Non-Fiction Catalogue: October 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in October 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $8.30
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.85
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

If your order is over $100, we recommend adding Australia Post insurance, which is charged at $2 per $100 of value.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

Exoplanets (Ladybird Expert)
Aderin-Pocock
Exoplanets is an accessible and authoritative introduction to the hunt for strange new worlds. Written by the celebrated space scientist Maggie Aderin-Pocock, Exoplanets illuminates how scientists are on the technological brink of answering the questions that have been asked for thousands of years: Are there other planets like Earth? Is there life on these planets? And are they common? Inside you’ll learn just how quickly our picture of the universe is changing. In the past 10 years, scientists have estimated about 40 billion potentially Earth-like planets that sit in the habitable zone of stars not dissimilar to our own. This book details not only how scientists are detecting these planets, but asks, if we came across life, would we even recognise it?
Science | HC | $19.99

Life on Earth (40th anniversary edition)
Attenborough, Sir David
David Attenborough’s meeting with gorillas was one of the most unforgettable moments for millions of television viewers. With Life on Earth, Attenborough created a book and TV series that became a benchmark of quality, influencing a generation of nature lovers. David Attenborough’s internationally acclaimed book of the series was a worldwide bestseller. Told through an examination of animal and plant life – with occasional juxtapositions of extinct fossil forms to reveal the origin of living creatures – Life on Earth is an astonishing celebration of the evolution of life on Earth, with a cast of characters drawn from the whole range of organisms that have ever lived on this planet. Attenborough’s perceptive, dynamic approach to the evolution of millions of species of living organisms that populate the planet takes the reader on an unforgettable journey of discovery from the very first spark of life to the blue and green wonder we know today. Now, to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the book’s first publication, David Attenborough has revised Life on Earth, updating and adding to the original text and choosing beautiful, completely new photography. This special anniversary edition provides a fitting tribute to an enduring wildlife classic. It will enthral the generation who saw it when first published; and will bring it alive for a whole new generation.
Natural history | HC | $49.99

Have You Eaten Grandma? Or, the lifesaving importance of correct punctuation, grammar and good English
Brandreth, Gyles
A hilarious lament on the misuse of English grammar from the self-proclaimed punctuation perfectionist Gyles Brandreth. It can be much harder than it seems; commas, colons, semi-colons and even apostrophes can drive us all mad at times, but it riles no one more than the longest-serving resident of Countdown’s Dictionary Corner, grammar guru Gyles Brandreth. In this brilliantly funny tirade and guide, Gyles anatomises the linguistic horrors of our times, tells us where we’ve been going wrong (and why) and shows us how, in future, we can get it right every time. Is ‘alright’ all right? You’ll find out right here. From dangling clauses to gerunds, you’ll also discover why Santa’s helpers are subordinate clauses. In Have You Eaten Grandma? he waxes lyrical about the importance of language as, after all, it is what we use to define ourselves and, ultimately, is what makes us human.
Language/Writing | HC | $29.99

Bubbles (Ladybird Expert)
Czerski, Helen
Bubbles is a clear, surprising and entertaining introduction to the science of bubbles. Bubbles are beautiful, ephemeral, fun, fragile, jolly and slightly unpredictable. We’re all familiar with them, but we don’t often ask what they actually are. The great scientists of the Western world – Robert Hooke, Isaac Newton, Lord Rayleigh and more – studied bubbles seriously. They recognised that they had a lot to say about the nature of the physical world, and they poked, prodded and listened to find out what it was. In the years since, we’ve learned that this bulbous arrangement of liquid and gas does things that neither the gas nor the liquid could do by itself. Written by the celebrated physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski, Bubbles explores how everything, from the way drinks taste to the Earth’s temperature, is influenced by bubbles. This book has a message: never underestimate a bubble!
Science | HC | $19.99

Europe: A Natural History
Flannery, Tim
It is hard to overstate just how unusual Europe was towards the end of the age of the dinosaurs. It was a dynamic island arc whose individual landmasses were made up of diverse geological types, including ancient continental fragments, raised segments of oceanic crust, and land newly minted by volcanic activity. Yet, even at this early stage Europe was exerting a disproportionate influence on the world. About 100 million years ago, the interaction of three continents – Asia, North America and Africa – formed the tropical island archipelago that would become the Europe of today, a place of exceptional diversity, rapid change and high energy. Europe: A Natural History is full of surprises. Over the millennia, Europe has received countless immigrant species and transformed them. It is where the first coral reefs formed. It was once home to some of the world’s largest elephants. And it played a vital role in the evolution of our own species. When the first modern humans arrived in Europe 40,000 years ago, they began to exert an astonishing influence on the continent’s flora and fauna, and now, Europeans lead the way in wildlife restoration – there are more wolves in Europe today than in the USA. This enthralling ecological history is more than the story of Europe and the Europeans, it will change our understanding of life itself.
History | TP | $34.99

