Non-Fiction Catalogue: November 2019

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in November 2019.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • up to 500g: $8.95
  • 500g to 1kg: $12.20
  • 1kg to 3 kg: $15.35
  • 3kg to 5 kg: $18.50
  • anything above 5kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

An Officer’s Manual of the Western Front: 1914–1918 (general military)
Bull, Stephen
Many people have the idea that the ‘Great War’ on the Western Front was simple, if ghastly, to fight – with few tactics, and unbroken, monotonous, trench lines as the main feature of the battlefield. In such a scenario the archetypal image of battle is of soldiers with rifles and bayonets charging each other in blind obedience to stupid repetitious orders. Though undeniably bloody the war was in fact a ferment of new ideas and new weapons. Gas, flame throwers, super-heavy artillery, concrete bunkers, tanks, aircraft and other innovations were all introduced, while older notions such as barbed wire, machine guns, and armour took on a new lease of life. No single manual was ever enough to encompass ‘modern war’; and, even before 1914, numerous publications were required. With the focus on the Western Front and the soldiers fighting there, this unique compendium collects together a huge variety of contemporary manuals, leaflets and booklets, and shows how although operations often failed, British commanders made attempts to devise new tactics and weaponry.
Military history | HC | $18.99

B-58 Hustler Units (Combat Aircraft 130)
Davies, Peter E & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
One of the most dramatic bombers of its day, the Convair B-58 came to epitomise the Cold War power of Strategic Air Command. Introduced only 12 years after the sound barrier was first broken, this iconic plane became the first large long-range supersonic bomber to take to the skies, a feat which had seemed far-fetched only a few years previously. Outstripping its contemporaries in terms of speed, and agile enough to escape most interceptors, the B-58 was a remarkable feat of engineering, setting 19 world speed records and collecting a host of trophies. The first operational bomber capable of Mach 2 at 63,000 feet, it was able to evade hostile fighters and represented a serious threat to targets across the Soviet Bloc. Supported by contemporary first-hand accounts, photography, and full-colour illustrations, this study explores the history of this ground-breaking aircraft from its conception to its little-known testing for use in the Vietnam War.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Douglas D-558: D-558-1 Skystreak and D-558-2 Skyrocket (X-Planes 12)
Davies, Peter E & Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
The six Douglas D-558 research aircraft, built as two variants, were produced for a US Navy and NACA collaborative project to investigate flight in the high subsonic and supersonic regimes and to develop means of coping with the dangerous phenomena of compressibility and pitch-up which had caused many accidents to early jets. Wind tunnels could not provide the necessary data so pilots had to risk their safety in experimental aircraft which, for their time, achieved phenomenal performance. Both series of D-558 were well-designed, strong and efficient aircraft which enabled test pilots to tackle the unknown in comparative safety. Though delayed by their innovative but troublesome power plants, and limited by the cost of their air-launched sorties, they went well beyond their original Mach 1 speed objective and continued to generate information that provided design solutions for a whole generation of supersonic combat aircraft. Although the final stage of the D-55 program, the USN’s ‘militarised’ D-558-3, never happened, the Navy was able to apply the lessons of the programme to its much more practical combat types such as the F8U Crusader and F3H Demon. Supported by full-colour artwork including three-view plates of the two D-558 models and a technical view of the D-2 cockpit, this authoritative text offers a comprehensive guide to the record-breaking Navy research craft.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

The Third Reich is Listening: Inside German code-breaking 1939–45 (general military)
Jennings, Christian
The success of the Allied code-breakers at Bletchley Park was one of the iconic intelligence achievements of World War II, immortalised in films such as The Imitation Game and Enigma. But cracking Enigma was only half of the story. Across the Channel, German intelligence agencies were hard at work breaking British and Allied codes. The Third Reich is Listening is a gripping blend of modern history and science, and describes the successes and failures of Germany’s code-breaking and signals intelligence operations from 1935 to 1945. The first mainstream book that takes an in-depth look at German cryptanalysis in World War II, it tells how the Third Reich broke the ciphers of Allied and neutral countries, including Great Britain, France, Russia, and Switzerland. This book offers a dramatic new perspective on one of the biggest stories of World War II, using declassified archive material and colourful personal accounts from the Germans at the heart of the story, including a former astronomer who worked out the British order of battle in 1940, a U-Boat commander on the front line of the Battle of the Atlantic, and the German cryptanalyst who broke into and read crucial codes of the British Royal Navy.
Espionage history | PBK | $24.99

Russian Battleships and Cruisers of the Russo-Japanese War (New Vanguard 275)
Lardas, Mark & Wright, Paul (illustrator)
This book examines the major warships of the Imperial Russian Navy which participated in the Russo-Japanese War. The focus is on the battleships, coastal defence warships, and cruisers of the Pacific Squadron and Baltic Squadron that fought during the war. It discusses in detail their design and development between the years of 1885 and 1905, concentrating particularly on battleships and cruisers. The book explores, in depth, the mutually influential relationship between Russian and foreign warship design, as Russia progressed from a reliance on foreign designs and shipyards towards an ability to produce its own influential ships, such as the Novik. The title also outlines the gripping operational history of the Russian warships which participated in the Russo-Japanese war, tracing their activity before and during the combat, as well as the post-war fate of those ships which were bombarded, scuttled, captured, or salvaged. Packed with contemporary photography and full-colour illustrations, this title offers a detailed and definitive guide to the design, development, and destiny of the Russian warships which battled the Japanese in the Eastern seas.
Naval history | PBK | $24.99

German Flak Defences vs Allied Heavy Bombers: 1942–45 (Duel 98)
Nijboer, Donald & Laurier, Jim; Hector, Gareth (illustrators)
Since the end of World War II, the strategic bombing of Germany has inspired numerous studies, countless books and several documentary films, and it is not surprising. With more than one million tons of bombs dropped, close to 300,000 civilians killed, 700,000 wounded and in excess of 3,500,000 industrial and residential structures destroyed, the Allied bomber offensive was industrial war on a grand scale. The air battle that raged over Germany has often been described as a battle between Allied and German fighters but what has been frequently missed by historians on all sides is the impact of German anti-aircraft defences (flak). Though often dismissed as ineffective and a waste of valuable material and personnel, the German flak arm made a major contribution to the defence of the Third Reich – at least half of the American aircraft shot down over Germany fell to flak, and according to the RAF Official History, it was estimated that flak accounted for 1229 of 3302 aircraft lost by Bomber Command, between 1942 and April 1945. Additionally, the strategic role of flak extended beyond simply shooting down aircraft – its other, more important task was to force bombers to drop their ordnance sooner or from a higher altitude, thus reducing bombing accuracy. Both these roles are explored in depth in this detailed study of the German flak defences and of their adversaries, the Allied heavy bombers. Containing full-colour illustrations including cockpit scenes and armament views, this is the definitive guide to the much-overlooked conflict between Allied planes and German anti-aircraft defences.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Panzerfaust vs Sherman: European Theatre 1944–45 (Duel 99)
Zaloga, Steven J & Gilliland, Alan; Shumate, Johnny (illustrators)
In the summer of 1944, across the battlefields of Normandy, US tanks were confronted with a dangerous challenge: the mobile and deadly Panzerfaust and Panzerschreck anti-tank weapons wielded by the German infantry. Having only occasionally encountered such weaponry before, the US tankers were ill equipped to defend against this kind of attack, and the threat only increased as the summer wore on. This Duel title follows the technological battle for dominance that ensued, as the US Army devised new ways to defend against the threat posed by the German shaped-charge projectiles. From the addition of sandbags and spare tracks to individual tanks made by anxious crews on the ground to the large-scale programs put together by the US armies, the book explores the implementation and effectiveness of the various tactics employed by the tank crews, as well as the technology behind the anti-tank weapons wielded by their German adversaries. Drawing on first-hand accounts from the men on the ground, this illustrated title examines the evolving trial of strength between US armour and innovative German anti-tank weaponry in the climactic months of World War II in Europe.
Military history | PBK | $32.99

