Non-Fiction Catalogue: March 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in March 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

Rolling Thunder 1965–68: Johnson’s air war over Vietnam (Air Campaign)
Hallion, Richard P & Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
Operation Rolling Thunder was the campaign that was meant to keep South Vietnam secure, and dissuade the North from arming and supplying the Viet Cong. It pitted the world’s strongest air forces against the MiGs and missiles of a small Soviet client state. But the US airmen who flew Rolling Thunder missions were crippled by a badly thought-out strategy, rampant political interference in operational matters, and aircraft optimised for Cold War nuclear strikes rather than conventional warfare. Ironically, Rolling Thunder was one of the most influential episodes of the Cold War – its failure spurring the 1970s’ US renaissance in professionalism, fighter design, and combat pilot training. Dr Richard P Hallion, one of America’s most eminent air power experts, explains how Rolling Thunder was conceived and fought, and why it became shorthand for how not to fight an air campaign.
Military/aviation history | PBK | $27.99

Early US Armor: Armored Cars 1915–40 (New Vanguard 254)
Zaloga, Steven J & Rodríguez, Felipe (illustrator)
The first American armoured cars began to emerge around the turn of the century, seeing their first military use in 1916, during the Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa. When the United States entered World War I, the American Expeditionary Forces used some armoured cars in France, and American armoured cars were used by the French Army. The inter-war years saw considerable innovation and experimentation in armoured car design. Of the 1930s’ scout car designs, the M3A1 scout car was good enough to be produced in very large numbers in World War II, and was widely exported to many other armies via Lend-Lease. It also served as the basis for the late M2 and M3 armoured half-tracks. In this study, using detailed full colour plates and rigorous analysis, US armour expert Steven J Zaloga chronicles the development of the US armoured car in the years leading up to World War II.
Military history | PBK | $19.99

Concorde Pocket Manual
Johnstone-Bryden, Richard
First flown in 1969, Concorde was the first supersonic aircraft to go into commercial service in 1976 and made her final flight in 2003. She was operated primarily by British Airways and Air France. British Airways’ Concordes made just under 50,000 flights and flew more than 2.5 million passengers, supersonically. A typical London to New York crossing would take a little less than three and a half hours, compared to around eight hours for a ‘subsonic flight’. In November 1986 a Concorde flew around the world, covering 28,238 miles in 29 hours, 59 minutes. Today, Concordes can be viewed at museums across the UK and in France, including at IWM Duxford, Brooklands, and Fleet Air Arm Museum, as well as at Heathrow, Manchester and Paris-Orly airports. However, there have been recent reports suggesting a Concorde may start operating commercially, again. Through a series of key documents, the book tells the story of how the aircraft was designed and developed; as well as ground-breaking moments in her commercial history.
Aviation history | HC | $17.00

Morning Star, Midnight Sun: The Early Guadalcanal-Solomons’ Campaign of World War II August–October 1942
Cox, Jeffrey
Following the disastrous Java Sea campaign, the Allies went on the offensive in the Pacific, in a desperate attempt to halt the Japanese forces that were rampaging across the region. With the conquest of Australia a very real possibility, the stakes were high. Their target: the Japanese-held Solomon Islands, in particular, the southern island of Guadalcanal. Hamstrung by arcane pre-war thinking and a bureaucratic mind-set, the US Navy had to adapt on the fly in order to compete with the mighty Imperial Japanese Navy, whose ingenuity and creativity, thus far, had fostered the creation of its Pacific empire. Starting with the amphibious assault on Savo Island, the campaign turned into a struggle of attrition, where the evenly-matched foes sought to grind out a victory. Following on from his hugely-successful book Rising Sun, Falling Skies, Jeffrey R Cox tells the gripping story of the first Allied offensive of the Pacific War, as they sought to prevent Japan from cutting off Australia and regaining dominance in the Pacific.
Military/naval history | HC | $49.99

