Non-Fiction Catalogue: July 2019

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in July 2019.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $8.30
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.85
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

Six-Day War 1967:
Operation Focus and the 12 hours that changed the Middle East
(Air Campaign 10)

Aloni, Shlomo & Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
On one day in June, the balance of air power in the Middle East was turned upside down by, perhaps, the most ruthlessly effective air superiority campaign in history – Operation Moked, or Focus. In 1967, the Israeli Air Force was outnumbered more than two to one by the jets of hostile Egypt, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq. Operation Focus was Israel’s ingenious strike plan to overturn the balance. At 0745hrs on June 6, Israeli jets hit Egypt’s airfields simultaneously, first bombing runways and then strafing aircraft. Another 20 follow-up missions were already in the air, initially scheduled to hit every five minutes. This new history of Operation Focus explains how the concept was devised and meticulously planned, the astonishing rate of serviceability and turnaround speed it required from ground crews, and how the relentless tempo of strikes shattered one air force after another. It is the story of how Israel’s victory in the Six-Day War began with a single, shocking day.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

German submarine U-1105 ‘Black Panther’:
the naval archaeology of a U-boat
(general military)

Hamilton, Aaron Stephan
Now, in its final resting place at the bottom of the Potomac River in Maryland, the U-Boat U-1105 is unique among German World War II submarines. Technologically innovative, it was the only U-Boat to conduct a wartime patrol while equipped with the snorkel, GHG Balkon passive sonar and a rubberised coating, known as Alberich – designed to reduce its acoustic signature, and hide from Allied sonar. After the end of World War II, it was the subject of intense testing and evaluation by the Allies, before finally being sunk to the bottom of the Potomac River. This highly-illustrated book uses many new and previously unpublished images to tell the full story of this remarkable U-Boat, evaluating the effectiveness of its late war technologies, document its extensive post-war testing, and detail all the features still present on the wreck site, today.
Naval history | HC | $49.99

US Navy Battleships 1886–98: the pre-dreadnoughts and monitors that fought
the Spanish-American War
(New Vanguard 271)

Herder, Brian Lane & Wright, Paul; Rodríguez, Felipe; Gilliland, Alan (illustrators)
After the American Civil War, the US Navy had been allowed to decay into complete insignificance, yet the commissioning of the modern Brazilian battleship Riachuelo and poor performance against the contemporary Spanish fleet, forced the US out of its isolationist posture towards battleships. The first true US battleships began with the experimental Maine and Texas, followed by the three-ship Indiana class, and the Iowa class, which incorporated lessons from the previous ships. These initial ships set the enduring US battleship standard of being heavily armed and armoured at the expense of speed. This fully-illustrated study examines these first six US battleships, a story of political compromises, clean sheet designs, operational experience, and experimental improvements. These ships directly inspired the creation of an embryonic American military-industrial complex, enabled a permanent outward-looking shift in American foreign policy and laid the foundations of the modern US Navy.
Naval history | PBK | $24.99

Walker Bulldog vs T-54: Laos and Vietnam 1971–75 (Duel 94)
McNab, Chris & Gilliland, Alan; Shumate, Johnny (illustrators)
During the Vietnam War, both the United States and the Soviet Union supplied all manner of weapon systems to the opposing sides, including tanks and armoured vehicles. Two tanks, in particular, took momentary prominence in the later years of the conflict. On the South Vietnamese side, it was the US M41 Walker Bulldog; for the communist North Vietnamese, the Soviet-supplied T-54 main battle tank was the core of their armoured power. In their first major engagement, during Operation Lam Son 719 (February–March 1971), it was the Walker Bulldog in the ascendant, but in later battles the T-54s inflicted heavy losses on their lighter opponents, taking the advantage through their superior manoeuvrability and gunnery. Illustrated with full-colour artwork as well as rare and revealing photographs from both sides, this book studies these two iconic tanks in Vietnamese service, examining how their differing designs and fighting doctrines affected their performance in this unique theatre of combat.
Military history | PBK | $32.99

The Australian Army at War 1976–2016 (Men-at-Arms 526)
Neville, Leigh & Dennis, Peter (illustrator)
Since the end of their involvement in the Vietnam War, the Australian Army has been modernised in every respect. After peacekeeping duties in South-East Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, in the 1980s–90s, ‘Diggers’ were sent to safeguard the newly independent East Timor from Indonesian harassment in 1999; and to provide long-term protection and mentoring since 2006. Australian Army units have served in the US-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Australian Special Forces are currently operating alongside US and British elements against ISIS in northern Iraq. During these campaigns the Australian SAS Regiment and Commandos have fully matured into ‘Tier 1’ assets, internationally recognised for their wide range of capabilities. The book, written by an Australian author who has written extensively about modern warfare, traces the development of the Army’s organisation, combat uniforms, load-bearing equipment, small arms and major weapon systems, using specially-commissioned artwork and photographs.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