 

General non-fiction

Myths, Legends, and Sacred Stories: a Children’s Encyclopaedia

Explore myths and legends from around the world in this incredible encyclopaedia. From lightning-wielding Zeus, the supreme Greek god, to protective Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love – heroes, gods, and monsters are brought to life in these retellings of myths from around the world. Myths and Legends is a children’s book that invites you to explore all the well-known stories from Greek and Norse mythology, and a range of other cultures across more than 100 tales. Discover the fascinating myths of Anansi, the West African trickster god who takes the form of a spider; Changing Woman, the Navajo nature goddess who changes her dress with the seasons; or Tane, the Maori forest god who first brought death to the world. Read about ferocious, man-eating monsters such as the Minotaur and Fafnir the dragon, and the legendary heroes that fought them, like Theseus and Sigurd. Also included are the legends of Robin Hood, and of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, epics such as the Mahabharata and Gilgamesh, and a host of tales from Aztec mythology, and a range of other cultures. As well as offering the retellings themselves, Myths and Legends: A Children’s Encyclopaedia investigates the meanings of these primal stories, examining why these tales have stood the test of time over thousands of years. Themed features draw together elements that are common to myths from all over the world, such as shape-changers, mythical beasts, and magical weapons. Panels on modern retellings, such as China’s The Monkey King and Marvel’s Thor, help to show why these myths are still relevant to our lives today.
Reference | HC | $39.99

How the World Thinks: a Global History of Philosophy
Baggini, Julian
The first ever global overview of philosophy: how it developed around the world and impacted the cultures in which it flourished. All cultures are different, and have different ways of thinking. In How the World Thinks, Julian Baggini travels the globe to provide a hugely wide-ranging map of human thought. He shows us how distinct branches of philosophy flowered simultaneously in China, India and Ancient Greece, growing from local myths and stories – and how contemporary cultural attitudes, with particular attention to the West, East Asia, the Muslim World and Africa, have developed out of the philosophical histories of their regions. Interviewing thinkers from all around the world, he asks why, for instance, do our European systems of governments and justice differ, so widely, from the East? Why can Islam not easily incorporate secular knowledge? How do we understand China? By gaining greater knowledge of how others think, we can become less certain of the knowledge we think we have, the first step to greater understanding.
Philosophy/History | PBK | $24.99

Hollywood Wants to Kill You
Brooks, Michael & Edwards, Rick
Asteroids, killer sharks, nuclear bombs, viruses, deadly robots, climate change, the apocalypse – why is Hollywood so obsessed with death and the end of the world? And how seriously should we take the dystopian visions of our favourite films? With wit, intelligence and irreverence, Rick Edwards and Dr Michael Brooks explore the science of death and mass destruction through some of our best-loved Hollywood blockbusters. From Armageddon and Dr Strangelove to The Terminator, and Contagion, they investigate everything from astrophysics to AI, with hilarious and captivating consequences. Packed with illustrations, fascinating facts and numerous spoilers, Hollywood Wants to Kill You is the perfect way into the science of our inevitable demise.
Science | HC | $29.99

The End is Always Near:
Apocalyptic Moments from the Bronze Age Collapse to Nuclear Near Misses

Carlin, Dan
In his first book, the creator of the award-winning podcast Hardcore History looks to some of humanity’s most apocalyptic moments to understand the challenges of our future. Do tough times create tougher people? Can humanity handle the power of its weapons without destroying itself? Will human technology or capabilities ever peak or regress? Why, since the dawn of time, has it always seemed as though death and destruction is waiting just around the corner? In The End is Always Near, Dan Carlin connects the past and future in fascinating and colourful ways, exploring a question that has hung over humanity like the Sword of Damocles from the collapse of the Bronze Age to the nuclear era – that of human survival. Combining his trademark mix of storytelling, history, and thought experiments, Carlin forces us to consider what sounds like fantasy: that we might suffer the same fate as all previous civilisations. Will our world ever become a ruin for future archaeologists to dig up and explore? This thrillingly expansive and entertaining book will make you look at the past – and future – in a completely different way.
History | TP | $34.99

Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime
Carroll, Sean
Quantum physics is not mystifying. Its implications may be mind bending, and not yet fully understood, but the theory is illuminating. It is the best explanation of reality we have. And no, God does not play dice with the universe. Spanning the history of quantum discoveries, from Einstein and Bohr to the present day, this is the essential guide to the most intriguing subject in science. Carroll debunks the myths that have grown up around quantum physics, resurrects and reinstates the Many-Worlds Interpretation, and presents a new path to solving the apparent conflict between quantum mechanics and gravity. A magisterial tour, Something Deeply Hidden encompasses the cosmological and everyday implications of quantum reality. And, finally, it all makes sense.
Science | HC | $39.99

The Hero: the Enduring Myth that Makes Us All Human
Child, Lee
In his first work of non-fiction, the creator of the multimillion-selling Jack Reacher series explores the endurance of heroes from Achilles to Bond, showing us how this age-old myth is a fundamental part of what makes us human. He demonstrates how hero stories continue to shape our world – arguing that we need them, now, more than ever. From the Stone Age to the Greek Tragedies, from Shakespeare to Robin Hood, we have always had our heroes. The hero is at the centre of formative myths in every culture and persists to this day in world-conquering books, films and TV shows. But why do these characters continue to inspire us, and why are they so central to storytelling? Scalpel sharp on the roots of storytelling and enlightening on the history and science of myth, The Hero is essential reading for anyone trying to write or understand fiction. Child teaches us how these stories still shape our minds and behaviour in an increasingly confusing modern world, and with his trademark concision and wit, demonstrates that however civilised we get, we’ll always need heroes.
History/Psychology | HC | $17.99

Numbers in Minutes
Collins, Julia
The quickest explanation of maths, in 200 essential numbers. Why 60 seconds in a minute? Who invented zero? What exactly is pi? Why do mathematicians hunt prime numbers? And how can you get a number bigger than infinity? To find out, take a tour through 200 important, fascinating and unusual numbers – the easy and entertaining way to grasp mathematics. Numbers in Minutes demystifies the maths surrounding the key numbers including: zero, 1–40, negatives, percentages, prime numbers, fractions, decimals, pi, exponentials, imaginary numbers, squares and cubes, roots and powers, Fibonacci numbers, the golden ratio, millions and trillions, a googol, ‘perfect,’ ‘kissing,’ ‘vampire’ and ‘weird’ numbers, infinity, infinity+1 and other sizes of infinity… Every number is explained in a few short paragraphs with a helpful picture, making the maths simple to understand and remember.
Mathematics | TP | $26.99

Outspoken: 50 Speeches by Incredible Women from Boudicca to Michelle Obama
Coughlin, Deborah
Women of note: This is one of the first ever published collections of speeches by women, presented by feminist writer and Women’s Hour contributing editor, Deborah Coughlin. History didn’t listen to women, but that never stopped them from speaking out… A lot of history is made up of speeches. Speeches about big ideas, celebratory speeches, rousing speeches to inspire soldiers to fight to the death, comic speeches to help us see the funny side to life. From Jesus to Winston Churchill to Martin Luther King Jr, and even Donald Trump, we’ve been raised with the words of important men ringing in our ears… But where are all the women? Unless you’re the type of person who loves researching suffrage speeches, you are unlikely to know many soundbites from women throughout history. Outspoken: 50 Speeches by Incredible Women is going to change that. From Joan of Arc and Virginia Woolf, to Oprah Winfrey and Greta Thunberg, this is a celebration of outstanding and outspoken women, everywhere.
Feminist oratory | HC | $32.99

The Deviant’s Pocket Guide to the Outlandish Sexual Desires
Barely Contained in Your Subconscious