World War II Vichy French Security Troops (Men-at-Arms 516)
Cullen, Stephen M & Stacey, Mark (illustrator)
After the Fall of France in 1940, a new puppet state was set up in the south. Officially known as the French State, it is better known as Vichy France. This collaborationist Vichy regime’s armed forces were more active and, usually, more numerous than German troops in the task of hunting down and crushing the maquis – the French Resistance guerrilla forces. This book will cover the organisation and operations of Vichy French Security Forces, including: the new Vichy Police Nationale; particularly, their Groupes Mobiles de Reserve, the Service d’Ordre Légionnaire, and the Milice Francaise, a ruthless anti-Resistance militia armed partly with British weapons captured from SOE airdrops. Fully illustrated throughout, with contemporary photographs and commissioned artwork, it tells the story of Occupied France, from the perspective of those who sought to keep it in German hands.
Military history | PBK | $22.99

Savoia-Marchetti S.79 Sparviero Bomber Units (Combat Aircraft 122)
Mattioli, Marco & Caruana, Richard (illustrator)
Initially developed by Savoia-Marchetti as a transport, the aircraft had evolved into a dedicated medium bomber by the time the S.79-I made its combat debut in the Spanish Civil War in 1936. During World War II, it became Italy’s most successful bomber, and the most produced, with around 1370 built, between 1936 and early 1944. Although initially hampered by poor tactics, the S.79 bomber crews, nonetheless, scored sunk a number of Allied vessels; and provided a constant threat to Allied sailors in the Mediterranean, in the early stages of the war. In East Africa and the Red Sea, the Sparvieri were the most modern bombers in-theatre, proving a challenge to RAF and SAAF biplane fighters. Using specially-commissioned, full-colour artwork, first-hand accounts and historic photographs, this volume chronicles the history of the S.79’s War in the Mediterranean, North African, Balkan, and East African theatres.
Military/aviation history | PBK | $27.99

The Anti-Tank Rifle (Weapon 60)
Zaloga, Steven J & Shumate, Johnny (illustrator) & Gilliland, Alan (illustrator)
The emergence of the tank in World War I led to the development of the first infantry weapons to defend against tanks. Anti-tank rifles became commonplace in the inter-war years and in the early campaigns of World War II in Poland and the Battle of France, which saw renewed use in the form of the British .55in Boys anti-tank rifle – also used by the US Marine Corps, in the Pacific. The French campaign made it clear that the day of the anti-tank rifle was ending due to the increasing thickness of tank armour. Nevertheless, anti-tank rifles continued to be used by the Soviets on the Eastern Front with two rifles, the 14.5mm PTRS and PTRD, and were still in widespread use in 1945. They served again with Korean and Chinese forces in the Korean War, and some have even appeared in Ukraine in 2014–15. Fully illustrated and drawing upon a range of sources, this is the absorbing story of the anti-tank rifle, the infantryman’s anti-armour weapon during the world wars.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

T-90 Standard Tank: The First Tank of the New Russia (New Vanguard)
Zaloga, Steven J & Rodríguez, Felipe (illustrator)
In the wake of the T-72 tank’s poor performance in the 1991 Gulf War, the Kremlin instructed the Russian tank industry to drop the discredited T-72 designation, in favour of the T-90 Vladimir. The T-90 was in fact a further evolution of the T-72 family, but the name change represented an important break in Russian/Soviet tank design history. The T-90 has become the principal export tank of Russia; and is in service in large numbers in many countries, including Algeria, India, and many of the former Soviet republics. Using detailed illustrations and full colour artwork, this book will also describe the evolution of the T-90s many failed successors including the little known Bokser, Molot, and T-95, as well as its likely successor, the new T-14 Armata, and the wide range of specialised vehicles, based on the T-90 chassis such as the formidable Terminator tank support vehicle.
Military history | PBK | $22.99