F-80 Shooting Star Units of the Korean War (Combat Aircraft 128)
Thompson, Warren & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
Built within a 180-day time limit in 1943, the F-80 Shooting Star first saw service in Italy in the final year of World War 2, and consequently was sent to bases in the US, Europe and the Far East, after VJ Day. It was the latter groups based in Japan that initially bore the brunt of the early fighting in Korea, engaging MiG-15s in the world’s first jet-versus-jet combat. Flown principally by the 8th and 49th Fighter Bomber Wings,
the F-80 served until the end of the war, completing an astonishing 98,515 combat sorties, shooting down 17 aircraft (including three of the vastly superior MiG-15s), dropping over 33,000 tons of bombs, and firing over 80,000 air-to-ground rockets. Aside from the fighter-bomber Shooting Stars, the ultra-rare, but heavily used, photo-reconnaissance RF-80A saw extensive use in the frontline in Korea as a replacement for the vulnerable RF-51D. Filled with first-hand accounts and rare colour photographs taken by the veterans themselves, this is the engrossing story of the pioneering F-80 Shooting Star.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

 

General non-fiction

How Philosophy Works

From Socrates to Jean Paul Sartre, discover the key philosophers and theories which have shaped the way we view the world. Demystifying the key ideas of the world’s greatest philosophers, and exploring all of the most important branches of thought including philosophy of science, philosophy of religion and feminist philosophy in a uniquely visual way, this book is the perfect introduction to the history of philosophy. A clear and accessible guide to philosophy, How Philosophy Works combines bold infographics and jargon-free text to demystify fundamental concepts. Covering everything from ethics to epistemology and phenomenology, the book presents the ideas and theories of key philosophical traditions and philosophers – from Plato and Socrates to Nietzsche and Wittgenstein via Kant – in a novel, easy-to-understand way. Its infographics will help you to understand the elements of philosophy on a conceptual level and, by tackling life’s ‘big questions’, it will help you to look at the world in an entirely new way.
Philosophy | HC | $35.00

How to Draw Magical Mythological Creatures: Create Unicorns, Dragons, Gryphons,
and Other Fantasy Animals from Legend and Your Imagination

Amberlyn, J C
Artists, old and young, enjoy drawing beasts and characters from their favourite fantasy stories. How to Draw Characters from Magic, Myth, and Fantasy continues a rich tradition of mythology and art. In this step-by-step guide to drawing all manner of creatures such as dragons, griffons, fairies, and sea creatures in pencil and pen-and-ink, J C Amberlyn combines her love of fantasy and mythological storytelling with her beautiful, detailed drawing style and love of all non-human creatures. Amberlyn covers all the basics of drawing so that even beginners will feel confident and successful. Included is introductory information on art technique and material basics and detailed, step-by-step instruction on anatomy, features, and finishing details.
Drawing/Art | PBK | $42.99

The Escape Artists: a Band of Daredevil Pilots and the Greatest Prison Breakout of WWI
Bascomb, Neal
July 1918. A band of Allied Royal Flying Corps airmen are determined to escape Germany’s harshest POW camp. Their plan will become the most ambitious mass breakout attempt of the Great War. In the winter trenches and flak-filled skies of World War I, captured soldiers and pilots narrowly avoided death – only to find themselves imprisoned in Germany’s archipelago of brutal POW camps. After several unsuccessful escapes, a group of Allied prisoners of Holzminden – Germany’s land-locked Alcatraz – hatched the most elaborate escape plan, yet known. With ingenious engineering, disguises, forgery, and courage, their story would electrify Britain in some of its darkest hours of the war. Drawing on never-before-seen memoirs and letters, Neal Bascomb brings this little-known story narrative to life, amid the despair of the trenches and the height of patriotic duty.
History | PBK | $22.99

What is Real? the Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics
Becker, Adam
The untold story of the heretical thinkers, who challenged the establishment to rethink quantum physics and the nature of reality. Every physicist agrees quantum mechanics is among humanity’s finest scientific achievements. But ask what it means, and the result will be a brawl. For a century, most physicists have followed Niels Bohr’s Copenhagen interpretation and dismissed questions about the reality underlying quantum physics as meaningless. A mishmash of solipsism and poor reasoning, Copenhagen endured, as Bohr’s students vigorously protected his legacy; and the physics community favoured practical experiments over philosophical arguments. As a result, questioning the status quo long meant professional ruin. And, yet, from the 1920s to today, physicists like John Bell, David Bohm, and Hugh Everett persisted in seeking the true meaning of quantum mechanics. What is Real? is the gripping story of this battle of ideas and the courageous scientists, who dared to stand up for truth.
Science | PBK | $22.99

A Very Human Ending: How suicide haunts our species
Bering, Jesse
This penetrating analysis aims to demystify a subject that knows no cultural or demographic boundaries. Why do people want to kill themselves? Despite the prevalence of suicide in the developed world, it’s a question most of us fail to ask. On hearing news of a suicide we are devastated, but overwhelmingly we feel disbelief. In A Very Human Ending, research psychologist Jesse Bering lifts the lid on this taboo subject, examining the suicidal mindset from the inside out to reveal the subtle tricks the mind can play when we’re easy emotional prey. In raising challenging questions Bering tests our contradictory superstitions about the act itself. Combining cutting-edge research with investigative journalism and first-person testimony, Bering also addresses the history of suicide and its evolutionary inheritance to offer a personal, accessible, yet scientifically sound examination of why we are the only species on earth that deliberately ends its own life.
Psychology | PBK | $22.99