DiClaudio, Dennis
In tribute to the many splendours of human sexuality, The Deviant’s Pocket Guide to the Outlandish Sexual Desires Barely Contained in Your Subconscious profiles over 40 of the wildest and woolliest sexual proclivities you’ll ever find, even on the internet. The human race is a species of inventors. In our few millennia of existence, we’ve created fire, the wheel, the printing press, vaccines, and the internet. But never is our creativity more evident, than when it comes time to reproduce. For nature lovers, there’s Dendrophilia (you know, tree hugging). For car people, there’s the Automotive Fetish. And for those people who love stuffed animals… you’ll just have to look inside. Each entry in this one-of-a-kind encyclopaedia explores the psychological underpinnings, important logistics, and typical fantasies associated with the deviance in question. For the aspiring deviant, there’s even a list of useful accoutrements. Hysterical and astonishingly thorough, The Deviant’s Pocket Guide is the only reference book you’ll ever need.
Psychology | PBK | $19.99

The Hypochondriac’s Pocket Guide to Horrible Diseases You Probably Already Have
DiClaudio, Dennis
Hypochondriacs can now fret appropriately and factually, with this pocket guide to more than 40 disgusting, horrible diseases. All entries include symptoms, a diagnosis guide, treatment suggestions, a prognosis, and – if you are not yet infected – prevention tips. Do you suffer from insomnia? Not good… soon, your whole body might attack your brain. Are you bothered by a persistent fever and swelling? Beware… maggots are likely crawling beneath your skin. Have you noticed skin tenderness and discolouration? Yikes… a small horn is probably going to sprout from your head. Because it’s ultra-portable, you can (and, probably, should) have The Hypochondriac’s Pocket Guide to Horrible Diseases You Probably Already Have with you at all times so at the slightest onset of an unmistakably fatal-feeling itchy rash, you can simply whip out your trusty guide, conveniently diagnose yourself, and then let the worrying begin.
Psychology | PBK | $19.99

The Paranoid’s Pocket Guide to Mental Disorders You Can Just Feel Coming On
DiClaudio, Dennis
Giving neurotics everywhere something to worry about, The Paranoid’s Pocket Guide to Mental Disorders You Can Just Feel Coming On profiles more than 40 of the most outrageous and yet eerily familiar psychological disorders – a fascinating array of obsessions, compulsions, phobias, fixations, and full-blown mental maladies. Every disorder is well documented, including common symptoms, causes, and treatment options, along with a handy quiz for easy self-diagnosis. And in case you can’t tell whether or not you’re losing it, each entry includes a sample inner monologue detailing the thought processes at play – because sometimes you don’t know you’re crazy until you see it in writing. Hot on the heels of the equally hilarious The Hypochondriac’s Pocket Guide to Horrible Diseases You Probably Already Have, the Paranoid’s Guide will have even the most rational thinkers second-guessing their sanity.
Psychology | PBK | $19.99

Eight Master Lessons of Nature
Ferguson, Gary
A rich and gentle manifesto of how to forge vital and meaningful connections with nature and what the natural world can teach us about human life. For too long, we have set ourselves apart from nature, seeing ourselves as superior, removed, independent. But, in doing so, we have lost sight of all that the natural world can teach us. In Eight Master Lessons of Nature, Gary Ferguson reveals the wisdom of the natural world. By keenly observing and admiring wildlife and their surroundings, he shows us why sympathy is our greatest asset and crucial to our survival, that feminine rule is default in the natural world, and how even from the ashes of destruction, life is still able to thrive. Written in rich and nourishing prose, Ferguson gently dismantles the walls we have erected between ourselves and nature, showings us the wonder of our surroundings in all their splendour. Drawing on stories from art and science, flora and fauna, philosophy and history, he carefully unravels the dazzling web of connections that binds us to earth and the rich supply of wisdom that is stored here. The result is a powerful and timely reminder of our place in this world, our interdependence, and how much nature is able to teach, heal and ultimately restore us.
Natural history | HC | $29.99

Great Speeches in Minutes
Field, Jacob F
Two hundred historic speeches and the stories behind them. They are the great words of history, inspiring war and peace, outrage and justice, rebellion and freedom. Great Speeches in Minutes presents the key extracts of 200 of the orations that changed the world, from antiquity to the modern day. Each is accompanied by an explanation of the historic context of the speech and its momentous consequences. Includes the speeches of: Buddha, Socrates, Alexander the Great, Cicero, Julius Caesar, Jesus, Augustine of Hippo, Muhammad, Joan of Arc, Martin Luther, Elizabeth I, Oliver Cromwell, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Napoleon Bonaparte, Simon Bolivar, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Abraham Lincoln, Emmeline Pankhurst, Patrick Pearse, Vladimir Lenin, David Lloyd George, Albert Einstein, Mahatma Gandhi, Franklin D Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Winston Churchill, John F Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela, Lyndon B Johnson, Muhammad Ali, Mother Teresa, Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, Vaclav Havel, Pope John Paul II, George W Bush, Barack Obama, and many more.
Oratory | TP | $26.99

Don’t Be Evil: the Case Against Big Tech
Foroohar, Rana
From the acclaimed Financial Times columnist and CNN analyst, a penetrating indictment of how today’s biggest tech companies are hijacking our data, our livelihoods, and our minds. Today, Google and Facebook receive 90% of the world’s news ad-spending. Amazon takes half of all ecommerce in the US. Google and Apple operating systems run on all but 1% of cell phones, globally. And 80% of corporate wealth is now held by 10% of companies – not the GEs and Toyotas of this world, but the digital titans. How did we get here? How did the tech industry get to dominate our world, so completely? How did once-idealistic and innovative companies come to manipulate elections, violate our privacy, and pose a threat to the fabric of our democracy? In Don’t Be Evil, Rana Foroohar documents how Big Tech lost its soul – and became the new Wall Street. Through her skilled reporting and unparalleled access – won through nearly 30 years covering business and technology – she shows the true extent to which the ‘Faang’s (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, and Google) crush or absorb any potential competitors, hijack our personal data and mental space and offshore their exorbitant profits. What’s more, she reveals how these threats to our democracies, our livelihoods and our minds are all intertwined. Yet, Foroohar also lays out a plan for how we can resist, creating a framework that fosters innovation while also protecting us from the dark side of digital technology.
Technology | TP | $35.00

Superpower: Australia’s Low-Carbon Opportunity
Garnaut, Ross
A blueprint for harnessing Australia’s renewable energy potential to become a global economic superpower. ‘The fog of Australian politics on climate change has obscured a fateful reality – Australia has the potential to be an economic superpower of the future post-carbon world.’ – Ross Garnaut. We have unparalleled renewable energy resources. We also have the necessary scientific skills. Australia could be the natural home for an increasing proportion of global industry. But how do we make it happen? In this crisp, compelling book, Australia’s leading thinker about climate and energy policy offers a road map for progress, covering energy, transport, agriculture, the international scene, and more. Rich in ideas and practical optimism, Superpower is a crucial, timely contribution to this country’s future.
Politics/Environmentalism | TP | $29.99

Galaxia: the Ultimate Visual Guide to the Universe
Geographic, National
This compelling visual journey through our galaxy combines more than 350 photographs, illustrations, and graphics to present the universe as you’ve never seen it before. Galaxia is a deep dive into the past, present, and future of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. In this mind-expanding visual tour through the cosmos, spectacular photographs are converted into interpretive graphics, starting with the sun and moving outward into space where stars are born, black holes lurk, and planets of diverse size and anatomy spin through their orbit. The final chapters locate our galaxy within the known universe and add a scintillating peek of other exoplanets in the cosmos. Detailed maps and fascinating imagery from recent space missions are paired with clear, authoritative scientific information.
Science | HC | $79.99

Dawn of the Code War:
America’s Battle Against Russia, China, and the Rising Global Cyber Threat

