Non-Fiction Catalogue: July 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in July 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

The German Soldier’s Pocket Manual: 1914–18 (general military)
Bull, Stephen
This is the first Pocket Manual to be dedicated to the German Army in the First World War, with chapters comprising of complete documents or extracts drawn from two major sources: the German Army of 1914–18 itself, or the intelligence sections of other armies. It describes the new tactics and units developed by the German army during the war, including the myths surrounding Stormtrooper units. These new methods used were a result of interaction between the opposing forces and incremental in their appearance. Nevertheless, the new ideas were hugely influential and important not only to the German army but to others as well, including British and American forces. Utilising a wide range of sources, including various pamphlets and manuals that were produced throughout World War I, this fascinating pocket manual gives a German perspective to World War I.
Military history | HC | $18.99

Instrument of War: The German Army 1914–18 (general military)
Showalter, Dennis
Drawing on more than a half-century of research and teaching, Dennis Showalter presents a fresh perspective on the German Army during World War I. Showalter surveys an army at the heart of a national identity, driven by – yet, also defeated by – warfare in the modern age, which struggled to capitalise on its victories and ultimately forgot the lessons of its defeat. Exploring the internal dynamics of the German Army and detailing how the soldiers coped with the many new forms of warfare, Showalter shows how the army’s institutions responded to, and how Germany itself was changed by war. Detailing the major campaigns on the Western and Eastern fronts and the forgotten war fought in the Middle East and Africa, this comprehensive volume, now available in paperback, examines the army’s operational strategy, the complexities of campaigns of movement versus static trench warfare, and the effects of changes in warfare.
Military history | PBK | $22.99

The Forgotten Dead: The true story of Exercise Tiger, the disastrous rehearsal for D-Day (general military)
Small, Ken & Rogerson, Mark
27 April 1944. Exercise Tiger. German E-boats intercept rehearsals for the D-Day landings… On a dark night in 1944, a beautiful stretch of the Devon coast became the scene of desperate horror. Tales began to leak out of night-time explosions and seaborne activity. This was practice for Exercise Tiger, the main rehearsal for the Utah Beach landings… This fiasco, in which nearly 1,000 soldiers died, was buried by officials until it was almost forgotten. That is, until Ken Small discovered the story, and decided to dedicate the rest of his life to honouring the brave young men who perished in the disastrous exercise. Pulling a Sherman tank from the seabed, Ken created a memorial to those who died and started to share their story, and his, with the world. This updated edition of a bestselling classic is a gripping tale of wartime disaster and rescue in the words of the soldiers who were there, and of one man’s curiosity that turned into a fight to ensure that they would never be forgotten.
Military history | PBK | $19.99

 

General non-fiction

Do Robots Make Love?: From AI to Immortality – Understanding Transhumanism in 12 Questions
Alexandre, Laurent & Besnier, Jean-Michel
Through 12 thought-provoking questions, a philosopher and a scientist explore the real-world ramifications of transhumanism – the tech movement that seeks to improve the human condition through science. Should we enhance the human condition with technology? Does anyone really want to live for a thousand years? Could AI end up destroying mankind? Discover the incredible potential of mankind’s near future as a Doctor and a Philosopher debate the big questions surrounding the incredible potential of transhumanism. This movement – that seeks to improve the human condition, through science – has fast become one of the most controversial the scientific community have ever faced. As scientists in California make great strides in using advanced technology to enhance human intellect and physiology, the ethical and moral questions surrounding its possibilities have never been more pressing. Should we change the way we reproduce? Could we enhance the human body with technology to the point where we are all technically cyborgs? Is it possible to make love to a robot? Doctor and entrepreneur Laurent Alexandre and tech-philosopher Jean Michel Besnier go head to head on the big questions, in an entertaining and thought-provoking debate on the fundamental principles of transhumanism.
Transhumanism | HC | $24.99

The Secret World: A History of Intelligence
Andrew, Christopher
‘God sent out spies into the land of Canaan’. The first mention of espionage in world literature is in the Book of Exodus. From there, Christopher Andrew traces shift in the ancient world from divination to what we would recognise as attempts to gather real intelligence in the conduct of military operations, and considers how far ahead of the West – at that time – China and India were. He charts the development of intelligence and security operations and capacity through, amongst others, Renaissance Venice, Elizabethan England, Revolutionary America, Napoleonic France, right up to sophisticated modern activities of which he is the world’s best-informed interpreter. What difference have security and intelligence operations made to course of history? This fascinating book provides the answers.
Espionage/Military intelligence | HC | $69.99

Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, 1921–33
Applebaum, Anne
In 1932–33, nearly four million Ukrainians died of starvation, having been deliberately deprived of food. Red Famine shows how this happened, who was responsible, and what the consequences were. The book draws on a mass of archival material and first-hand testimony. It includes accounts by survivors describing what human beings can do when driven mad by hunger. It shows how the Soviet state used propaganda to turn neighbours against each other, in order to expunge supposedly ‘anti-revolutionary’ elements. It also records the actions of extraordinary individuals who did all they could to relieve the suffering. The famine was rapidly followed by an attack on Ukraine’s cultural and political leadership – and then by a denial that it had ever happened. The Soviet authorities were determined not only that Ukraine should abandon its national aspirations, but that the country’s true history should be buried along with its millions of victims. Red Famine, a triumph of scholarship and human sympathy, is a milestone in the recovery of those memories and that history.
History | PBK | $24.99

Democracy and Its Crisis
Grayling, A C
Prompted by events in recent years in the UK and the USA, in Latin America, Russia and the Middle East, A C Grayling investigates why the institutions of representative democracy seem unable to sustain themselves against forces they were designed to manage, and why it matters. In each of five short chapters, he considers a moment in history in which the challenges we face today were first encountered, how they were overcome – or not – and with what consequences. With the advent of authoritarian leaders and the simultaneous rise of populism, representative democracy appears to be caught between a rock and a hard place, yet it is this space that it must occupy, argues Grayling, if a civilised society, that looks after all its people, is to flourish.
Society/Politics | PBK | $19.99

Elemental: How the Periodic Table Can Now Explain (Nearly) Everything
James, Tim
If you want to understand how our world works, the periodic table holds the answers. This book shows you how to use it to understand all the ingredients necessary to make a world. The Universe came into being 13.8 billion years ago. At this point, all of existence could be summed up as an endless soup of particles frothing at temperatures many times hotter than the Sun. It was chaos. Fortunately, as the Universe expanded, everything began to cool, and the particles stabilised. It was around this time, as disorder gave way to order, that the elements were born. Fast forward to June 2016 and the periodic table of elements was finally completed with the discovery and addition of four new elements. At last, we could identify all the ingredients necessary to make a world. But it doesn’t stop there. Human ingenuity knows no bounds; we have even begun to invent our own elements and have created an entire science devoted to their study: chemistry. When it comes to chemistry, Tim James knows his stuff. In Elemental, he tells the story of the periodic table from its ancient Greek roots, when you could count the number of elements humans were aware of on one hand, to the modern alchemists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, who have used nuclear chemistry and physics to generate new elements and complete the periodic table. In addition to this, James answers questions such as: What is the chemical symbol for a human? What would happen if all of the elements were mixed together? How many bananas can you stand next to, before you die of radiation sickness? Which liquid can teleport through walls? Why is the medieval dream of transmuting lead into gold now a reality?
Science – Chemistry | TP | $32.99

Carpathia: The extraordinary story of the ship that rescued the survivors of the Titanic
Ludowyke, Jay
The dramatic and fascinating story of RMS Carpathia: rescue ship to RMS Titanic; sunk by a German U-boat in WWI; and lost in ocean depths, until located by an intrepid dive team nearly 100 years later. In the early hours of 15 April 1912, the Cunard steamship Carpathia receives a distress call from the new White Star liner Titanic. Captain Arthur Rostron immediately turns Carpathia northwest and sails full speed through the dark night, into waters laden with icebergs, on a rescue mission that will become legendary. Almost a century later, Carpathia’s wreck has finally been located. She’s over 500 feet down and only a few divers in the world can attain these depths. Among them is Englishman Ric Waring’s team. In this captivating and intensively researched story, we follow the dual narratives of Rostron and the daring rescue of the Titanic survivors by Carpathia, and of Waring’s team and their dangerous determination to reach the wreck. Rich in history and drama, the true story of Carpathia – from her launching to the sensational events of 1912, World War I and beyond is a compelling narrative that moves at the page-turning pace of the very best fiction.
Martime history | TP | $32.99