The Future of War: a History
Freedman, Lawrence
Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defence? How might peace be preserved, or conflict resolved? From the French rout at Sedan in 1870 to the relentless contemporary insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan, Lawrence Freedman, one of the UK’s foremost military thinkers, reveals how those who have imagined future war have often had an idealised notion of it as confined, brief and decisive – hence the stubborn persistence of the idea of a knockout blow, whether through a dashing land offensive or nuclear first strike or cyberattacks. He also notes the lack of attention paid to civil wars until the West began to intervene in them during the 1990s and how the boundaries between peace and war, between the military, the civilian, and the criminal are becoming increasingly blurred. Freedman’s account of a century and a half of warfare and the (often misconceived) thinking that precedes war is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, and puts current strategic thinking into a bracing historical perspective.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

Wild Things: the Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult
Handy, Bruce
The dour New England Primer, thought to be the first American children’s book, was first published in Boston in 1690. Offering children gems of advice such as ‘Strive to learn’ and ‘Be not a dunce,’ it was no fun at all. So how did we get from there to ‘Let the wild rumpus start’? And now that we’re living in a golden age of children’s literature, what can adults get out of reading Where the Wild Things Are and Goodnight Moon, or Charlotte’s Web and Little House on the Prairie? A ‘delightful excursion’ (The Wall Street Journal), Wild Things revisits the classics of every American childhood, from fairy tales to The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and explores the back stories of their creators, using context and biography to understand how some of the most insightful, creative, and witty authors and illustrators of their times created their often deeply personal masterpieces. Along the way, Handy learns what The Cat in the Hat says about anarchy and absentee parenting, which themes are shared by The Runaway Bunny and Portnoy’s Complaint, and why Ramona Quimby is as true an American icon as Tom Sawyer, or Jay Gatsby. It’s a profound, eye-opening experience to re-encounter books that you once treasured, decades ago. A clear-eyed love letter to the greatest children’s books and authors from Louisa May Alcott and L Frank Baum to Eric Carle, Dr Seuss, Mildred D Taylor, and E B White, Wild Things is ‘a spirited, perceptive, and just outright funny account that will surely leave its readers with a new appreciation for childhood favourites’ (Publishers Weekly).
History of literature/Memoir | PBK | $24.99

Brief Answers to the Big Questions
Hawking, Stephen
The final book from Professor Stephen Hawking, the bestselling author of A Brief History of Time and, arguably, the most famous scientist of our age, Brief Answers to the Big Questions is a profound, accessible and timely reflection on the biggest questions in science. How did the universe begin? Will humanity survive on Earth? Is there intelligent life beyond our solar system? Could artificial intelligence ever outsmart us? Throughout his extraordinary career, Stephen Hawking expanded our understanding of the universe and unravelled some of its greatest mysteries. But even as his theoretical work on black holes, imaginary time and multiple histories took his mind to the furthest reaches of space, Hawking always believed that science could also be used to fix the problems on our planet. And, now, as we face potentially catastrophic changes here on Earth – from climate change to dwindling natural resources, to the threat of artificial super-intelligence – Stephen Hawking turns his attention to the most urgent issues for humankind. Wide ranging, intellectually stimulating, passionately argued, and infused with his characteristic humour, Brief Answers to the Big Questions, the final book from one of the greatest minds in history, is a personal view on the challenges we face as a human race, and where we, as a planet, are heading next.
Science | HC | $29.99