Graff, Garrett M & Carlin, John P
This firsthand account of the fight to protect America from foreign hackers warns of the unprecedented danger that awaits us in the era of the internet of things, unless we can change our internet and technology culture. With each passing year, the internet-linked attacks on America’s interests have grown in both frequency and severity. Overmatched by our military, countries like North Korea, China, Iran, and Russia have found us vulnerable in cyberspace. The ‘Code War’ is upon us. In this dramatic book, former Assistant Attorney-General John P Carlin takes readers to the front lines of a global but little-understood fight as the Justice Department and the FBI chases down hackers, online terrorist recruiters, and spies. Today, as our entire economy goes digital, from banking to manufacturing to transportation, the potential targets for our enemies multiply. This firsthand account is both a remarkable untold story and a warning of dangers yet to come.
National security | PBK | $26.99

Overview: a New Way of Seeing Earth (Young Explorer’s edition)
Grant, Benjamin & Markle, Sandra
Discover Earth as you’ve never seen it before, in this stunning and unique collection of satellite images that offer an unexpected look at our planet. A perfect gift for young National Geographic fans and atlas enthusiasts! When astronauts look down at our planet and see its vibrant surface shining against the blackness of space, they experience the Overview Effect – a sense of awe, an awareness that everything is interconnected, and an overwhelming desire to take care of our one and only home. Overview: Young Explorer’s Edition, newly adapted for young readers from the adult book Overview, captures this sense of wonder and shares it with readers without having to leave the ground. Extraordinary aerial photographs reveal Earth’s natural beauty and show the surprising, fascinating, and destructive ways humans have impacted our environment. This eye-opening visual journey will forever change the way we see our home planet.
Science | HC | $39.99

World War II in Minutes
Grant, R G
The shortest history of our greatest conflict. Clear, concise yet comprehensive, World War II in Minutes is the quickest way to understand the greatest conflict in human history. From its causes to its aftermath, this book details in 200 mini-essays every key event of the war, including the rise of Hitler, the Dunkirk evacuation, the Battle of Britain, Pearl Harbor, Midway and Iwo Jima, the sieges of Leningrad and Stalingrad, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, D-Day and the fall of Berlin, and much, much more. Covers all aspects of World War II: origins and politics; major battles; great leaders; weapons and technology; civilian life and atrocities; turning points and surrenders; and the reverberations of the war through history. Illustrated with 200 contemporary photographs, images and maps.
Military history | TP | $26.99

London’s Underground: the Story of the Tube
Green, Oliver & Graham, Benjamin (photographer)
It is impossible to imagine London without the Tube: the beating heart of the city, the Underground shuttles over a billion passengers each year below its busy streets and across its leafy suburbs. The distinctive roundel, colour-coded maps and Johnston typeface have become design classics, recognised and imitated worldwide. Opening in 1863, the first sections were operated by steam engines, yet throughout its long history the Tube has been at the forefront of contemporary design, pioneering building techniques, electrical trains and escalators, and business planning. Architects such as Leslie W Green and Charles Holden developed a distinctively English version of Modernism, and the latest stations for the Jubilee line extension, Overground, and Elizabeth line carry this aesthetic forward into the twenty-first century. In this major work published in association with Transport for London, Tube expert Oliver Green traces the history of the Underground, following its troubles and triumphs, its wartime and peacetime work, and the essential part it has played in shaping London’s economy, geography, tourism, and identity. Specially-commissioned photography by Benjamin Graham (UK Landscape Photographer of the Year 2017) brings the story to life in vivid portraits of London Underground’s stations, tunnels, and trains.
History/Society and culture | HC | $59.99

I You We Them: Journeys Beyond Evil – the Desk Killer in History and Today
Gretton, Dan
A landmark historical investigation into crimes against humanity and the nature of evil that is over two decades in the making. ‘The sad truth is that most evil is done by people who never make up their minds to be good or evil.’ – Hannah Arendt. I You We Them is a study of the psychology of some of the least visible perpetrators of crimes against humanity, the ‘desk killers’ who ordered and directed some of the worst atrocities of the last two hundred years. It is also an exploration of corporate responsibility and personal culpability today, connecting the bureaucratic blindness that created desk killing to the same moral myopia that exists now in the calm, clean offices of global capitalism. It is a journal of discovery, based on decades of research, interviews with hundreds of participants, and extensive first-hand experience. It encompasses extended investigations into a number of specific cases, moving from the brutalities of Empire to the scorched oil fields of the Niger Delta, from the industrial complex of Auschwitz to the empty sites of the Bosnian genocide; bearing witness, recording, and attempting to understand. It is a synthesis of history, reportage and memoir, a sustained meditation on the nature of responsibility and injustice, and a book that will change the way we think about our past, present and future.
History/Genocide | TP | $35.00

Making the Monster: the Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
Harkup, Kathryn
The year 1818 saw the publication of one of the most influential science-fiction stories of all time. Frankenstein: Or, Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley had a huge impact on gothic horror and science fiction genres. The name Frankenstein has become part of our everyday language, often used in derogatory terms – to describe scientists who have overstepped a perceived moral line. But how did a 19-year-old woman with no formal education come up with the idea for an extraordinary novel, such as Frankenstein? The period 1790–1820 saw huge advances in our understanding of electricity and physiology. Sensational science demonstrations caught the imagination of the general public, and newspapers were full of lurid tales of murderers and resurrectionists. It is unlikely that Frankenstein would have been successful in his attempts to create life, back in 1818. However, advances in medical science mean we have overcome many of the stumbling blocks that would have thwarted his ambition. We can resuscitate people using defibrillators, we can save lives using blood transfusions, and we can prolong life through organ transplants – these procedures are nowadays considered almost routine. Many of these modern achievements are a direct result of 19th century scientists conducting their gruesome experiments on the dead. Making the Monster explores the science behind Shelley’s book. From tales of reanimated zombie kittens to electrical experiments on human cadavers, Kathryn Harkup examines the science and scientists that influenced Mary Shelley and inspired her most famous creation, Victor Frankenstein. While, thankfully, we are still far from being able to recreate Victor’s ‘creature’, scientists have tried to create the building blocks of life, and the dream of creating life forms, from scratch, is now tantalisingly close.
Science | PBK | $22.99

The Big Book of Australia’s War Stories:
a collection of stories of Australia’s iconic battles and campaigns from the Boer War to Vietnam

Haynes, Jim
From Federation to the Vietnam War, from our first VC winner to our hundredth, this sweeping overview of Australia’s military adventures both overseas and at home is a guide to understanding how this nation’s role in the twentieth century’s major conflicts unfolded as each war ebbed and flowed. These stories have formed Australia’s collective memory of war. Some battles and campaigns are household names, although their historical significance may have been lost. Others are barely remembered now, but are part of our history and deserve to be retold. These are the accounts, recollections and legends that explain Australia’s wartime reputation. They demonstrate the extraordinary courage, resilience, stoic humour, personal heroism and sacrifice that created the mythology of the Aussie ‘digger’ – the soldiers, sailors, nurses and flyers who did things their own way and earned the undying respect of both their allies and their enemies.
War stories | TP | $32.99

The Double Dangerous Book For Boys
Iggulden, Conn
Spark your imagination, forge your own adventures and unearth long-lost skills. In this long-awaited follow-up to his much-loved bestseller, written with his sons Cameron and Arthur, Conn Iggulden presents a brand-new compendium of cunning schemes, projects, tricks, games and tales of extraordinary courage. Whether it’s building a flying machine (keep your temper with this one), or learning how to pick a padlock (or your own front door, but not someone else’s), discovering our forgotten explorers and the world’s greatest speeches, or mastering the lauded task of solving a Rubik’s cube, The Double Dangerous Book for Boys is the ultimate companion to be cherished by readers and doers of all ages.
Activities | HC | $45.00