The Kuban 1943: The Wehrmacht’s last stand in the Caucasus Campaign
Forczyk, Robert & Noon, Steve (illustrator)
In the summer of 1942, the Wehrmacht invaded the Caucasus, in order to overrun critical oil production facilities at Maikop, Grozny, and Baku. However, the Red Army stopped the Germans short of their objectives and then launched a devastating winter counteroffensive that encircled them at Stalingrad. Consequently, Hitler grudgingly ordered an evacuation from the Caucasus, but ordered 17. Armee to fortify the Kuban bridgehead and hold it at all costs, in order to leave open the possibility of future offensives. On the other side, the Soviet Stavka ordered the North Caucasus Front and the Black Sea Fleet – to eliminate the Kuban bridgehead, as soon as possible. The stage was set for a contest between an immovable object and an unstoppable force. With the help of stunning specially commissioned artwork, this book tells the enthralling story of the impressive but strategically foolish German stand at Kuban, which tied down seven Soviet armies in a sideshow battle of attrition, which the Soviets dubbed ‘the Kuban meat grinder’.
Military history | PBK | $29.99

Tanks: 100 years of evolution
Ogorkiewicz, Richard
From an internationally-acclaimed expert in the field comes a detailed, analytical and comprehensive account of the worldwide evolution of tanks, from their inception a century ago, to the present day. With new ideas stemming from the latest academic research, this study presents a reappraisal of the development of tanks and their evolution during World War I and how the surge in technological development during World War II and the subsequent Cold War drove developments in armour in Europe and America, transforming tanks into fast, resilient and powerful fighting machines. From the primitive, bizarre-looking Mark V to the Matilda and from the menacing King Tiger to the superlative M1 Abrams, Professor Ogorkiewicz shows how tanks gradually acquired the enhanced capabilities that enabled them to become what they are today – the core of combined-arms, mechanised warfare.
Military history | PBK | $22.99

Malta 1940–42: The Axis’ air battle for Mediterranean supremacy (Air Campaign)
Noppen, Ryan K & Turner, Graham (illustrator)
In 1940, the strategically vital island of Malta was Britain’s last toehold in the central Mediterranean, wreaking havoc among Axis shipping. Launching an air campaign to knock Malta out of the war, first Italy and then Germany sought to force a surrender or reduce the defences enough to allow an invasion. Drawing on original documents, multilingual aviation analyst Ryan Noppen explains how technical and tactical problems caused the original Italian air campaign of 1940–41 to fail, and then how the German intervention came close to knocking Malta out of the war. Using stunning full-colour artwork, this fascinating book explains why the attempt by the Axis powers to take the British colony of Malta ultimately failed.
Military/aviation history | PBK | $27.99

 

General non-fiction

Bad Choices: How Algorithms Can Help You Think Smarter and Live Happier
Almossawi, Ali
Algorithms – processes that are made up of unambiguous steps and do something useful – make up the very foundations of computer science. Yet, they also inform our choices in approaching everyday tasks, from managing a pile of clothes fresh out of the dryer to deciding what music to listen to. With Bad Choices, Ali Almossawi, presents twelve scenes from everyday life that help demonstrate and demystify the fundamental algorithms that drive computer science, bringing these seemingly elusive concepts into the understandable realms of the everyday. Readers will discover how: matching socks can teach you about search and hash tables; planning trips to the store can demonstrate the value of stacks; deciding what music to listen to shows why link analysis is all important; crafting a succinct tweet draws on ideas from compression; making your way through a grocery list helps explain priority queues and traversing graphs; and more. As you better understand algorithms, you’ll also discover what makes a method faster and more efficient, helping you become a more nimble, creative problem-solver, ready to face new challenges. Bad Choices will open the world of algorithms to all readers making this a perennial go to, for fans of quirky, accessible science books.
Popular science | PBK | $19.99