The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond
Kaku, Michio
Human civilisation is on the verge of spreading beyond Earth. More than a possibility, it is becoming a necessity: whether our hand is forced by climate change and resource depletion or whether future catastrophes compel us to abandon Earth, one day we will make our homes among the stars. World-renowned physicist and futurist Michio Kaku explores in rich, accessible detail how humanity might gradually develop a sustainable civilisation in outer space. With his trademark storytelling verve, Kaku shows us how science fiction is becoming reality: mind-boggling developments in robotics, nanotechnology, and biotechnology could enable us to build habitable cities on Mars; nearby stars might be reached by microscopic spaceships sailing through space on laser beams; and technology might one day allow us to transcend our physical bodies entirely. With irrepressible enthusiasm and wonder, Dr Kaku takes readers on a fascinating journey to a future in which humanity could finally fulfil its long-awaited destiny among the stars – and, perhaps, even achieve immortality.
Science/Future history | HC | $35.00

SAS: Italian Job – the Secret Mission to Storm a Forbidden Nazi Fortress
Lewis, Damien
In the hard-fought winter of 1944, the Allies advanced northwards through Italy, but stalled on the fearsome mountainous defences of the Gothic Line. Two men were parachuted in, in an effort to break the deadlock. Their mission: to penetrate deep into enemy territory and lay waste to the Germans’ impregnable headquarters. At the eleventh hour, mission commanders radioed for David ‘The Mad Piper’ Kilpatrick to be flown in, resplendent in his tartan kilt. They wanted this fearless war hero to lead the assault, piping Highland Laddie as he went – so, leaving an indelible British signature to deter Nazi reprisals. As the column of raiders formed up, there was shocking news. High command radioed through an order to stand down, having assessed the chances of success at little more than zero. But, in defiance of orders, and come hell or high water, they were going in.
Military history | TP | $32.99

Witchcraft (Ladybird Expert)
Lipscomb, Suzannah
Witchcraft is an accessible, authoritative and captivating introduction to the magical myths that have coloured the popular imagination for centuries. Written by celebrated historian and broadcaster Dr Suzannah Lipscomb, Witchcraft explores the moment in history when witches were perceived to be especially dangerous: the famous witch hunts between 1450 and 1750. You’ll learn how the figure of the witch remains culturally relevant. In horror films, TV shows and pop culture, the figure of the witch retains her potency to attract and repel. Witch hunts, in one form or another, have persisted for thousands of years. Understanding why people were and continue to be persecuted for witchcraft matters now, more than ever.
History/Religion/Folklore | HC | $19.99

Dominion: the Race to Save Earth
Lussier, Paul
At the current rate of carbon pollution, we are we are likely to see the first wave of global catastrophes as a result of carbon dioxide levels within the next twenty to twenty-five years. As a result, a group of scientists from around the world, backed by billionaires, oligarchs and dictators, are attempting to find other, more drastic solutions. The science of manipulating the earth’s climate (and nature itself) is known as ‘geoengineering’, and is looked to, by many, as the only way to save our planet. Current schemes include the creation of artificial sulphate clouds to cool the temperatures of regions; the dispersal of millions of tons of seawater into the atmosphere via aeroplane; and the sending of thousands of light-reflecting mirrors into space. All would, scientists claim, immediately lower the earth’s temperature, and slow (or stop) our current trajectory. But each also presents incalculable and possibly catastrophic risks. Dominion is the first exploration of the race to save the planet – providing an authoritative examination of the history, science and mechanics of the various geoengineering schemes, their possible implications, and the extraordinary cast of characters – scientists, entrepreneurs, despots, ecologists, politicians – involved. It also points to what might save us from destruction: a new era of cooperation, and possibly the next stage in our evolution as a species. Instructive, explosive and more urgent now than ever before, Dominion is an essential guide to our present and future, from one of the great scientific minds and communicators of this century.
Science/conservation | TP | $35.00

The Spy and the Traitor: the Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War
Macintyre, Ben
On a warm July evening in 1985, a middle-aged man stood on the pavement of a busy avenue in the heart of Moscow, holding a plastic carrier bag. In his grey suit and tie, he looked like any other Soviet citizen. The bag alone was mildly conspicuous, printed with the red logo of Safeway, the British supermarket. The man was a spy. A senior KGB officer, for more than a decade he had supplied his British spymasters with a stream of priceless secrets from deep within the Soviet intelligence machine. No spy had done more to damage the KGB. The Safeway bag was a signal: to activate his escape plan to be smuggled out of Soviet Russia. So began one of the boldest and most extraordinary episodes in the history of spying. Ben Macintyre reveals a tale of espionage, betrayal and raw courage that changed the course of the Cold War forever…
Military/espionage history | TP | $35.00