Britain’s 100 Best Railway Stations
Jenkins, Simon
The bestselling bard of Britain on that great institution we all love: the railway station. It is the location of all our hopeful beginnings and intended ends; an institution with its own rituals and priests; and a long-neglected aspect of Britain’s architecture: the railway station. Bestselling historian Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of the country to select this joyous celebration of our social history. With his usual insight and authority, he describes the history, geography, design and significance of each of these glories; explores their role in the national imagination; champions the engineers, architects and rival companies that made them possible; and tells the story behind the development, triumphs and follies of these very British creations. From Waterloo to Whitby, St Pancras to Stirling, these are the marvellous, often undersung places that link our nation. All aboard!
History | HC | $49.99

Crusaders: an Epic History For the Wars For the Holy Lands
Jones, Dan
Dan Jones, bestselling chronicler of the Middle Ages, turns his attention to the history of the Crusades – the sequence of religious wars fought between the late eleventh century and late medieval periods, in which armies from European Christian states attempted to wrest the Holy Land from Islamic rule, and which have left an enduring imprint on relations between the Muslim world and the West. From the preaching of the First Crusade by Pope Urban II in 1095 to the loss of the last crusader outpost in the Levant in 1302–03, and from the taking of Jerusalem from the Fatimids in 1099 to the fall of Acre to the Mamluks in 1291, Crusaders tells a tale soaked in Islamic, Christian and Jewish blood, peopled by extraordinary characters, and characterised by both low ambition and high principle. Dan Jones is a master of popular narrative history, with the priceless ability to write page-turning narrative history underpinned by authoritative scholarship. Never before has the era of the Crusades been depicted in such bright and striking colours, or their story told with such gusto.
History | HC | $45.00

Memento Mori
Jones, Peter
In this revealing and entertaining guide to how the Romans confronted their own mortality, Peter Jones shows us that all the problems associated with old age and death that so transfix us today were already dealt with by our ancient ancestors, two thousand years ago. Romans inhabited a world where man, knowing nothing about hygiene let alone disease, had no defences against nature. Death was everywhere. Half of all Roman children were dead by the age of five. Only eight per cent of the population made it over sixty. One bizarre result was that half the population consisted of teenagers. From the elites’ philosophical take on the brevity of life to the epitaphs left by butchers, bakers and buffoons, Memento Mori (‘Remember you die’) shows how the Romans faced up to this world and attempted to take the sting out of death.
History | PBK | $22.99

Quid Pro Quo: What the Romans Really Gave the English Language
Jones, Peter
Did you know that the word ‘prestige’ derives from the Latin word for ‘illusion’? Or that ‘infantry’ stems from a Latin word meaning one who could not speak? In this original and highly-entertaining book, Peter Jones reveals the roots of Latin words that are now common in the English language and shows how Romans actually used them in the ancient world. Covering every aspect of Roman life – from politics, philosophy, religion and the arts, to technology, warfare, medicine and botany – Quid Pro Quo highlights the vital role Latin has played in the creation of our vast vocabulary.
History | PBK | $22.99

Veni, Vidi, Vici:
Everything You Wanted to Know About the Romans but were Afraid to Ask

Jones, Peter
The Romans left a long-lasting legacy and their influence can still be seen all around us – from our calendar and coins, to our language and laws – but how much do we really know about them? Help is at hand in the form of Veni, Vidi, Vici, which tells the remarkable, and often surprising, story of the Romans and the most enduring empire in history. Fusing a lively and entertaining narrative with rigorous research, Veni, Vidi, Vici breaks down each major period into a series of concise nuggets that provide a fascinating commentary on every aspect of the Roman world – from plebs to personalities, sauces to sexuality, games to gladiators, poets to punishments, mosaics to medicine and Catullus to Christianity. Through the twists and turns of his 1250-year itinerary, Jones is a friendly and clear-thinking guide. In this book, he has produced a beguiling and entertaining introduction to the Romans, one that vividly brings to life the people who helped create the world we live in today.
History | PBK | $22.99

Dr Karl’s Random Road Trip through Science
Kruszelnicki, Karl
In this, his 45th book, Dr Karl goes full kolour, with brilliant and funny illustrations to match his dress sense. So, take a technikolour trip through science with the intrepid Dr Karl, Australia’s favourite science guru. Dr Karl is on a mission to track down Awe and Wonder in the Universe. Why do wombats poo cubes? What nearly destroyed humanity on Halloween 2015? How do you use an incinerating toilet? Find out why we’ve sent a spacecraft with Dr Karl’s name on it to kiss the Sun, whether cannibalism is nutritious, and the answer to the Biggeset Question of All – why does spaghetti always break into three pieces? Plus a whole lot more. So, strap in and get ready for a random ride through the Universe. Who knows where you’ll end up!
Science | PBK | $35.00

User Friendly:
How the Hidden Rules of Design are Changing the Way We Live, Work and Play

Kuang, Cliff & Fabricant, Robert
In User Friendly, Cliff Kuang, a design strategist at Google and veteran technology journalist at Fast Company and Wired, working with Robert Fabricant, a well-known product designer, reveals the hidden ways in which design is reshaping our lives… User Friendly is a must-read for anyone who loves well-designed products – and for the innovators aspiring to make them. It seems like magic when some new gadget seems to know what we want before we know ourselves. But why does some design feel intrinsically good, and why do some designs last forever, while others disappear? User Friendly guides readers through the hidden rules governing how design shapes our behaviour, told through fascinating stories such as what the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island reveals about the logic of the smartphone; how the pressures of the Great Depression and World War II created our faith in social progress through better product design; and how a failed vision for Disney World yielded a new paradigm for designed experience.
Technology | TP | $35.00

Milk! a 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Kurlansky, Mark
According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera’s breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother’s milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanisation made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurisation slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurisation. Profoundly intertwined with human civilisation, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid’s diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.
History | PBK | $22.99

Hitler’s Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich
Lane, Mary M
The riveting story of Hitler’s obsession with art, how it fuelled his vision of a purified Nazi state, and the fate of the artwork that was hidden, stolen, or destroyed to ‘cleanse’ German culture. The story of art is integral to the story of the rise of Nazi Germany. Adolf Hitler, an artist himself, was obsessed with art – in particular, the aesthetic of a purified regime, scoured of ‘degenerate’ influences that characterised Germany during the 1920s and 1930s. The Germany of Cabaret, hyperinflation, and Rosa Luxemburg was a society in turmoil, and among those who revelled in the discord were a generation of artists for whom art was a political weapon. They were fierce, inspired, and rebellious, but to Hitler, they were anathema. When they came to power in 1933, Hitler and Goebbels set their aesthetic vision into motion and removed degenerate art from German life: artists fled the country; museums were purged; and great works disappeared, only a fraction of which were rediscovered at the end of the Second World War. Most remained in garrets and cellars, the last hostages of the era of the Reich. In 2014, 1290 works by Chagall, Picasso, Matisse, Otto Dix, Max Beckmann, and others were rediscovered. In Hitler’s Last Hostages, Mary Lane brilliantly tells the story of art and the Third Reich, and the fate of Germany’s great era of artists as they fought to survive the Nazi era.
History | HC | $39.99

Because Internet: Understanding how language is changing
McCulloch, Gretchen
Because Internet is for anyone who’s ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message, or wondered where memes come from. It’s the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that’s a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are. Language is humanity’s most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster, and in more interesting ways, than ever before. Internet conversations are structured by the shape of our apps and platforms, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What’s more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can watch language evolve in real time. Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer ‘LOL’ or ‘lol’; why sparkly tildes succeeded, where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed; what emoji have in common with physical gestures; and how the artfully-disarrayed language of animal memes like lolcats and doggo made them more likely to spread.
Evolution of language | HC | $29.99