The Weather Machine: How We See Into the Future
Blum, Andrew
Shall we take an umbrella… or evacuate the city? The Weather Machine is about a miraculous-but-overlooked invention that helps us through our daily lives – and sometimes saves them – by allowing us to see into the future. When Superstorm Sandy hit North America, weather scientists had predicted its arrival a full eight days beforehand, saving countless lives and astonishing us with their capability. Their skill is unprecedented in human history and draws on nearly every major invention of the last two centuries: Newtonian physics, telecommunications, spaceflight, and super-computing. In this gripping investigation, Andrew Blum takes us on a global journey to explain this awe-inspiring feat – from satellites circling the Earth, to weather stations far out in the ocean, through some of the most ingenious minds and advanced algorithms at work today. Our destination: the simulated models they have constructed of our planet, which spin faster than time, turning chaos into prediction, offering glimpses of our future with eerie precision. This collaborative invention spans the Earth and relies on continuous co-operation between all nations – a triumph of human ingenuity and diplomacy we too often shrug off as a tool for choosing the right footwear each morning. But in this new era of extreme weather, we may come to rely on its maintenance and survival for our own.
Science | TP | $35.00

Origin Story: a Big History of Everything
Christian, David
How did we get from the Big Bang to today’s staggering complexity, in which seven billion humans are connected into networks powerful enough to transform the planet? And why, in comparison, are our closest primate relatives reduced to near-extinction? Big History creator David Christian gives the answers in a mind-expanding cosmological detective story told on the grandest possible scale. He traces how, during eight key thresholds, the right conditions have allowed new forms of complexity to arise, from stars to galaxies, Earth to homo sapiens, agriculture to fossil fuels. This last mega-innovation gave us an energy bonanza that brought huge benefits to mankind, yet also threatens to shake apart everything we have created. This global origin story is one that we could only begin to tell recently, thanks to the underlying unity of modern knowledge. Panoramic in scope and thrillingly told, Origin Story reveals what we learn about human existence when we consider it from a universal scale.
History | PBK | $22.99

Now You’re Talking:
Human Conversation from the Neanderthals to Artificial Intelligence

Cox, Trevor
Why are human beings the only animals that can speak? And why does it matter? If you’ve ever felt the shock of listening to a recording of your own voice, you realise how important your voice is to your personal identity. We judge others – and whether we trust them – not just by their words, but by the way they talk: their intonation, their pitch, their accent. Now You’re Talking explores the full range of our voice – how we speak and how we sing; how our vocal anatomy works; what happens when things go wrong; and how technology enables us to imitate and manipulate the human voice. Trevor Cox talks to vocal coaches who help people to develop their new voice after a gender transition; to record producers whose use of technology has transformed the singing voice; and to computer scientists who replicate the human voice in their development of artificial intelligence. Beginning with the Neanderthals, Now You’re Talking takes us all the way to the digital age – with the frightening prospect that we may soon hear ‘Unexpected item in the bagging area’, more frequently than a friendly ‘Hello, how are you?’ in the street.
Science | PBK | $22.99

The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonise the Cosmos
Davenport, Christian
The historic quest to rekindle the human exploration, and colonisation of space – led by two rivals and their vast fortunes, egos, and visions of space as the next entrepreneurial frontier. The Space Barons is the story of a group of billionaire entrepreneurs, who are pouring their fortunes into the epic resurrection of the American space program. Nearly a half-century after Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, these Space Barons – most notably Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, along with Richard Branson and Paul Allen – are using Silicon Valley-style innovation to dramatically lower the cost of space travel, and send humans even further than NASA has gone. These entrepreneurs have founded some of the biggest brands in the world – Amazon, Microsoft, Virgin, Tesla, PayPal – and upended industry after industry. Now, they are pursuing the biggest disruption of all: space. Based on years of reporting and exclusive interviews with all four billionaires, this authoritative account is a dramatic tale of risk and high adventure, the birth of a new Space Age – fuelled by some of the world’s richest men; as they struggle to end governments’ monopoly on the cosmos. The Space Barons is also a story of rivalry – hard-charging start-ups, warring with established contractors, and the personal clashes of the leaders of this new space movement, particularly Musk and Bezos; as they aim for the moon and Mars, and beyond.
Biography//Business/Science | PBK | $24.99