Squadron: Ending the African Slave Trade
Broich, John
Despite the British being early abolitionists, a significant slave trade remained down the east coast of Africa through the mid-1800s. What further undermined the British Empire was that many of the vessels involved in the trade were themselves British ships. The Royal Navy’s response was to dispatch a squadron to patrol Africa’s coast. Following what began as a simple policing action, this is the story of the four Royal Naval officers who witnessed how rampant the slave trade remained and made it their personal mission to end it. When the disruption of the trade ships started to step on the toes of the wealthy merchant class, the campaign was cancelled. However, in the end a coalition of naval officers and abolitionists forced the British government’s hand into eradicating the slave trade entirely. Squadron grew from historian John Broich’s passion to hunt down first-hand accounts of this untold story. Through research from archives throughout the UK, Broich tells a tale of defiance in the face of political corruption, while delivering thrills in the tradition of high-seas’ heroism.
History –slavery/naval history | HC | $36.99

The Locomotive of War: Money, Empire, Power, and Guilt
Clarke, Peter
‘War, comrades,’ declared Trotsky, ‘is a great locomotive of history.’ He was thought to be acknowledging the opportunity the First World War had offered the Bolsheviks to seize power in Russia in 1917. Twentieth-century warfare, based on new technologies and mass armies, certainly saw the locomotive power of war geared up to an unprecedented level. Peter Clarke explores the crucial ways in which war can be seen as a prime mover of history in the twentieth century, through the eyes of five major figures. In Britain, two wartime prime ministers – first, David Lloyd George; later, Winston Churchill – found their careers made and unmade by the unprecedented challenges they faced. In the United States, two presidents elected in peacetime – Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt – likewise found that war drastically changed their agenda. And it was through the experience of war that the economic ideas of John Maynard Keynes were shaped and came to exert wide influence. When the United States entered the First World War in 1917, President Wilson famously declared: ‘The world must be made safe for democracy.’ This liberal prospectus was to be tested in the subsequent peace treaty, one that was to be bitterly remembered by Germans for its ‘war guilt clause’. But both in the making of the war and the making of the peace the issue of guilt did not suddenly materialise out of thin air. As Clarke’s narrative shows, it was an integral component of the Anglo-American liberal tradition. The Locomotive of War is a forensic and punctilious examination of both the interplay between key figures, in the context of the unprecedented all-out wars of 1914–18 and 1939–45 and the broader dynamics of history in this extraordinary period. Deeply revealing and insightful, it is history of the highest calibre. A Times Literary Supplement Book of the Year for 2017.
History – warfare/politics | PBK | $19.99

Gravitational Waves: How Einstein’s spacetime ripples reveal the secrets of the universe
Clegg, Brian
On 14 September 2015, after 50 years of searching, gravitational waves were detected for the first time and astronomy changed for ever. Until then, investigation of the universe had depended on electromagnetic radiation: visible light, radio, x-rays and the rest. But gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of space and time – are unrelenting, passing through barriers that stop light dead. At the two, four-kilometre-long LIGO observatories in the US, scientists developed incredibly sensitive detectors, capable of spotting a movement 100 times smaller than the nucleus of an atom. In 2015, they spotted the ripples produced by two black holes spiralling into each other, setting spacetime quivering. This was the first time, black holes had ever been directly detected – and it promises far more, for the future of astronomy. Brian Clegg presents a compelling story of human technical endeavour and a new, powerful path to understand the workings of the universe.
Physics | PBK | $19.99

Crew: The story of the men who flew RAAF Lancaster J for Jig
Colman, Mike
On the evening of 24 February 1944, RAAF Lancaster bomber J for Jig took off from an airfield, in Lincolnshire. On board was a crew of seven young men – five Australians, two Scots – whose mission was to bomb factories in Schweinfurt, Germany. But J for Jig never reached its target. It was shot down in the night skies, over France. This book is about the seven lives on that aircraft – who they were, what they did, whom they loved, and whom they left behind. Some were to die that night, and others were to survive, withstanding incredible hardships and adventures as prisoners and evaders in a war that was far from over. Crew brilliantly recreates J for Jig’s final mission; but, more than that, in telling seven individuals’ stories Mike Colman has captured the achievements, loss and the enduring legacy of the generation that fought in the Second World War.
Military/aviation history | TP | $32.99

Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of Our Gendered Minds
Fine, Cordelia
Testosterone Rex is the powerful myth that squashes hopes of sex equality, by telling us that men and women have evolved different natures. Fixed in an ancestral past that rewarded competitive men and caring women, these differences are supposedly re-created in each generation by sex hormones and male and female brains. Testosterone, so we’re told, is the very essence of masculinity, and biological sex is a fundamental force in our development. Not so, says psychologist Cordelia Fine; who shows, with wit and panache, that sex doesn’t create male and female natures. Instead, sex, hormones, culture and evolution work together in ways that make past and present gender dynamics only a serving suggestion for the future – not a recipe. Testosterone Rex brings together evolutionary science, psychology, neuroscience and social history to move beyond old ‘nature versus nurture’ debates, and to explain why it’s time to unmake the tyrannical myth of Testosterone Rex.
Science – genetics/gender | PBK | $22.99

Megatech: Technology in 2050
Franklin, Daniel (editor)
Technology moves fast – so where will it have taken us by 2050? How will it affect the way we live? And how far are we willing to let it go? In Megatech, distinguished scientists, industry leaders, star academics and acclaimed science-fiction writers join journalists from The Economist to explore answers to these questions and more. Twenty experts in the field – including Nobel prize-winner Frank Wilczek, Silicon Valley venture-capitalist Ann Winblad, philanthropist Melinda Gates, and science-fiction author Alastair Reynolds – identify the big ideas, fantastic inventions and potentially sinister trends that will shape our future. Join them to explore a brave new world of brain-computer interfaces, vat-grown cruelty-free meat, knitted cars, and guided bullets. The writers predict the vast changes that technology will bring to everything from food production to health care, energy output, manufacturing, and the military balance. They also consider the impact on jobs, and how we can prepare for the opportunities, as well as the dangers, that await. Thought-provoking, engaging and full of insight from the forefront of tech innovation, Megatech is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand tomorrow’s world.
Technology | PBK | $22.99

Ignorance: Everything You Need to Know about Not Knowing
Graef, Robert
The flipside of knowledge is ignorance. This book explores the vast scope of ignorance, even in an age when we think we know more than ever before. By marking off this ocean of ignorance into manageable categories, the author provides a kind of navigational chart to the unknown, and a series of red flags to all those who claim certitude. The book first lays out the many branches of ignorance – in education, the media, politics, religion, science, and other major institutions. It then assesses the costs and consequences of that ignorance. World conflicts, endemic poverty, environmental damage, waste, racism, and the manipulative forces of industry and politics that use propaganda to manipulate the public may all be seen as rooted in ignorance. But there are positive aspects of ignorance as well. Scientists and artists, by recognising what they don’t know, are spurred on to new creative approaches and discoveries, which would never be found by those too comfortable with the tried and true. The author cites Socrates, whom the Delphic Oracle declared to be the wisest of all people, simply because he realised how much he didn’t know. This book gives you ways to follow in the path that Socrates forged, to counter the closed minds whose false sense of certainty cannot help but distort reality, and to be better prepared to take on even the most serious challenges of today.
Philosophy and logic | TP | $32.99