Science (Vintage Minis)
McEwan, Ian
‘This is a history of intellectual courage, hard work, occasional inspiration and every conceivable form of human failing. It is also an extended invitation to wonder, to pleasure…’ How far have we come, in our understanding of the world around us? In this eye-opening collection, Ian McEwan looks back at the history of scientific discovery from Darwin to Dawkins, as well as exploring, with brilliant originality, what a future with AI and climate change could hold for us. Selected from Solar, Enduring Love, Machines Like Me. Vintage Minis bring you the world’s greatest writers on the experiences that make us human – from birth to death and everything in between.
Science | PBK | $7.99

Books that Saved My Life: Reading for Wisdom, Solace and Pleasure
McGirr, Michael
Great literature is thrilling. It will feed your hungry mind and take your heart on a journey. It will help you on the wonderful path to one of life’s most elusive and hard-won freedoms, freedom from the ego. Here is a book about the sheer joy of living, exploring forty texts that can enrich us in all manner of ways. Some are recent, such as Harry Potter; some ancient, such as Homer and Lao Tzu. There are memoirs (Nelson Mandela), poetry (Les Murray) and many of the world’s great novels, from George Eliot’s Middlemarch to Toni Morrison’s Beloved. This book uses them to muse upon life in all its glorious complexity. Our guide, in entertaining short accounts of personal encounters with these works, is Michael McGirr: schoolteacher and father, reviewer of hundreds of books and lifelong lover of literature. His humour and insight shine through in essays that connect the texts he has selected with each other, and connect us to them. This is the ideal companion for a keen reader – and it may just inspire someone you know to become one, too. Never prescriptive, and often very funny, Books that Saved My Life is an invitation to reflect on the extraordinary gift of reading. ‘It is a gift that is taking me a lifetime to unwrap,’ McGirr writes. ‘The excitement has never worn off.’
Reading | PBK | $22.99

The Scotland Yard Puzzle Book
McKay, Sinclair
Crime scenes, conundrums and whodunnits to test your inner detective. Prove that you have what it takes to be a detective at the Yard… How can a man be in two places at once? How might a murder be committed when no one is seen entering or exiting the house? Can an entire crime be solved with just a suitcase of empty beer bottles? It’s time for you to tackle the conundrums that confounded the best Yard detectives over the years. Since it opened its doors in 1829, Scotland Yard has used the science of detection to solve the most macabre of murders and catch the most audacious of thieves. The Scotland Yard Puzzle Book takes a look through the history of this famous institution and recreates some of the most complex puzzles its detectives have ever faced. Technology can now shine a light on some of the most difficult cases, but the analytical mind needed to crack the clues remains as essential as ever. Do you have what it takes to be a Scotland Yard detective?
Puzzles | TP | $29.99

Improv For Writers:
10 Secrets to Help Novelists and Screenwriters Bypass Writer’s Block and Generate Infinite Ideas

Marie, Jorjeana
Improv instructor and writer Jorjeana Marie presents the first book to harness the creative power of improvisation exercises to help both aspiring and seasoned authors defeat writer’s block and generate new ideas. Suffering from writer’s block and inner critics? Having trouble generating ideas for plots, settings, and characters? Introducing the rules and techniques of improvisation as they apply to fiction writing, improv instructor and writer Jorjeana Marie addresses each major element of storytelling by applying writer’s-block-busting games and inner-critic-quieting exercises to get the creative ideas flowing. Armed with the power of improv – and freeing exercises like Ad Agency, Your Local Library, and Family Portraits – you’ll soon be an idea machine. With Improv for Writers, your creative storytelling well will never run dry again.
Writing | TP | $24.99

Mind Blown
Marshall, Dan
Did you know space is only an hour’s drive away? Did you know there is a jellyfish that is biologically immortal? Or that of all life that has ever existed on Earth, 99.9% of it is extinct? Dan Marshall’s slick new book is packed to the brim with facts that will blow your mind.
Science | HC | $29.99

The Art of Invisibility: the World’s Most Famous Hacker
Teaches You How to Be Safe in the Age of Big Brother and Big Data

Mitnick, Kevin & Vamosi, Robert
Kevin Mitnick, the world’s most famous hacker, teaches you easy cloaking and counter-measures for citizens and consumers in the age of Big Brother and Big Data. Like it or not, your every move is being watched and analysed. Consumer’s identities are being stolen, and a person’s every step is being tracked and stored. What once might have been dismissed as paranoia is now a hard truth, and privacy is a luxury few can afford or understand. In this explosive yet practical book, Kevin Mitnick illustrates what is happening without your knowledge – and he teaches you ‘the art of invisibility’. Mitnick is the world’s most famous – and formerly the Most Wanted – computer hacker. He has hacked into some of the country’s most powerful and seemingly impenetrable agencies and companies, and at one point he was on a three-year run from the FBI. Now, though, Mitnick is reformed and is widely regarded as the expert on the subject of computer security. He knows exactly how vulnerabilities can be exploited and just what to do to prevent that from happening. In The Art of Invisibility, Mitnick provides both online and real life tactics and inexpensive methods to protect you and your family, in easy step-by-step instructions. He even talks about more advanced ‘elite’ techniques, which, if used properly, can maximise your privacy. Invisibility isn’t just for superheroes – privacy is a power you deserve and need in this modern age.
Technology | PBK | $24.99

The Best Australian Science Writing 2019
Nogrady, Bianca (editor)
Good science writing makes us feel. It makes us delight in the discovery of a black hole munching on a star, laugh at the image of aliens puzzling over golf balls on the Moon, wonder at the mystery of the Spanish influenza’s deadly rampage, grieve for baby shearwater chicks dying with plastic-filled stomachs, rage at the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, and cheer for the clitoris’ long-overdue scientific debut. This ninth edition of The Best Australian Science Writing showcases the most powerful, insightful and brilliant essays and poetry from Australian writers and scientists. It roams the length and breadth of science, revealing how a ceramic artist is helping to save the handfish, what is so dangerous about the hype around artificial intelligence, and whether too much exercise is bad for the heart. It makes us think, feel and, hopefully, act.
Science | TP | $29.99

Space Exploration: a History in 100 Objects
Odenwald, Sten
This eclectic pop history of space exploration, by scientist-educator Sten Odenwald at NASA, examines 100 objects – all stunningly photographed – and their effect on what we know and how we think about space. Whimsical and uniquely clarifying, Space Exploration: A History in 100 Objects covers the iconic, from Sputnik to Skylab, as well as the lesser-known but utterly important: the ancient Greek Antikythera mechanism, the first known analogue computer, which predicted astronomical movement; Luna 3, the first satellite to glimpse the far side of the moon; the O-ring; the humble, rubber part that doomed the Space Shuttle Challenger; Syncom 2, the first geosynchronous satellite, which made international TV possible; the V-2 rocket, the first artificial object to cross the threshold of space – and many more!
Science/History | HC | $39.99

Breakfast with Einstein: the Exotic Physics of Everyday Objects
Orzel, Chad
Just beneath the surface of our ordinary lives, strange phenomena lurk. Exciting physics doesn’t only show up in the Big Bang, or a black hole, or in the guts of giant particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider – it’s all around us. Beginning at sunrise, Chad Orzel embarks upon a fascinating tour of the exotic science that underlies each moment of our every day. Did you know your alarm clock held secrets about quantum mechanics? And that the GPS on your phone has a built-in correction for the effects of relativity? In Breakfast with Einstein, the ordinary becomes extraordinary, everything is possible, and the day’s end will find us dazzled.
Science | PBK | $22.99