Poison: a History – an Account of the Deadly Art and its Most Infamous Practitioners
Davis, Jenni
Poison: A History lifts the lid on 30 notorious cases of poisoning – riveting accounts ranging from Roman poisoning epidemics to the shocking antics of toxic aristocrats in 16th-century Florence and 17th-century Versailles, all the way up to the murder of Alexander Litvinenko, by means of a polonium-laced cup of tea, in 2006. Cases of intentional poisoning have likely been occurring since early humans discovered that a sour aftertaste isn’t the only consequence of snacking on belladonna. In the twenty-first century, the art of the poisoner remains just as creepy, secret, and horribly fascinating as ever. Poison: A History reveals intriguing insights into the poisonous art, including the psyches of the perpetrators. These richly-illustrated stories detail both motive and method, along with body count. The five chapters in this comprehensive overview of poisoning take us from 399 BCE to the present day, in chronological order: Poison in the Ancient World, Medieval Times and the Renaissance, Mid 17th to 18th centuries: ‘The Skills of Witches’, 19th century: The Golden Age of Poisoning, and From Cults to Espionage: the 1970s and Beyond. Plus, Poison: A History includes a timeline on fashions in poison, and a top-20 identifier – to help you steer clear. Poison: A History is a chilling cabinet of poison sure to inform and fascinate.
History/Science | PBK | $19.99

Travels in Atomic Sunshine: Australia and the occupation of Japan
Gerster, Robin
A vivid, salutary study of Australia’s little-known participation in the post-war occupation of Japan. In February 1946, the Australians of the British Commonwealth Occupation Force (BCOF) moved into western Japan to ‘demilitarise and democratise’ the atom-bombed backwater of Hiroshima Prefecture. For over six years, up to 20,000 Australian servicemen, including their wives and children, participated in an historic experiment in nation-rebuilding dominated by the United States and the occupation’s supreme commander, General MacArthur. It was to be a watershed in Australian military history and international relations. BCOF was one of the last collective armed gestures of a moribund empire. The Chifley government wanted to make Australia’s independent presence felt in post-war Asia-Pacific affairs, yet the venture heralded the nation’s enmeshment in American geopolitics. This was the forerunner of today’s peacekeeping missions and engagements in contentious US-led military occupations. Yet, the occupation of Japan was also a compelling human experience. It was a cultural reconnaissance – the first time a large number of Australians were able to explore in depth an Asian society and country. It was an unprecedented domestic encounter between peoples with apparently incompatible traditions and temperaments. Many relished exercising power over a despised former enemy, and basked in the ‘atomic sunshine’ of American Japan. But numerous Australians developed an intimacy with the old enemy, which put them at odds with the ‘Jap’ haters back home, and became the trailblazers of a new era of bilateral friendship.
History | TP | $35.00

The Modern Tarot Reader
Goodchild, Claire
The essential tarot kit for modern mystics. Let award-winning artist and astrologer Claire Goodchild help you to unlock the ancient mysteries of the tarot, as you harness this powerful tool of self-discovery and spiritual growth. This elegant pack comes complete with a hauntingly beautiful tarot deck and a brief guide to the art.
Mysticism | PBK | $39.99

The History of Philosophy
Grayling, A C
The story of philosophy is an epic tale: an exploration of the ideas, views and teachings of some of the most creative minds known to humanity. But since the long-popular classic, Bertrand Russell’s History of Western Philosophy, first published in 1945, there has been no comprehensive and entertaining, single-volume history of this great intellectual journey. With his characteristic clarity and elegance, A C Grayling takes the reader from the world-views and moralities before the age of the Buddha, Confucius, and Socrates, through Christianity’s dominance of the European mind, to the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and on to Mill, Nietzsche, Sartre, and philosophy today. And, since the story of philosophy is incomplete without mention of the great philosophical traditions of India, China and the Persian-Arabic world, he gives a comparative survey of them too. Accessible for students and eye-opening for philosophy readers, he covers epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, logic, the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, political philosophy and the history of debates in these areas of enquiry, through the ideas of the celebrated philosophers as well as less well-known influential thinkers. He also asks what we have learnt from this body of thought, and what progress is still to be made. The first authoritative and accessible one-volume history of philosophy for decades, remarkable for its range and accessibility, this is a landmark work.
Philosophy/History | TP | $32.99

Buzz: the Nature and Necessity of Bees
Hanson, Thor
A superb natural and cultural history of bees – the only such book to celebrate their full diversity. In Buzz, the author takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young. From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They’ve given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers, and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing. As informative and enchanting as the waggle dance of a honeybee, Buzz shows us why all bees are wonders to celebrate and protect. Read this book and you’ll never overlook them again.
Science | TP | $29.99

Booked: a Traveller’s Guide to Literary Locations Around the World
Kreitner, Richard
This practical armchair travel guide explores eighty of the most iconic literary locations – from all over the globe – you can actually visit. A must-have for every fan of literature, Booked inspires readers to follow in their favourite characters footsteps, by visiting the real-life locations portrayed in beloved novels, including the Monroeville, Alabama courthouse in To Kill A Mockingbird; Chatsworth House, the inspiration for Pemberley in Pride and Prejudice; and the Kyoto Bridge from Memoirs of a Geisha. The full-colour photographs throughout reveal the settings readers have imagined, again and again, in their favourite books. Organised by regions all around the world, author Richard Kreitner explains the importance of each literary landmark, including the connection to the author and novel, cultural significance, historical information, and little-known facts about the location. He also includes travel advice, like addresses and must-see spots. Booked features special sections on cities that inspired countless literary works… like a round of locations in Brooklyn – from Betty Smith’s iconic A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, to Jonathan Lethem’s Motherless Brooklyn – and a look at the New Orleans of Tennessee Williams and Anne Rice.
Book culture/Travel | HC | $45.00