D-Day: the Soldiers’ Story
Milton, Giles
The definitive soldier-on-the-beach account of the greatest invasion in history. D-Day was the greatest invasion in history. An epic battle that involved 156,000 men, 7,000 ships and 20,000 armoured vehicles, the desperate struggle that unfolded on 6 June was, above all, a story of individual heroics – men who were driven to keep fighting, until the German defences were smashed and the precarious beachheads secured. In D-Day, Giles Milton paints a dazzling canvas of the opening day of battle, exploring the momentous events through the prism of those who took part. Sweeping from the principal architects at Supreme Command to the graphic testimonies of the men who struggled ashore on the morning of 6 June, his narrative lays bare the absolute terror of those on both sides trapped in the frontline massacres of Operation Overlord. In an overview that is both meticulous and vast, ‘the longest day’ is revealed, as never before – less a masterpiece of strategic planning, than a day on which thousands of scared young men found themselves staring death in the face – told through the eyes of those who took part, as we approach the 75th anniversary of the battle: in 2019.
Military history | TP | $35.00

First You Write a Sentence: the Elements of Reading, Writing… and Life
Moran, Joe
Advanced maths has no practical use, and is understood by few. A symphony can be widely appreciated, but created only by a genius. Good writing, however, can be written (and read) by anyone, if we give it the gift of our time. And a sentence might be as near as many of us will get to orchestrating beauty. Enter universally praised historian Professor Joe Moran. Using minimal technical terms, First You Write a Sentence is his unpedantic explanation of how the most ordinary words can be turned into verbal constellations of extraordinary grace. With examples from the Bible and Shakespeare to Orwell and Diana Athill, and with support from scientific studies of what most fires people’s minds, he shows how we can all write in a way that is vivid, clear and engaging. With chapters from tools of the trade (from typewriters to texting and the impact this has on the craft); and writing and the senses (how to make the world visible and touchable); to how to find the ideal word, build a sentence, and construct a paragraph, First You Write a Sentence informs by light example. It’s an elegant gem in praise of the English sentence.
Writing | HC | $35.00

64 Geeks: the Brains Who Shaped Our World
Newkey-Burden, Chas
Learn about the people who have changed the world. We wouldn’t have Bluetooth or wi-fi, today, without the ingenuity of an actress once described as ‘the most beautiful woman in the world’. And we might have had mobile messaging as early as 1901, were it not for the fickleness of a banker. From celebrated prodigies and self-proclaimed geniuses to history’s hidden heroes – 64 Geeks brings you the incredible stories of the world’s best brains, all presented alongside clever, 8-bit likenesses.
Biography | HC | $19.99

How to Invent Everything: Rebuild All of Civilisation (with 96% fewer catastrophes this time)
North, Ryan
Get ready to make history better… on the second try. Imagine you are stranded in the past (your time machine has broken) and the only way home is to rebuild civilisation yourself. But you need to do it better and faster this time round. In this one amazing book, you will learn How to Invent Everything. Ryan North – bestselling author, programmer and comic-book legend – provides all the science, engineering, mathematics, art, music, philosophy, facts and figures required for this challenge. Thanks to his detailed blueprint, humanity will mature quickly and efficiently – instead of spending 200,000 years stumbling around in the dark without language, not realising that tying a rock to a string would mean we could navigate the entire world. Or thinking disease was caused by weird smells. Fascinating and hilarious, How To Invent Everything is an epic, deeply-researched history of the key technologies that made each stage of human history possible (from writing and farming to buttons and birth control) – and it’s as entertaining as a great time-travel novel. So, if you’ve ever secretly wondered if you could do history better yourself, now is your chance to find out how. ‘How to Invent Everything is such a cool book’ – Randall Munroe.
Science/humour | HC | $37.99

How to Change Your Mind: the New Science of Psychedelics
Pollan, Michael
‘It’s as if we made entering gothic cathedrals illegal, or museums, or sunsets!’ When LSD was first discovered in the 1940s, it seemed to researchers, scientists and doctors as if the world might be on the cusp of psychological revolution. It promised to shed light on the deep mysteries of consciousness, as well as offer relief to addicts and the mentally ill. But in the 1960s, with the vicious backlash against the counter-culture, all further research was banned. In recent years, however, work has quietly begun again on the amazing potential of LSD, psilocybin, and DMT. Could these drugs, in fact, improve the lives of many people? Diving deep into this extraordinary world and putting himself forward as a guinea pig, Michael Pollan has written a remarkable history of psychedelics and a compelling portrait of the new generation of scientists fascinated by the implications of these drugs. How to Change Your Mind is a report from what could very well be the future of human consciousness.
Science/Medicine | TP | $35.00