A Game of Birds and Wolves: the Secret Game that Won the War
Parkin, Simon
1941. The Battle of the Atlantic is a disaster. Thousands of supply ships ferrying vital food and fuel from North America to Britain are being torpedoed by German U-boats. Prime Minister Winston Churchill is lying to the country about the number of British ships sunk. He is lying about the number of British men killed. And worst of all, unless something changes, he knows that Britain is weeks away from being starved into surrender to the Nazis. This is the story of the game of battleships that won the Second World War. In the first week of 1942, a group of unlikely heroes – a retired naval captain and a clutch of brilliant young women, the youngest only seventeen years old – gather to form a secret strategy unit. On the top floor of a bomb-bruised HQ in Liverpool, the Western Approaches Tactical Unit spends days and nights designing and playing war games in an effort to crack the U-boat tactics. A Game of Birds and Wolves takes us from the sweltering fug of a U-boat as the German aces coordinate their wolf pack, to the tense atmosphere of the operation room as the British team plot battles at sea on the map. The story of Operation Raspberry and its unsung heroines has never been told before. Investigative journalist Simon Parkin brings these hidden figures into the light and shows the ingenuity, perseverance, and love needed to defeat the Nazis in this gripping tale of war at sea.
Military history | TP | $32.99

The Astronaut Selection Test Book: Do You Have What it Takes for Space?
Peake, Tim & the European Space Agency
Have you got what it takes to be an astronaut? This book will help readers of all ages find out. Featuring 100 real astronaut tests and exercises from the European Space Agency’s rigorous selection process, ranging from easy to fiendishly hard, The Astronaut Selection Test Book goes where no puzzle book has gone before. Including puzzles and tests on: visual perception and logic; mental arithmetic and concentration; psychological readiness; teamwork and leadership; survival, physical and medical skills; foreign languages (every astronaut has to know Russian!); and much more. This richly illustrated book draws on Tim Peake’s first-hand experience of applying to be an astronaut in 2008, when he and five others were chosen – out of over 8,000 applications! We’ve all dreamed of being an astronaut, though of the estimated 100 billion people who have ever lived, only 557 people have travelled to space. But with this unprecedented look into real astronaut selection, you might just find out your dreams can become reality…
Puzzles | TP | $29.99

Primitive Technology:
a Survivalist’s Guide to Building Tools, Shelters and More in the Wild

Plant, John
Alongside the unlikely internet cult star, Primitive Technology, learn how to make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials… Disconnect from digital and reconnect with your inner caveman. Build. Cook. Hunt. Heat. Survive. Could you thrive in the wilderness? The most primitive human skills unite us all, yet we live in an age more detached than ever. Reconnect with the earth and learn how to build things by hand from scratch, guided by the creator of the world’s most popular primitive technology YouTube channel, John Plant. Watched by millions online, this is the first time Primitive Technology’s ancient methods, rooted in fire, stone, earth, water and plants, have been comprehensively laid out in a book. Through illustrations, photographs and instruction, learn how to create something useful from natural resources and become skilled in the art of fire starting, pottery making, shelter building, spear throwing, basket crafting and much more. Whether you are a seasoned survivalist, a lover of the outdoors, or an armchair admirer, these primitive crafts teach us all something about the fundamentals of human life on earth.
Survivalism | TP | $35.00

1956: the year Australia welcomed the world
Richardson, Nick
An engrossing account of a pivotal year in Australia’s history. This book debunks one of the hardiest clichés in Australian history: that the 1950s was a dull decade, when the nation seemed only interested in a quiet life, a cup of tea, and a weekend drive. The truth is that, by the time the‘60s came around, Australia was already expanding its outlook – politically, economically, and culturally – and central to this were the events of 1956. This was the year when Melbourne hosted the Summer Olympics, the first edition of the Games to be held outside Europe and North America. It also heralded the arrival of television in Australia. In this year, Prime Minister Robert Menzies grappled with world politics, when he opened the country’s doors to refugees from the Hungarian uprising, allowed British nuclear tests at Maralinga, and tried to resolve the greatest diplomatic episode of the decade: the Suez Crisis. In these ways and more, the world came to Australia’s doorstep in 1956, challenging rusted-on habits and indelibly shifting the nation’s perception of itself. Nick Richardson peels back the layers to reveal Australia at a critical moment in time. He brilliantly recreates the broader events surrounding the Melbourne Olympics at the end of 1956, as well as the dramas of the Games themselves. Throughout, he also follows a range of men and women who were touched by this transformation, to illuminate the personal consequences of being part of Australia’s pivotal year.
History | TP | $35.00

When You Kant Figure It Out, Ask a Philosopher
Robert, Marie
Advice for modern dilemmas from the greatest Western philosophers. How can Kant comfort you when you get dumped via text message? How can Aristotle cure your hangover? How can Heidegger make you feel better when your dog dies? When You Kant Figure It Out, Ask a Philosopher explains how pearls of wisdom from the greatest Western philosophers can help us face and make light of some of the daily challenges of modern life. In twelve clever, accessible chapters, you’ll get advice from Epicurus about how to disconnect from constant news alerts and social media updates, Nietzsche’s take on getting in shape, John Stuart Mill’s tips for handling bad birthday presents, and many other ancient pearls of wisdom to help you navigate life today. Hilarious, practical, and edifying, When You Kant Figure It Out, Ask a Philosopher brings the best thinkers of the past into the 21st century to help us all make sense of a chaotic new world.
Philosophy | HC | $26.99

Leadership in War: Lessons from Those Who Made History
Roberts, Andrew
A comparison of nine leaders who led their nations through the some of greatest wars the world has ever seen and whose unique strengths – and weaknesses – shaped the course of human history. Taking us from the French Revolution to the Cold War and the Falklands, Andrew Roberts presents us with a bracingly honest and insightful look at nine major figures in modern history: Napoleon Bonaparte, Horatio Nelson, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, George C Marshall, Charles de Gaulle, Dwight D Eisenhower, and Margaret Thatcher. Each of these leaders fundamentally shaped the outcome of the war their nation was embroiled in. How were they alike, and in what ways did they differ? Was their war leadership unique, or did these leaders have something in common, traits and techniques that transcend time and place and can be applied to the fundamental nature of conflict? Meticulously researched and compellingly written, Leadership in War presents readers with fresh, complex portraits of leaders who approached war with different tactics and different weapons, but with the common goal of success in the face of battle. Both inspiring and cautionary, these portraits offer important lessons on leadership in times of struggle. With his trademark verve and incisive observation, Roberts reveals the qualities that doom even the most promising leaders to failure, and the qualities that lead to victory.
History | HC | $55.00

Who Owns History? Elgin’s Loot and the Case for Returning Plundered Treasure
Robertson, Geoffrey
Geoffrey Robertson focuses his razor-sharp mind on one of the greatest contemporary issues in the worlds of art and culture: the return of cultural property taken from its country of creation. Hard on the heels of his autobiography Rather His Own Man, one of Australia’s foremost public intellectuals turns his mind to one of the most important contemporary questions that divides the world of art and culture: the restitution of heritage treasures removed in earlier times from subjugated peoples, who now want them back. Taking his cue from Cicero, the great Roman barrister, Geoffrey Robertson argues that justice requires the return not only of the ‘Elgin’ Marbles to Greece, but of many looted antiquities on display in the museums of Britain, Europe, and America. He argues that the Gweagal Shield – dropped when Cook shot at Aboriginals in Botany Bay, in 1770 – should be returned to Australia from the British Museum. He wants the government to acquire the hull of HMS Endeavour recently located off Rhode Island. He has located Arthur Phillip’s tombstone for Yemmerrawanne, the first Australian expatriate, in a South London churchyard, and he wants to bring it back. Robertson’s judgement is uncompromising: cultural heritage belongs to the people of whose history it is a part, unless its return would be attended by danger to the artwork itself. And since the movement for the restitution of cultural property is based on human rights, governments that want it back must show respect for the rights of the peoples, on whose behalf they make the claim. Who Owns History? not only delves into the crucial debate over the Marbles, but examines how the past can be experienced by everyone, as well as by the people of the country of origin.
History/Human Rights | HC | $39.99