A Short History of Seafaring
Lavery, Brian
For more than 5,000 years, the seas have challenged, rewarded, and punished the brave sailors who set forth to explore it. This history of the seas and sailing tells the remarkable story of those individuals – whether they lived to tell the tale themselves… or not. From the early Polynesian seafarers and the first full circumnavigations of the globe, to explorers picking their way through the coral reefs of the West Indies, this book tells the compelling story of life at sea that lies behind man’s search for new lands, new trade, conquest, and uncharted waters. Charting the great milestones of nautical history from the discovery of America to the establishment of the Royal Navy, the naval history of the American Civil War, the Battle of Midway and modern piracy the book sets all of them in their cultural and historical context. A Short History of Seafaring is a unique compendium of awe-inspiring tales of epic sea voyages and great feats of seamanship, navigation, endurance, and ingenuity.
Maritime history | PBK | $19.99

The Spy Who Changed History:
the Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Won the Race for America’s Top Secrets

Lokhova, Svetlana
On the trail of Soviet infiltrator Agent Blériot, Svetlana Lokhova takes the reader on a thrilling journey, through Stalin’s most audacious intelligence operation. On a sunny September day in 1931, a Soviet spy walked down the gangplank of the luxury transatlantic liner SS Europa, and into New York. Attracting no attention, Stanislav Shumovsky had completed his journey from Moscow to enrol at a top American university. He was concealed in a group of 65 Soviet students heading to prestigious academic institutions. But he was after far more than an excellent education. Recognising Russia was 100 years behind the encircling capitalist powers, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had sent Shumovsky on a mission to acquire America’s vital secrets to help close the USSR’s yawning technology gap. The road to victory began in the classrooms and laboratories of MIT – Shumovsky’s destination, soon, became the unwitting finishing school for elite Russian spies. The USSR, first, transformed itself into a military powerhouse able to confront and defeat Nazi Germany. Then, in an extraordinary feat that astonished the West, in 1947 American ingenuity and innovation exfiltrated, by Shumovsky, made it possible to build and unveil the most advanced strategic bomber in the world. Following his lead, other MIT-trained Soviet spies helped acquire the secrets of the Manhattan Project. By 1949, Stalin’s fleet of TU-4s – now, equipped with atomic bombs – could devastate the US on his command. Appropriately codenamed BLÉRIOT, Shumovsky was an aviation spy. Shumovsky’s espionage was so successful that the USSR acquired every US aviation secret from his network of agents in factories and at top secret military research institutes. In this thrilling history, Lokhova pieces together every aspect of Shumovsky’s life and character, using information derived from American and Russian archives, exposing how even Shirley Temple and Franklin D Roosevelt, unwittingly, advanced his schemes.
History/espionage | PBK | $24.99

The Novacene: the Coming Age of Hyperintelligence
Lovelock, James
James Lovelock, creator of the Gaia hypothesis and the greatest environmental thinker of our time has produced an astounding new theory about future of life on Earth. He argues that the Anthropocene – the age in which humans acquired planetary-scale technologies – is, after 300 years, coming to an end. A new age – the Novacene – has already begun. New beings will emerge from existing artificial intelligence systems. They will think 10,000 times faster than we do and they will regard us as we now regard plants – as desperately slow acting and thinking creatures. But this will not be the cruel, violent machine takeover of the planet imagined by sci-fi writers and film-makers. These hyper-intelligent beings will be as dependent on the health of the planet as we are. They will need the planetary cooling system of Gaia to defend us from the increasing heat of the sun as much as we do. And Gaia depends on organic life. We will be partners in this project. It is crucial, Lovelock argues, that the intelligence of Earth survives and prospers. He does not think there are intelligent aliens, so we are the only beings capable of understanding the cosmos. Maybe, he speculates, the Novacene could even be the beginning of a process that will finally lead to intelligence suffusing the entire cosmos. At the age 100, James Lovelock has produced the most important and compelling work of his life.
Environmentalism | HC | $29.99

The Good, the Bad and the Unlikely: Australia’s Prime Ministers
MacCallum, Mungo
Since 1901, thirty different leaders have run the national show. Whether their term was eight days, or eighteen years, each prime minister has a story worth sharing. Edmund Barton united the bickering states in a federation. The unlucky Jimmy Scullin took office days before Wall Street crashed into the Great Depression. John Curtin faced the ultimate challenge of wartime leadership. John Gorton, Gough Whitlam, and Paul Keating each shook up their parties’ policies so vigorously that none lasted much longer than a single term. Harold Holt spent three decades in parliament, only to disappear while swimming off the coast of Victoria just under two years into his first term. John Howard’s ‘triple bypass’ is the stuff of legend. Julia Gillard overthrew Kevin Rudd and Kevin Rudd overthrew Julia Gillard, thus paving the way for Tony Abbott, who was ousted by Malcolm Turnbull – until he too was toppled, this time by Scott Morrison. With characteristic wit and expert knowledge, Mungo MacCallum brings the nation’s leaders to life in this updated edition of a classic book.
History/Politics | TP | $32.99