Seeds of Science: Why We Got It So Wrong On GMOs
Lynas, Mark
Mark Lynas was one of the original GM field wreckers. Back in the 1990s – working undercover with his colleagues in the environmental movement – he would descend on trial sites of genetically modified crops at night and hack them to pieces. Two decades later, most people around the world – from New York to China – still think that ‘GMO’ foods are bad for their health or likely to damage the environment. But Mark has changed his mind. This book explains why. In 2013, in a world-famous recantation speech, Mark apologised for having destroyed GM crops. He spent the subsequent years touring Africa and Asia, and working with plant scientists who are using this technology to help smallholder farmers in developing countries cope better with pests, diseases and droughts. This book lifts the lid on the anti-GMO craze and shows how science was left by the wayside as a wave of public hysteria swept the world. Mark takes us back to the origins of the technology and introduces the scientific pioneers who invented it. He explains what led him to question his earlier assumptions about GM food, and talks to both sides of this fractious debate to see what still motivates worldwide opposition today. In the process he asks – and answers – the killer question: how did we all get it so wrong on GMOs?
Science, genetic engineering | TP | $29.99

Amazons: The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World
Man, John
Since the time of the ancient Greeks we have been fascinated by accounts of the Amazons, an elusive tribe of hard-fighting, horse-riding female warriors. Equal to men in battle, legends claimed they cut off their right breasts to improve their archery skills and routinely killed their male children to purify their ranks. For centuries, people believed in their existence and attempted to trace their origins. Artists and poets celebrated their battles and wrote of Amazonia. Spanish explorers, carrying these tales to South America, thought they lived in the forests of the world’s greatest river, and named it after them. In the absence of evidence, we eventually reasoned away their existence, concluding that these powerful, sexually liberated female soldiers must have been the fantastical invention of Greek myth and storytelling. Until now. Following decades of new research and a series of ground-breaking archaeological discoveries, we now know these powerful warrior queens did indeed exist. In Amazons, John Man travels to the grasslands of Central Asia, from the edge of the ancient Greek world to the borderlands of China, to discover the truth about the warrior women mythologised as Amazons. In this deeply researched, sweeping historical epic, Man redefines our understanding of the Amazons and their culture, tracking the ancient legend into the modern world and examining its significance today.
Ancient history | PBK | $24.99

October: The Story of the Russian Revolution
Miéville, China
In February of 1917, Russia was a backward, autocratic monarchy, mired in an unpopular war; by October, after not one but two revolutions, it had become the world’s first workers’ state, straining to be at the vanguard of global revolution. How did this unimaginable transformation take place? In a panoramic sweep, stretching from St Petersburg and Moscow to the remotest villages of a sprawling empire, Miéville uncovers the catastrophes, intrigues and inspirations of 1917, in all their passion, drama and strangeness. Intervening in long-standing historical debates, but told with the reader new to the topic especially in mind, here is a breathtaking story of humanity at its greatest and most desperate; of a turning point for civilisation that still resonates loudly, today. China Miéville tells the extraordinary story of this pivotal moment in history
Russian Revolution | PBK | $19.99

Out of the Wreckage: A New Politics for an Age of Crisis
Monbiot, George
Today, our lives are dominated by an ideology of extreme competition and individualism. It misrepresents human nature, destroying hope and common purpose. But we cannot replace it without a positive vision, one that reengages people in politics and lights a path to a better world. Urgent and passionate, George Monbiot shows how new findings in psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology cast humans in a radically different light: as the supreme altruists and cooperators. He shows how both democracy and economic life can be radically reorganised from the bottom up, enabling us to take back control and overthrow the forces that have thwarted our ambitions for a better society. Out of the Wreckage explains just how communities can be rebuilt with the help of a new ‘politics of belonging’.
Society and culture/politics | PBK | $19.99

The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin’s Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World – and Us
Prum, Richard O
In the great halls of science, dogma holds that Darwin’s theory of natural selection explains every branch on the tree of life: which species thrive, which wither away to extinction, and what features each evolves. But can adaptation by natural selection really account for everything we see in nature? Yale University ornithologist Richard Prum – reviving Darwin’s own views – thinks not. Deep in tropical jungles around the world are birds with a dizzying array of appearances and mating displays: Club-winged Manakins who sing with their wings, Great Argus Pheasants who dazzle prospective mates with a four-foot-wide cone of feathers covered in golden 3D spheres, Red-capped Manakins who moonwalk. In thirty years of fieldwork, Prum has seen numerous display traits that seem disconnected from, if not outright contrary to, selection for individual survival. To explain this, he dusts off Darwin’s long-neglected theory of sexual selection in which the act of choosing a mate for purely aesthetic reasons – for the mere pleasure of it – is an independent engine of evolutionary change. Mate choice can drive ornamental traits from the constraints of adaptive evolution, allowing them to grow ever more elaborate. It also sets the stakes for sexual conflict, in which the sexual autonomy of the female evolves in response to male sexual control. Most crucially, this framework provides important insights into the evolution of human sexuality, particularly the ways in which female preferences have changed male bodies, and even maleness itself, through evolutionary time. The Evolution of Beauty presents a unique scientific vision for how nature’s splendour contributes to a more complete understanding of evolution and of ourselves.
Evolution | TP | $29.99