The German Aces Speak: World War II Through the Eyes of Four of the Luftwaffe’s Most Important Commanders
Heaton, Colin & Lewis, Anne-Marie
For the first time, four German WWII pilots share their side of the story. Few perspectives epitomise the sheer drama and sacrifice of combat more perfectly than those of the fighter pilots of World War II. As romanticised as any soldier in history, the WWII fighter pilot was viewed as larger than life: a dashing soul waging war amongst the clouds. In the sixty-five-plus years, since the Allied victory – stories of these pilots’ heroics have never been in short supply. But what about their adversaries – the highly-skilled German aviators who pushed the Allies to the very brink of defeat? Of all of the Luftwaffe’s fighter aces, the stories of Walter Krupinski, Adolf Galland, Eduard Neumann, and Wolfgang Falck shine particularly bright. In The German Aces Speak, for the first time in any book, these four prominent and influential Luftwaffe fighter pilots reminisce candidly about their service in World War II. Personally interviewed, by author and military historian Colin Heaton, they bring the past to life as they tell their stories about the war, their battles, their lives, and, perhaps most importantly, how they felt about serving under the Nazi leadership of Hermann Göring and Adolf Hitler. From thrilling air battles to conflicts on the ground with their own commanders, the aces’ memories disclose a side of World War II that has gone largely unseen by the Allied public: the experience of the German pilot.
Military/aviation history | TP | $27.99

The German Aces Speak II: World War II Through the Eyes of Four More of the Luftwaffe’s Most Important Commanders
Heaton, Colin & Lewis, Anne-Marie
Heaton and Lewis paint a picture of the war through the eyes of four more of Germany’s most significant pilots – Johannes Steinhoff, Erich Alfred Hartmann, Gunther Rall, and Dieter Hrabak – put together from numerous interviews personally conducted by Heaton – from the 1980s, through the 2000s. The four ex-Luftwaffe fighter aces bring the past to life; as they tell their stories about the war, their battles, their off-duty lives, their lives after the war, and, perhaps most importantly, how they felt about serving under the Nazi leadership of Hermann Göring and Adolf Hitler. Together, the memories of the events captured in The German Aces Speak II continue one of today’s most unique World War II book series, unearthing a facet of the war that has gone widely overlooked for the Allied public.
Military/aviation history | TP | $27.99

The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities
Jones, Paul Anthony
This is the perfect language gift book: a surprising or obscure word for every day of the year. Paul Anthony Jones has unearthed a wealth of wonderful and strange words: dip into this beautifully designed book to be delighted and intrigued throughout the year. Illuminating some aspect of that day, or simply informing and entertaining, each word reveals a story: 1 January: quaaltagh (n.) the first person you meet on New Year’s Day; 2 January: fedifragous (adj.) promise-breaking, oath-violating. In The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities, you might explore etymological origins, learn about linguistic trivia, or wonder at the web of connections within the English language. Written with humour and a light touch that belies the depth of research it contains, this is both a fascinating compendium of etymology and a delightfully entertaining miscellany.
Language | HC | $29.99

The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond
Kaku, Michio
Human civilisation is on the verge of spreading beyond Earth. More than a possibility, it is becoming a necessity: whether our hand is forced by climate change and resource depletion or whether future catastrophes compel us to abandon Earth, one day we will make our homes among the stars. World-renowned physicist and futurist Michio Kaku explores in rich, accessible detail how humanity might gradually develop a sustainable civilisation in outer space. With his trademark storytelling verve, Kaku shows us how science fiction is becoming reality: mind-boggling developments in robotics, nanotechnology, and biotechnology could enable us to build habitable cities on Mars; nearby stars might be reached by microscopic spaceships sailing through space on laser beams; and technology might one day allow us to transcend our physical bodies entirely. With irrepressible enthusiasm and wonder, Dr Kaku takes readers on a fascinating journey to a future in which humanity could finally fulfil its long-awaited destiny among the stars – and perhaps even achieve immortality.
Science/space exploration/society and culture | HC | $49.99

The Mesmerist: The Society Doctor Who Held Victorian London Spellbound
Moore, Wendy
Medicine, in the early 1800s, was a brutal business. Surgery was performed without anaesthesia, while conventional treatment relied on leeches, cupping and toxic potions. Two pioneering men of science aimed to change all this – the progressive physician John Elliotson, and Thomas Wakley, founder of The Lancet magazine. But when the flamboyant Baron Jules Denis Dupotet arrived in London, to promote the latest craze that was sweeping through Europe – mesmerism – the scene was set for an explosive confrontation…
History of medicine | PBK | $22.99