The Death of the Gods: the New Global Power Grab
Miller, Carl
A ground-breaking examination of the new centres of power and control in the twenty-first century. The old gods are dying. Giant corporations collapse overnight. Newspapers are being swallowed. Stock prices plummet with a tweet. Governments are losing control. The old familiarities are tumbling down and a strange new social order is rising in their place. More crime now happens online, than offline. Facebook has grown bigger than any state, bots battle elections, technologists have reinvented democracy and information wars are breaking out around us. New mines produce crypto-currencies, coders write policy, and algorithms shape our lives in more ways than we can imagine. What is going on? For centuries, writers and thinkers have used power as a prism through which to view and understand the world at moments of seismic change. The Death of the Gods is an exploration of power in the digital age, and a journey in search of the new centres of control today. From a cyber-crime raid in suburbia to the engine rooms of Silicon Valley, and from the digital soldiers of Berkshire to the hackers of Las Vegas, pioneering technology researcher Carl Miller traces how power – the most important currency of all – is being transformed, fought over, won and lost. As power escapes from its old bonds, he shows us where it has gone, the shape it now takes and how it touches each of our lives. Astounding opportunities are at our fingertips. But are we more powerful as individuals than ever before?
Or more controlled?
Society and culture/economics/politics | PBK | $22.99

The Secret Lives of Planets: a User’s Guide to the Solar System
Murdin, Paul
An inside guide, by astronomer Paul Murdin, revealing everything you need to know about the planets, their satellites and our place in the solar system. We have the impression that the solar system is perfectly regular like a clock, or a planetarium instrument. On a short timescale it is. But, seen in a longer perspective, the planets, and their satellites, have exciting lives, full of events – for example, did you know that Saturn’s moon, Titan, boasts lakes which contain liquid methane surrounded by soaring hills and valleys, exactly as the earth did before life evolved on our fragile planet? Or that Mercury is the shyest planet? Or, that Mars’ biggest volcano is 100 times the size of Earth’s, or that its biggest canyon is 10 times the depth of the Grand Canyon, or that it wasn’t always red, but blue? The culmination of a lifetime of astronomy and wonder, Paul Murdin’s enchanting new book reveals everything you ever wanted to know about the planets, their satellites, and our place in the solar system.
Science | HC | $32.99

A Short History of Medicine
Parker, Steve
From traditional Chinese medicine to today’s sophisticated gene therapies and robotic surgery, A Short History of Medicine combines riveting storytelling and beautiful images, historical accounts and lucid explanations, to illuminate the story of medicine through time. Witness early, bloody, anaesthetic-free operations; see the first crude surgical instruments; trace the mapping of the circulatory system; follow the painstaking detective work that led to the decoding of the human genome; and understand the role that potions, cures, therapies, herbal medicines, and drugs have played in the human quest to tame and conquer disease, injury, and death. A Short History of Medicine is an engrossing illustrated history and tale of drama and discovery that celebrates the milestones of medical history across generations and cultures.
History/Medicine & science | PBK | $19.99

Imperial Twilight: the Opium War and the End of China’s Last Golden Age
Platt, Stephen R
The definitive history of the Opium War between Britain and China in the nineteenth century, by an award-winning historian. When Britain declared war on China in 1839, it sealed the fate of what had been, for centuries, the wealthiest and most powerful empire in the world. China was much weaker than was commonly understood and the war set in motion the fall of the Qing dynasty which, in turn, would lead to the rise of nationalism and communism in the twentieth century. Beginning with the very first efforts by the British government to ‘open’ China to trade, Stephen Platt tells the epic story of the decades leading up to the war and, given the growing uncertainty in current relations between China and the West, shows how the conflict still has important implications for the world, today.
History | PBK | $24.99

Tour de Force: the explosive journey from street cop to chief of Australian Border Force
Quaedvlieg, Roman
Roman Quaedvlieg was always destined to make a mark. As a rookie policeman on the mean streets of Fortitude Valley in the dying days of the Moonlight State, his first arrest was Brisbane’s most wanted escapee. Three decades later, he found himself navigating through the corridors of power in Canberra. Tour de Force charts the years in between, during which he truly sees it all. From policing on the beat to going undercover with bikies and gangs, to eventually running covert operations at the Australian Crime Commission, exposing major drug importations while working in customs services and leading the operation to turn back boats on international waters. Right up to being appointed as the very first head of the Australian Border Force, Roman Quaedvlieg’s story is one of a tough, resourceful and disciplined policeman rising through the ranks to the very top of law enforcement in Australia. This is a personal and political story that exposes a deeply conflicted national security system and doesn’t shy away from his notorious sacking from the top job. Tour de Force is a detailed and explosive memoir, revealing a lifelong quest for justice in the face of cronyism, unbridled ambition, politics, and corruption.
Memoir | TP | $34.99