8-Bit Apocalypse: the Untold Story of Atari’s Missile Command
Rubens, Alex
Before Call of Duty, before World of Warcraft, before even Super Mario Bros, the video game industry exploded in the late 1970s with the advent of the video arcade. Leading the charge was Atari Inc, the creator of the iconic game Missile Command. The first game to double as a commentary on culture, Missile Command put the players’ fingers on ‘the button’, making them responsible for the fate of civilisation in a no-win scenario, all for the price of a quarter. The game was a marvel of modern culture, helping usher in both the age of the video game and the gamer lifestyle. Taking readers back to the days of TaB cola, dot matrix printers, and digging through the couch for just one more quarter, 8-Bit Apocalypse combines Rubens’ knowledge of the tech industry and experience as a gaming journalist to conjure the wild silicon frontier of the 8-bit ’80s.
Technology/History | HC | $49.95

The River of Consciousness
Sacks, Oliver
In his previous books, Oliver Sacks had addressed questions of the brain and mind through the lens of case histories of individuals with neurological disorders. Recently, however, he had been reflecting on his experiences with such patients in the context of a lifetime of medical practice, and in light of recent neuroscientific evidence and theories. The River of Consciousness will be a broader and more direct look at how the brain and mind work, as always, incorporating Sacks’ rich historical and personal context. Advances in neuroscience have revolutionised our ability to visualise the brain in action. For the first time, we are able to close the gap between the philosophical questions which have consumed the world’s thinkers since the eighteenth century and the true physiological basis of perception and consciousness. In The River of Consciousness, Sacks will examine questions of memory, time, and consciousness. How do we think, how do we remember? Do different individuals have different speeds or ways of thinking? Is memory reliable? How do the neural correlates of memory differ for true memories and false memories? How do we construct our sense of time, our visual world? What is consciousness, neurologically speaking? And most importantly, what is creativity?
Science/Memoir | PBK | $19.99

Octopuses (Ladybird Expert)
Scales, Helen
Octopuses is a clear, authoritative and entertaining introduction to these eight-armed, ink-making, soft-bodied wonders. There’s something strange about octopuses, something that makes them quite unlike any other animals on Earth. With their suckered arms they reach into our imaginations, grab hold and don’t let go. Sometimes, the octopuses we conjure are charming and companionable. Ringo Starr invited us beneath the waves, to the welcoming seclusion of an Octopuses’ Garden. More often, the fictional octopuses we invite into our world are far more frightening – Jules fearsome pack of poulpes in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; Octopussy and her gang of female gangsters encountered by James Bond; and, of course, H P Lovecraft’s Cthulhu. Written by celebrated marine biologist and documentarian Dr Helen Scales, Octopuses reveals how our familiarity with all these fun and formidable octopuses has – at least, until recently – been at odds with our understanding of the real, living creatures. Gradually, we’re discovering that fact is often far stranger than fiction.
Marine biology | HC | $19.99

Trigger Warnings: Political Correctness and the Rise of the Right
Sparrow, Jeff
Donald Trump is the Thing-That-Should-Not-Be. The man lives, quite literally, in a building serviced by a golden elevator. Somehow, he presented himself as the scourge of the elites. For decades, he built a persona based on the most conspicuous consumption and the crassest of excess – and then he won the presidency on an antiestablishment ticket. The unlikely rise of Donald J Trump exemplifies the political paradox of the twenty-first century. In this new Gilded Age, the contrast between the haves and the have nots could not be starker. The world’s eight richest billionaires control as much wealth as the poorest half of the planet – a disparity of wealth and political power unknown in any previous period. Yet not only have progressives failed to make gains in circumstances that should, on paper, favour egalitarianism and social justice, the angry populism that’s prospered explicitly targets ideas associated with the left – and none more so than so-called ‘political correctness’. If Trump – and others like Trump – can turn hostility to PC into a winning slogan, how should the left respond? In the face of a vicious new bigotry, should progressives double-down on identity politics and gender theory? Must they abandon political correctness and everything associated with it, to reconnect with a working class they’ve alienated? Or is there, perhaps, another way entirely? In Trigger Warnings, Jeff Sparrow excavates the development of a powerful new vocabulary against progressive causes. From the Days of Rage to Gamergate, from the New Left to the alt-right, he traces changing attitudes to democracy and trauma, symbolism and liberation, in an exhilarating history of ideas and movements. Challenging progressive and conservative orthodoxies alike, Trigger Warnings is a bracing polemic and a persuasive case for a new kind of politics.
Politics | TP | $29.99

