Special Relativity and Classical Field Theory: The Theoretical Minimum
Susskind, Leonard & Friedman, Art
At last, waves, forces and particles will be demystified. Using their typical brand of relatively simple maths, enlightening sketches and the same fictional counterparts, Art and Lenny, Special Relativity and Classical Field Theory takes us on an enlightening journey through a world now governed by the laws of special relativity. Starting in their new watering hole, Hermann’s Hideaway, with a lesson on relativity, Art and Lenny walk us through the complexities of Einstein’s famous theory. Combining rigor with humour, Susskind and Friedman guarantee that Special Relativity and Classical Field Theory will become part of the reader’s physics toolbox.
Science | PBK | $22.99

The Physics Behind…
Swan, Russ
Can you really lose weight by consuming nothing but ice cream and beer? How does the latest blockbuster movie get squeezed onto a disk, and how do they make the pictures seem 3D? How much does a selfie weigh? What’s the science behind forensic investigations, body scans, and the dating of ancient artefacts? The Physics Behind… takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the scientific principles that that make the modern world work. Could there be life on Mars? Why is north really south? How do self-driving cars find their way around? These and many more topics are explored by starting with the basic science that makes them tick – examining the physics behind them. Packed with detailed original artwork and infographics, The Physics Behind… is perfect for anyone who has ever been curious about the science of life. Including: the physics behind modern life: Wi-Fi, Facial recognition, touchscreens, microwave ovens, the ice cream and beer diet, taking a selfie, Flash memory, a bag of sugar, catching the train, calendars and clocks; the physics behind entertainment: optical discs, lasers, white water, executive toys, the electric guitar, music, 3D movies; the physics behind analysis: medical imaging, looking at little things, spectroscopy, crime scene investigation, tricorder, microfluidics, radiocarbon dating, proving the Earth is round; the physics behind space: rocket science, space weather, Planet Nine, space telescopes, is there anybody out there? life on Earth, life on Mars; the physics behind big science: what’s the matter?, time travel, bomb or meltdown?, the Large Hadron Collider, the Human Genome Project, the Standard Model, gravity, everything; the physics behind the weird universe: strings, rings and other things, N-dimensional space, the hypercube, antimatter, the dark universe, quantum weirdness, quantum biology, time crystals and Majorana; the physics behind the environment: weather forecasts, climate change, renewable energy, migration, peacock feathers, sunburn, rainbows, spider silk; the physics behind transportation: autonomous autos, Hyperloop, Maglev, satellite navigation, motor sport, going rreeaallllyy fast, stealth; the physics behind everything else: curve balls, the Mpemba Effect, why north is really south, perpetual motion and the heat death of the universe, and the physics behind this book.
Science | PBK | $26.99

Cracking Neuroscience: You, This Book and the Mapping of the Mind
Turney, Jon
For so long, the brain was the great unknown of human biology; an evolved complex of cells, chemicals and electricity, which eluded even the understanding of its own grey matter. Now, in this comprehensive guide, the most complicated concepts from across the field of neuroscience – such as memory, addiction and mind mapping – are broken down into easily understandable bite-sized pieces, to give everyone the chance to understand their own brain. Includes sections on: the anatomy of the brain; neurons, synapses and axons – the building blocks of the brain; differences in male and female development; modern treatment of mental illness; the effects on the brain of different food and stimulants; memory, senses, cravings; fight or flight; perception and sensation; the future of neuroscience.
Science | HC | $26.99

The Secret Network of Nature: The Delicate Balance of All Living Things
Wohlleben, Peter
Did you know that trees can influence the rotation of the earth? Or that wolves can alter the course of a river? Or that earthworms control wild boar populations? The natural world is a web of intricate connections, many of which go unnoticed by humans. But it is these connections that maintain nature’s finely balanced equilibrium. Drawing on the latest scientific discoveries and decades of experience as a forester and bestselling author, Peter Wohlleben shows us how different animals, plants, rivers, rocks and weather systems cooperate, and what’s at stake when these delicate systems are unbalanced. The earth’s ecosystems are too complex for us to compartmentalise and draw up simple rules of cause and effect; but The Secret Network of Nature gives us a chance to marvel at the inner workings and unlikely partnerships of the natural world, where every entity has its own distinct purpose. And the more light that is shed on relationships between species, the more fascinating nature’s web becomes.
Natural history | TP | $29.99

12 Small Acts to Save Our World: Simple, Everyday Ways You Can Make a Difference
WWF
Ever wanted to save the world? It’s easy to feel like we can’t make a difference. But small, easy actions, if taken by enough people, can move mountains – and save planets. Written in collaboration with leading environmental experts from WWF, this short book provides simple changes we can all make to our everyday lives, from morning to night. These aren’t the only things you can do. Nor are they things you have to do. But these 12 small acts are basic steps anybody can take, and if even one of them sticks, our children will inherit a better world. Acts like: turning off devices instead of leaving them on standby; buying less cotton clothing (a t-shirt needs 2,400 litres of water to make!); using reusable straws, when possible; turning off the tap while you brush your teeth, will take only moments, but if enough people commit to them, we can make a real difference to our planet.
Conservation | HC | $29.99