Elon Musk: a Mission to Save the World
Redding, Anna Crowley
Elon Musk is the visionary behind SpaceX and CEO of the electric car company Tesla. He is working on unique and daring improvements to both public transit and solar energy. And then, there’s his highly-publicised plans for colonising Mars… But behind the mind-blowing headlines and legendary drive is the story of a bullied and beaten schoolboy, who through creativity and determination decided to rewrite his story and find his own way to make the world a better place. And to do so with a sense of fun and style. From hosting raves to pay for college to rewriting the rules on space travel, Elon Musk has always gone his own way. And, now, award-winning investigative journalist, Anna Crowley Redding takes readers on a well-researched trip through Elon’s life and accomplishments.
Biography | HC | $29.99

Empire of Democracy: the Remaking of the West since the Cold War, 1971–2017
Reid-Henry, Simon
The first panoramic history of the Western world, from the 1970s to the present day: Empire of Democracy is the story for those asking how we got to where we are. Half a century ago, at the height of the Cold War and amidst a world economic crisis, the Western democracies were forced to undergo a profound transformation. Against what some saw as a full-scale ‘crisis of democracy’ – with race riots, anti-Vietnam marches and a wave of worker discontent – a new political-economic order was devised and the post-war social contract written anew. In this epic narrative of the events that have shaped our own times, Simon Reid-Henry shows how liberal democracy, and Western history with it, was profoundly reimagined when the post-war Golden Age ended. As the institutions of liberal rule were reinvented, a new generation of politicians emerged: Thatcher, Reagan, Mitterrand, and Kohl. The late twentieth-century heyday they oversaw carried the Western democracies triumphantly to victory in the Cold War, ushering in an economic boom and a new spirit of optimism by the millennium. But the war on terror and the high drama of the financial crisis in 2007–8 shone a different light upon the decisions taken to secure capitalist democracy in the 1970s, laying the basis for the anti-liberal surge of recent times: from Viktor Orban and Marine le Pen, to Brexit and Donald Trump. The present crisis of liberalism demands us to revisit these unscripted decades. The era we have lived through is closing out; democracy is turning on its axis once again. As this gripping history reminds us, the choices we make going forward require us, first, to understand where we have been.
History/Geopolitics | TP | $34.99

The Moon: a Celebration of Our Celestial Neighbour
Royal Observatory Greenwich
Marking the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s ‘small step’ this beautiful book explores people’s fascination with our only natural satellite. Published to coincide with Royal Museums Greenwich’s exhibition: The Moon, immerse yourself in contemporary essays and fascinating images, wrapped in a sleek design. Edited by the exhibition’s curators, Melanie Vandenbrouck, Megan Barford, Louise Devoy, and Richard Dunn, this book illuminates how art and science meet, in our profound connection with the Moon. It features authors from a variety of disciplines, including cultural historians, curators, a scientist, a poet and a space law expert among others. Divided into four sections, the first, ‘A Constant Companion’, explores why we started to observe the Moon. ‘Through the Lens’ reveals advancements in technology for observing details not visible with a naked eye. Fifty years after man set foot on the moon, ‘Destination Moon’ explores how the moon was represented before humankind’s first landing. The final section – ‘For All Mankind?’ – reflects on how our relationship with our closest cosmic companion continues to evolve.
Science | HC | $44.99

The Vinyl Frontier: the Story of the Voyager Golden Record
Scott, Jonathan
Have you ever made someone you love a mix-tape? Forty years ago, a group of scientists, artists and writers gathered in a house in Ithaca, New York to work on the most important compilation ever conceived. It wasn’t from one person to another, it was from Earth to the Cosmos. In 1977, NASA sent Voyager 1 and 2 on a Grand Tour of the outer planets. During the design phase of the Voyager mission, it was realised that this pair of plucky probes would eventually leave our solar system to drift forever, in the unimaginable void of interstellar space. With this gloomy-sounding outcome in mind, NASA decided to do something optimistic. They commissioned astronomer Carl Sagan to create a message to be fixed to the side of Voyager 1 and 2 a plaque, a calling card, a handshake to any passing alien that might one day chance upon them. The result was the Voyager Golden Record, a genre-hopping multi-media metal LP. A 90-minute playlist of music from across the globe, a sound essay of life on Earth, spoken greetings in multiple languages and more than 100 photographs and diagrams, all painstakingly chosen by Sagan and his team – to create an aliens’ guide to Earthlings. The record included music by J S Bach and Chuck Berry, a message of peace from US president Jimmy Carter, facts, figures and dimensions, all encased in a golden box. The Vinyl Frontier tells the story of NASA’s interstellar mix-tape, from first phone call to final launch, when Voyager 1 and 2 left our planet – bearing their hopeful message, from the Summer of ’77, to a distant future.
Science/Society and culture | HC | $34.99