The Darkest Web: Drugs, death and destroyed lives… the inside story of the internet’s evil twin
Ormsby, Eileen
Hitmen for hire, drugs for sale. Inside the dangerous world that lurks beneath the bright, friendly light of your internet screen… A kingpin willing to murder to protect his dark web drug empire. A corrupt government official determined to avoid exposure. The death of a dark web drugs czar in mysterious circumstances in a Bangkok jail cell, just as the author arrives there. Who is Variety Jones and why have darknet markets ballooned tenfold, since authorities shut down the original dark web drugs bazaar, Silk Road? Who are the kingpins willing to sell poisons and weapons, identities and bank accounts, malware and life-ruining services online, to anyone with a wallet full of Bitcoin? A death in Minnesota leads detectives into the world of dark web murder-for-hire – where hundreds of thousands of dollars in Bitcoin is paid to arrange killings, beatings and rapes. Meanwhile, the owner of the most successful hitman website in history is threatening the journalists who investigate his business with a visit from his operatives – and the author is at the top of his list. People with the most depraved perversions gather to share their obscene materials in an almost inaccessible corner of the dark web. A video circulates and the pursuit of the monsters responsible for ‘Daisy’s Destruction’ lead detectives into the unimaginable horror of the world of hurtcore. There’s the world wide web – the internet we all know that connects us via news, email, forums, shopping and social media. Then, there’s the dark web – the parallel internet accessed by only a select few. Usually, those it connects wish to remain anonymous and for good reason.
Internet | TP | $32.99

Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress
Pinker, Steven
If you follow the news, the 21st century doesn’t seem to be going so well. From 9/11 to the Great Recession, the Syrian civil war, the Ebola epidemic, growing inequality, racial unrest, and bitterly contested elections, the world seems to be sinking into chaos and hatred. Moralising commentators tell us that the decline of religious belief and close-knit communities has left us spiritually adrift, without a grounding in moral values, so it’s no wonder we’re suffering through an epidemic of loneliness, unhappiness, and suicide. And then there are the futurologists who speculate on what will finish us off first: resource wars, nuclear annihilation, unstoppable climate change, or robots that steal our jobs, enslave us, and turn us into raw materials. But, as Steven Pinker argues, in this landmark new book, we do not truly inhabit a dystopia of deprivation and violence: in fact, every global measure of human flourishing is on the rise. We’re living longer, healthier, safer, and more affluent lives – not just in the West, but worldwide. Why? In Enlightenment Now, Pinker proposes that human progress is the gift of a coherent value system that many of us embrace without even knowing it. The values of the Enlightenment underlie all our modern institutions; and deserve credit for the stupendous progress we have made. The progress we have enjoyed is not, of course, an excuse for complacency: some of the challenges we face today are unprecedented in their complexity and scope. The way to deal with these challenges, Pinker argues, is to treat them as problems to solve, as we have solved other problems in our past. Putting the case for an Enlightenment newly recharged for the 21st century, Pinker shows how, by using our faculties of reason and sympathy to understand the world and to enhance human flourishing, we can tackle problems that inevitably come with being products of evolution in an entropic universe.
Society and culture | TP | $35.00

Shackleton (Ladybird Expert)
Saunders, Ben
Polar explorer Ben Saunders draws on his own experience of the Antarctic to bring to life the history, dangers and challenges of Shackleton’s Endurance expedition. Inside, you’ll discover how Shackleton, by successfully bringing all his men home in the face of near insurmountable odds, earned his reputation as one of the greatest leaders in history. A clear, simple and enlightening introduction to perhaps the most extraordinary survival stories of all time.
History/exploration/memoir | HC | $19.99

Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City
Sennett, Richard
In this sweeping study, one of the world’s leading thinkers about the urban environment traces the anguished relation between how cities are built and how people live in them, from ancient Athens to 21st century Shanghai. Richard Sennett shows how Paris, Barcelona, and New York City assumed their modern forms; rethinks the reputations of Jane Jacobs, Lewis Mumford, and others; and takes us on a tour of emblematic contemporary locations, from the backstreets of Medellín, Colombia, to the Google headquarters in Manhattan. Through it all, he shows how the ‘closed city’ – segregated, regimented, and controlled – has spread from the global North to the exploding urban agglomerations of the global South. As an alternative, he argues for the ‘open city,’ where citizens actively hash out their differences and planners experiment with urban forms that make it easier for residents to cope. Rich with arguments that speak directly to our moment – a time when more humans live in urban spaces than ever before – Building and Dwelling draws on Sennett’s deep learning and intimate engagement with city life to form a bold and original vision for the future of cities.
Society and culture | HC | $55.00

Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life
Taleb, Nassim Nicholas
Is the pope atheist? Why can a stubborn minority easily end up ruling? Should you take advice from a salesperson? This book is all about why having skin in the game matters. For a society to function properly, those who benefit should also risk something and those who risk something should benefit. Full of philosophical tales and practical stories, Skin in the Game offers a key rule to live by: do not do to others what you don’t want them to do to you, with its practical extension: never take advice from someone who gives advice for a living.
Philosophy/business | TP | $35.00

Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World’s Strangest Brains
Thomson, Helen
Imagine… getting lost in a one-room flat; seeing auras; never forgetting a moment; a permanent orchestra in your head; turning into a tiger; life as an out-of-body experience; feeling another person’s pain; being convinced you are dead; becoming a different person overnight. Our brains are far stranger than we think. We take it for granted that we can remember, feel emotion, navigate, empathise and understand the world around us, but how would our lives change if these abilities were dramatically enhanced – or disappeared overnight? Award-winning science writer Helen Thomson has spent years travelling the world, tracking down incredibly rare brain disorders. In Unthinkable, she tells the stories of nine extraordinary people. From the man who thinks he’s a tiger to the doctor who feels the pain of others just by looking at them, their experiences illustrate how the brain can shape our lives in unexpected and, in some cases, brilliant and alarming ways. Delving into the rich histories of these conditions, exploring the very latest research and cutting-edge medical techniques, Thomson explains the workings of our consciousness, our emotions, our creativity and even the mechanisms that allow us to understand our own existence. Story by remarkable story, Unthinkable takes us on an unforgettable journey through the human brain. Discover how to forge memories that never disappear, how to grow an alien limb and how to make better decisions. Learn how to hallucinate and how to make yourself happier in a split second. Find out how to avoid getting lost, how to see more of your reality, even how exactly you can confirm you are alive. Think the unthinkable.
Neurosciences/popular psychology | TP | $29.99

1941: Politics, Espionage and the Secret Pact between Churchill and Roosevelt
Wortman, Marc
The thrilling story of the hidden war fought by America before they entered World War II, revealing how President Roosevelt aided Churchill in the fight against the Nazis. Prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor, America had long been involved in a shadow war. Winston Churchill, England’s beleaguered new Prime Minister, pleaded with Franklin D Roosevelt for help. President Roosevelt concocted ingenious ways to come to his aid, without breaking the Neutrality Acts. Conducting espionage at home and in South America – to root out Nazi sympathisers – and waging undeclared war in the Atlantic, were just some of the tactics with which America battled Hitler in the shadows. President Roosevelt also had to contend with growing isolationism and anti-Semitism, as he tried to influence public opinion. While Americans were sympathetic to those being crushed under Axis power, they were unwilling to enter a foreign war. Wortman tells the story through the eyes of the powerful as well as ordinary citizens. Their stories weave throughout the intricate tapestry of events that unfold during the crucial year of 1941. Combining military and political history, Wortman tells the eye-opening story of America’s journey to war.
History – military/politics | PBK | $24.99