A Small Illustrated Guide to the Universe
Sanders, Ella Frances
Have you ever found yourself wondering what we might have in common with stars, or why the Moon never leaves us? Thinking about the precise dancing of planets, the passing of time, or the nature of natural things? Our world is full of unshakeable mystery, and although we live in a civilisation more complicated than ever, there is simplicity and reassurance to be found in knowing how and why. From the bestselling creator of Lost in Translation, this is a delicately existential, beautifully illustrated, and welcoming exploration of the universe – one that examines and marvels at the astonishing principles, laws, and phenomena that we exist alongside, that we sit within.
Science | HC | $24.99

Art (Vintage Minis)
Schama, Simon
‘Great art has dreadful manners… The hushed reverence of the gallery can fool you into believing masterpieces are visions that soothe, charm and beguile, but actually they are thugs. Merciless and wily, the greatest paintings grab you in a headlock and proceed in short order to rearrange your sense of reality.’ In inimitable style, our greatest historian and master storyteller Simon Schama makes an irresistible case for the power of art and its necessary place in our lives, examining art through the prism of the troubling life and works of Italian master painter, and murderer, Caravaggio. Selected from The Power of Art. Vintage Minis bring you the world’s greatest writers on the experiences that make us human – from birth to death and everything in between.
Art appreciation | PBK | $7.99

Power and the People: Five Lessons from the Birthplace of Democracy
Scott, Alev & Makres, Andronike
Democracy was born in Athens. From its founding myths to its golden age and its chaotic downfall, it’s rich with lessons for our own times. Why did vital civil engagement and fair debate descend into paralysis and populism? Can we compare Creon to Trump, Demokratia to the American Constitution or Demosthenes’ On the Crown to the Brexit campaign? And how did a second referenda save the Athenians from a bloodthirsty decision? With verve and acuity, the heroics and the critics of Athenian democracy are brought to bear on today’s politics, revealing in all its glories and its flaws the system that still survives to execute the power of the people.
Politics | HC | $35.00

You Look Like a Thing and I Love You:
How Artificial Intelligence Works and Why It’s Making the World a Weirder Place

Shane, Janelle
AI is the technology of the future, but how does it actually work? A hilarious, transporting look under the hood of the technology that’s changing the world – and why it’s dumber than we think. AI is everywhere. It powers the autocorrect function of your iPhone, helps Google Translate understand the complexity of language, and interprets your behaviour to decide which of your friends’ Facebook posts you most want to see. In the coming years, it’ll perform medical diagnoses and drive your car – and, maybe, even help our authors write the first lines of their novels. But how does it actually work? Scientist and engineer, Janelle Shane, is the go-to contributor about computer science for the New York Times, Slate, and the New Yorker. Through her hilarious experiments, real-world examples, and illuminating cartoons, she explains how AI understands our world, and what it gets wrong. More than just a working knowledge of AI, she hands readers the tools to be sceptical about claims of a smarter future. A comprehensive study of the cutting-edge technology that will soon power our world, You Look Like a Thing and I Love You is an accessible and hilarious exploration of the future of technology and society. It’s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry meets Thing Explainer: an approachable guide to a fascinating scientific topic, presented with clarity, levity, and brevity by an expert in the field with a powerful and growing platform.
Technology | TP | $32.99

In Defence of Open Society
Soros, George
The legendary philanthropist tackles the dangers we must face for the survival of civilisation… George Soros – universally known for his philanthropy, progressive politics and investment success, and now under sustained attack from the far right, nationalists, and anti-Semites around the world – gives an impassioned defence of his core belief in open society. George Soros is among the world’s most prominent public figures. He is one of the history’s most successful investors and his philanthropy, led by the Open Society Foundations, has donated over $14 billion to promote democracy and human rights, in more than 120 countries. But in recent years, Soros has become the focus of sustained right-wing attacks in the United States and around the world based on his commitment to open society, progressive politics and his Jewish background. In this brilliant and spirited book, Soros offers a compendium of his philosophy, a clarion call to arms for the ideals of an open society: freedom, democracy, rule of law, human rights, social justice, and social responsibility as a universal idea. In this age of nationalism, populism, anti-Semitism, and the spread of authoritarian governments, Soros’ mission to support open societies is as urgent as it is important.
Society and culture | TP | $32.99

Information Wars:
How We Lost the Global Battle Against Disinformation and What We Can Do About It

Stengel, Richard
Disinformation is as old as humanity. When Satan told Eve nothing would happen if she bit the apple… that was disinformation. But the rise of social media has made disinformation even more pervasive and pernicious in our current era. In a disturbing turn of events, governments are increasingly using disinformation to create their own false narratives, and democracies are proving not to be very good at fighting it. During the final three years of the Obama administration, Richard Stengel, the former editor of Time and an Under Secretary of State, was on the front lines of this new global information war. At the time, he was the single person in government tasked with unpacking, disproving, and combating both ISIS’ messaging and Russian disinformation. Then, in 2016, as the presidential election unfolded, Stengel watched as Donald Trump used disinformation himself, weaponising the grievances of Americans who felt left out by modernism. In fact, Stengel quickly came to see how all three players had used the same playbook: ISIS sought to make Islam great again; Putin tried to make Russia great again; and we all know about Trump. In a narrative that is by turns dramatic and eye-opening, Information Wars walks readers through of this often-frustrating battle. Stengel moves through Russia and Ukraine, Saudi Arabia and Iraq, and introduces characters from Putin to Hillary Clinton, John Kerry and Mohamed bin Salman to show how disinformation is impacting our global society. He illustrates how ISIS terrorised the world using social media, and how the Russians launched a tsunami of disinformation around the annexation of Crimea – a scheme that became the model for their interference with the 2016 presidential election. An urgent book for our times, Information Wars stresses that we must find a way to combat this ever-growing threat to democracy.
Politics/Technology | HC | $35.00

Brilliant Maps: an Atlas for Curious Minds
Wright, Ian
Which nations have North Korean embassies? What percentage of young people live with their families? Which country lists volleyball as its national sport? How much does it cost to get a pint around the world? And where can you find lions in the wild? Revelatory, thought-provoking and fun, Brilliant Maps is a unique atlas of culture, history, politics and miscellanea, compiled by the editor of the iconic Brilliant Maps website. As visually arresting as Information is Beautiful and as full of surprising facts and figures as any encyclopaedia, Brilliant Maps is a stunning piece of cartography that maps our curious and varied planet. For graphic design enthusiasts, compulsive Wikipedia readers and those looking for the sort of gift they buy for someone else and wind up keeping for themselves, this book will change the way you see the world and your place in it.
Geography | HC | $39.99

Dogfight over Tokyo:
the Final Air Battle of the Pacific and the Last Four Men to Die in World War II

Wukovits, John
From an expert in the Pacific theatre of World War II comes the tragic story of the pilots who fought the last fight of the war during the first hour of peace… When Billy Hobbs and his fellow Hellcat aviators from Air Group 88 lifted off from the venerable Navy carrier USS Yorktown early on the morning of August 15, 1945, they had no idea they were about to carry out the final air mission of World War II. Two hours later, Yorktown received word from Admiral Nimitz that the war had ended and that all offensive operations should cease. As they were turning back, twenty Japanese planes suddenly dove from the sky above them and began a ferocious attack. Four American pilots never returned – men who had lifted off from the carrier in wartime, but were shot down during peacetime. Drawing on participant letters, diaries, and interviews, newspaper and radio accounts, and previously untapped archival records, historian and prolific author of acclaimed Pacific theatre books, including Tin Can Titans and Hell from the Heavens, John Wukovits tells the story of Air Group 88’s pilots and crew through their eyes. Dogfight Over Tokyo is written in the same riveting, edge-of-your-seat style that has made Wukovits’ previous books so successful. This is a stirring, one-of-a-kind tale of naval encounters, and the last dogfight of the war – a story that is both inspirational and tragic.
Aviation history | HC | $39.99