The Amusement Park:
900 Years of Thrills and Spills, and the Dreamers and Schemers Who Built Them

Silverman, Stephen M
The electrifying, never-before-told history of amusement parks, from the middle ages to present day, populated by the colourful (and sometimes criminal) characters who built them, and the regular folks who sought their magical – albeit temporary – charms. Step right up! The Amusement Park is a rich, anecdotal history that begins nine centuries ago, with the ‘pleasure gardens’ of Europe and England, and ends with the rise and fall and rise again of some of the most elaborate parks in the world. It’s a history told largely through the stories of the colourful, sometimes hedonistic characters who built them; and features, among many, showmen like Joseph and Nicholas Schenck and Marcus Loew, railroad barons such as Andrew Mellon and Henry E Huntington; and the men who ultimately destroyed the parks, including Robert Moses and Fred Trump. The many gifted artisans and craftspeople who brought these parks to life are also featured, along with an amazing cast of supporting players from Al Capone to Annie Oakley. And, of course, there are the rides, whose marvels of engineering and heart-stopping thrills are celebrated at full throttle. The parks and fairs featured include the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, Coney Island, Steeplechase Park, Dreamland, Euclid Beach Park, Cedar Point, Palisades Park, Ferrari World, Dollywood, Sea World, Six Flags Great Adventure, Universal Studios, Disney World and Disneyland… and many more.
History | HC | $49.99

Do Dice Play God? the Mathematics of Uncertainty
Stewart, Ian
Professor Ian Stewart explores the development and limits of the mathematics that tame uncertainty. Uncertainty is everywhere. It lurks in every consideration of the future – the weather, the economy, the sex of an unborn child – even quantities we think that we know such as populations or the transit of the planets contain the possibility of error. It’s no wonder that, throughout that history, we have attempted to produce rigidly defined areas of uncertainty – we prefer the surprise party to the surprise asteroid. We began our quest to make certain an uncertain world by reading omens in livers, tea leaves, and the stars. However, over the centuries, driven by curiosity, competition, and a desire be better gamblers, pioneering mathematicians and scientists began to reduce wild uncertainties to tame distributions of probability and statistical inferences. But, even as unknown unknowns became known unknowns, our pessimism made us believe that some problems were unsolvable and our intuition misled us. Worse, as we realised how omnipresent and varied uncertainty is, we encountered chaos, quantum mechanics, and the limitations of our predictive power. Professor Ian Stewart explores the history and mathematics of uncertainty. Touching on gambling, probability, statistics, financial and weather forecasts, censuses, medical studies, chaos, quantum physics, and climate, he makes one thing clear: a reasonable probability is the only certainty.
Science/Mathematics | TP | $32.99

Space Atlas (second edition)
Trefil, James
In this guided tour of our planetary neighbourhood, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and beyond, detailed maps and fascinating imagery from recent space missions partner with clear, authoritative scientific information. Starting with the sun and moving outward into space, acclaimed science writer and physicist James Trefil illuminates each planet, the most important moons, significant asteroids, and other objects in our solar system. Looking beyond, he explains what we know about the Milky Way and other galaxies – and how we know it, with clear explanations of the basics of astrophysics, including dark matter and gravitational waves. For this new edition, and to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his moonwalk, astronaut and American hero Buzz Aldrin offers a new special section on Earth’s moon and its essential role in space exploration, past and future.
Science | HC | $85.00

Artificial Intelligence: Modern Magic or Dangerous Future?
Wilks, Yorick
Artificial intelligence has long been a mainstay of science fiction and increasingly it feels as if AI is entering our everyday lives, with technology like Apple’s Siri now prominent, and self-driving cars almost upon us. But what do we actually mean when we talk about ‘AI’? Are the sentient machines of 2001 or The Matrix a real possibility or will real-world artificial intelligence look and feel very different? What has it done for us so far? And what technologies could it yield in the future? AI expert Yorick Wilks takes a journey through the history of artificial intelligence up to the present day, examining its origins, controversies and achievements, as well as looking into just how it works. He also considers the future, assessing whether these technologies could menace our way of life, but also how we are all likely to benefit from AI applications in the years to come. Entertaining, enlightening, and keenly argued, this is the essential one-stop guide to the AI debate.
Technology/Society and culture | PBK | $19.99

A Short History of Trains
Wolmar, Christian
From the earliest steam engine to the high-speed bullet trains of today, A Short History of Trains reveals the hidden stories of railway history across the world – the inspired engineering; the blood, sweat, and tears that went into the construction of the tracks; the ground-breaking innovations behind the trains that travelled along them; and the triumphs and tragedies of the people who made the railway what it is. Chart the history of the Trans-Siberian railway, the Orient Express, and Maglev trains and the impact of world events on the development of trains and the railway. Explore the pioneering railway lines that crossed continents, the key trains of each era, and the locomotives that changed the world. A riveting narrative packed with photographs, diagrams, and maps to illustrate and illuminate, this is the biography of the machines that carried us into the modern era.
Railway history | PBK | $19.99