The Scandalous Freddie McEvoy: the true story of the swashbuckling Australian rogue
Walker, Frank
Swashbuckler, daredevil racing-car champion, Winter Olympian, gambler, smuggler, scoundrel, stud and suspected spy – this is the fascinating story of the scandalous Freddie McEvoy. Born in Melbourne in 1907, Freddie’s life took him from socialising with a young Errol Flynn in Sydney and on to the French Riviera in the heady years leading up to World War II. With his dashing good looks and charm, Freddie lived a swashbuckling life, quickly figuring out his path to easy fortune was through lonely rich women. World War II didn’t stop Freddie’s hedonistic pursuits – he skipped enlistment for Australia and Britain to party on in Hollywood, where he renewed his friendship with the now-infamous Errol Flynn. Always short of cash, Freddie smuggled guns and diamonds on his yacht between California and Mexico and was rumoured to have worked as a spy. It was a life lived large and Freddie’s death in 1951 was under the most mysterious circumstances off the coast of Morocco: his body was found naked and scalped…
Biography | TP | $32.99

The Origins of Creativity
Wilson, Edward O
‘Creativity is the unique and defining trait of our species; and its ultimate goal, self-understanding,’ begins Edward Wilson’s sweeping examination of the humanities and their relationship to the sciences. By studying fields as diverse as palaeontology, evolutionary biology and neuroscience, Wilson demonstrates that human creativity began not 10,000 years ago, as we have long assumed, but over 100,000 years ago in the Palaeolithic Age. Chronicling the evolution of creativity from primates to humans, Wilson shows how the humanities, in large part spurred on by the invention of language, have played a previously unexamined role in defining our species. Exploring a surprising range of creative endeavours – the instinct to create gardens; the use of metaphors and irony in speech; or the power of music and song – Wilson proposes a transformational ‘Third Enlightenment’ in which the blending of science and the humanities will enable us to gain a deeper understanding of the human condition, and how it ultimately originated.
Science | PBK | $22.99

Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths
Woo, Eddie
Why is a rainbow curved? Why aren’t left-handers extinct? How is a sunflower like a synchronised swimmer? Why is ‘e’ a magic number? The answer to these questions is contained within one simple word: Maths. Because maths is all about patterns, and our universe is extraordinarily patterned. With enthusiasm, humour and heart, Eddie Woo shows how card tricks, conspiracy theories, teacups, killer butterflies, music, lightning and so much more illuminate the spellbinding world of maths that surrounds us. ‘Not just a great teacher, Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths shows Eddie to be a storyteller, too. Is there anything the Woo cannot do?’ – Adam Spencer, Ambassador for Mathematics, University of Sydney.
Mathematics | TP | $29.99

Like a Thief in Broad Daylight: Power in the Era of Post-Humanity
Zizek, Slavoj
In recent years, techno-scientific progress has started to utterly transform our world – changing it almost beyond recognition. In this extraordinary new book, renowned philosopher Slavoj Zizek turns to look at the brave new world of Big Tech, revealing how, with each new wave of innovation, we find ourselves moving closer and closer to a bizarrely literal realisation of Marx’s prediction that ‘all that is solid melts into air’. With the automation of work, the virtualisation of money, the dissipation of class communities and the rise of immaterial, intellectual labour, the global capitalist edifice is beginning to crumble, more quickly than ever before – and it is now on the verge of vanishing entirely. But what will come next? Against a backdrop of constant socio-technological upheaval, how could any kind of authentic change take place? In such a context, Zizek argues, there can be no great social triumph – lasting revolution has already come into the scene, like a thief in broad daylight, stealing into sight right before our ever eyes. What we must do now is wake up and see it. Urgent as ever, Like a Thief in Broad Daylight illuminates the new dangers as well as the radical possibilities thrown up by today’s technological and scientific advances, and their electrifying implications for us all.
Philosophy/Technology | HC | $39.99