Tamed: Ten Species that Changed our World
Roberts, Alice
For hundreds of thousands of years, our ancestors depended on wild plants and animals to stay alive – until they began to tame them. Combining archaeology and cutting-edge genetics, Tamed tells the story of the greatest revolution in human history and reveals the fascinating origins of ten crucial domesticated species; and how they, in turn, transformed us. In a world creaking under the strain of human activity, Alice Roberts urges us to look again at our relationship with the natural world – and our huge influence upon it.
Popular science | PBK | $24.99

The Science Delusion: Feeling the Spirit of Enquiry
Sheldrake, Rupert
The scientific counter-argument to Richard Dawkins’ The God Delusion. Feeling the Spirit of Enquiry? The science delusion is the belief that science already understands the nature of reality. The fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in. In this book, Dr Rupert Sheldrake, one of the world’s most innovative scientists, shows that science is being constricted, by assumptions that have hardened into dogmas. The ‘scientific worldview’ has become a belief system. All reality is material or physical. The world is a machine, made up of dead matter. Nature is purposeless. Consciousness is nothing but the physical activity of the brain. Free will is an illusion. God exists only as an idea in human minds, imprisoned within our skulls. Sheldrake examines these dogmas scientifically, and shows persuasively that science would be better off without them: freer, more interesting, and more fun. In The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins used science to bash God, but here Rupert Sheldrake shows that Dawkins’ understanding of what science can do is old-fashioned and itself a delusion. A reissue.
Science/philosophy/religion | PBK | $22.99

Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
Tegmark, Max
We stand at the beginning of a new era. What was once science fiction is fast becoming reality, as AI transforms war, crime, justice, jobs and society-and, even, our very sense of what it means, to be human. More than any other technology, AI has the potential to revolutionise our collective future – and there’s nobody better situated to explore that future than Max Tegmark, an MIT professor and co-founder of the Future of Life Institute, whose work has helped mainstream research on how to keep AI beneficial. In this deeply researched and vitally important new book, Tegmark takes us to the heart of thinking about AI and the human condition, bringing us face to face with the essential questions of our time. What sort of future do we want? Life 3.0 gives us the tools to join what may be the most important conversation of our time.
Society and culture/artificial intelligence | PBK | $22.99

The Cold War: A World History
Westad, Odd Arne
As Germany and then Japan surrendered in 1945, there was a tremendous hope that a new and much better world could be created from the moral and physical ruins of the conflict. Instead, the combination of the huge power of the USA and USSR and the near-total collapse of most of their rivals created a unique, grim new environment: the Cold War. For over forty years, the demands of the Cold War shaped the life of almost all of us. Europe was seemingly split in two indefinitely. This is a book of extraordinary scope and daring. It is conventional to see the first half of the 20th century as a nightmare and the second half as a reprieve. Westad shows that for much of the world the second half was, by most measures, even worse.
History | PBK | $24.99

Hello, Shadowlands: Inside Southeast Asia’s Organised Crime
Winn, Patrick
The story of Southeast Asia’s anarchic enclaves and their hidden connections to the West. There is no better place to observe the clash between old codes and the pressures of the 21st century than on the darker parts of the map, beyond the tourist trail, where armed clans rule. Spanning Thailand’s insurgency zone to the swamplands of Vietnam, investigative journalist Patrick Winn spent two years travelling amongst the lives of those bound by hard truths. These are places where, in the absence of law, ordinary people must summon brilliant ingenuity to survive. The book penetrates the worlds of Islamic crust punks, dog thief syndicates, North Korean restaurateurs and others chasing fortunes in the shadows. These characters aren’t just tormented by local tyrants. Their lives are also complicated by greater forces – especially Western conglomerates or old US foreign policy misdeeds, still reverberating through the region. Life in the shadowlands isn’t always ponderous: from the guerrilla fiefdoms of Myanmar to punk-rock squat houses in Aceh, humour can still flourish, and Hello, Shadowlands is the most accessible guide yet to these bleakly dangerous places.
Organised crime | TP | $29.99