Non-Fiction Catalogue: January 2020

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in January 2020.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. View our current postage rates, within Australia.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

The Panzer Division (The History of the Panzerwaffe, volume 3)
Anderson, Thomas
The first two volumes of the History of the Panzerwaffe have described how the Germans transformed armoured warfare from a lumbering and ponderous experiment in World War I into something that could decide the outcome of conflicts, and how the legendary Panzerwaffe overran Western Europe and reached the gates of Moscow to the east, before taking its place in the forefront of German defence from the D-Day landings to the valiant last stand in Berlin. This third volume focuses on the most important units in the Panzerwaffe, and some of the most famous units in the history of warfare: the Panzer Divisions. It details their pre-war origins and how they developed over the course of the war, covering all the specialised units and how they operated on the battlefield. The title is illustrated throughout with many rare and previously unpublished images and the text draws heavily on original German documents.
Military history | HC | $59.99

D-Day: Storming Fortress Europe (Under Fire 1)
Chambers, Jack; Hendrix, Erik & Polls, Esteve (illustrator)
The sixth of June, 1944: a vast armada stands off the coast of Normandy; in the pre-dawn gloom gliders carrying British airborne troops approach their target. The first shots are about to be fired in ‘the Great Crusade’ to free Europe from Nazi occupation and thousands of troops will fight their way ashore in the teeth of deadly machine-gun and artillery fire from the German defenders. D-Day is about to begin. The Normandy landings are brought alive in this electrifying graphic novel that tells the story of that Longest Day through the eyes of the men who were there. Discover an epic struggle, as the Allies sought to overwhelm the German defenders by land, sea and air; who, in turn, battled desperately to drive the invasion back into the sea. Covering the full range of events from the earliest airborne assault through the struggle on the beaches and the desperate effort to establish a bridgehead inland, D-Day blends an authentic historical narrative with master illustration to reveal the full story of the day that changed the course of World War II.
Military history | PBK | $39.99

The Wright Flyers 1899–1916:
the kites, gliders, and aircraft that launched the ‘Air Age’
(X-Planes 13)

Hallion, Richard P & Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
Orville and Wilbur Wright, two bicycle-making brothers from Dayton, Ohio, secured their place as the most famous names in aviation history when, on 17 December 1903, they made the first powered, controlled, and sustained heavier-than-air flight. But their success over the cold and windswept Carolina dunes that day has overshadowed their many other accomplishments before and after that historic flight. The Wrights’ progression from theory to analysis to ground-testing components and wing shapes, and then to flight-testing kites, gliders, and their first powered aeroplane, marked the world’s first successful ‘X-Plane’ research and development programme. They established a template all subsequent aircraft have followed, one still relevant in the era of hypersonic flight and drone research. This book traces the Wright Brothers’ story, from their first success on that cold December day throughout their glory years to their eventual eclipse by other aviators. It explores in detail the process that lead them to their pioneering craft and their many subsequent achievements over the following years, and highlights their enduring importance in the age of modern flight.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Desperate Sunset: Japan’s kamikazes against Allied ships, 1944–45 (general aviation)
Yeo, Mike
Fully-illustrated throughout, Desperate Sunset examines the development and evolution of the kamikaze using first-hand accounts, combat reports, and archived histories. By the middle of 1944, Imperial Japan’s armed forces were in an increasingly desperate situation. Its elite air corps had been wiped out over the Solomons in 1942–43, and its navy was a shadow of the force that had attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. But the Japanese had one last, desperate, card to play. The Japanese High Command decided that the way to inflict maximum damage on the superior enemy forces was to get the poorly trained Japanese pilots to crash their explosive-laden aircraft onto their target, essentially turning themselves into a guided missile. The kamikazes announced themselves in the immediate aftermath of the Leyte Gulf naval battles, sinking the USS St Louis and damaging several other ships. The zenith of the kamikaze came in the battle of Okinawa, which included ten kikusui (Floating Chrysanthemum) operations which involved up to several hundred aircraft attacking the US fleet.
Aviation history | HC | $69.99

 

General non-fiction

When the Dogs Don’t Bark: a Forensic Scientist’s Search for the Truth
Gallop, Angela
Kathy Reichs meets Fragile Lives, in this fascinating and compelling memoir by one of the world’s leading forensic scientists, Professor Angela Gallop. The compelling memoir from the UK’s most eminent forensic scientist and some of the most fascinating criminal investigations she has worked on. ‘Finding the right answers is what forensic science is all about. What often matters even more, however, is asking the right questions.’ Never before has criminal justice rested so heavily on scientific evidence. With ever-more sophisticated and powerful techniques at their disposal, forensic scientists have an unprecedented ability to help solve even the most complex cases. Angela Gallop has been a forensic scientist for over 40 years. After joining the Forensic Science Service, the first crime scene she attended was for a case involving the Yorkshire Ripper. As well as working on a wide range of cases in many countries around the world, she is now the most sought-after forensic scientist in the UK, where she has helped solve numerous high-profile cases, including the investigation that finally absolved the Cardiff Three, the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path murders, and the killings of Stephen Lawrence, Damilola Taylor, Rachel Nickell, and Roberto Calvi. From the crime scene to the courtroom, When the Dogs Don’t Bark is the remarkable story of a life spent searching for the truth.
Memoir/Forensic science | TP | $29.99

Long Live Latin: the Pleasures of a Useless Language
Gardini, Nicola
The international bestseller that celebrates the beauty, passion, and life lessons to be found in this not-so-dead language. Virgil gave us the Aeneid, and Ovid the Metamorphoses; Lucretius analysed the material world, and Caesar interrogated how we view reality through the lens of reason – but what does Latin offer us, today? Often seen as the bulky relic of school curricula, long forgotten, Latin seems to have lost its punch in the popular conscious. Oxford academic Nicola Gardini, however, argues the case for its lasting importance, offering a personal and passionate defence of the beauty and future of the language. From these ancient writers, we can learn about such vital aspects of life as love, purpose, eloquence, beauty, and loss. These lessons from the past can illuminate our present, and Gardini encourages us to dig to the roots of our own language – to consider how Latin has influenced the ways in which we communicate, think, and live today. A formidable mix of history, memoir and criticism, this is a beautiful love letter to one language that ultimately celebrates the vital power of all literature.
Language | HC | $32.99

The Aeronauts: Travels in the Air
Glaisher, James
The true story behind the major motion picture – and one of the greatest daredevil stories in the history of aviation… In 1862, ambitious scientist James Glaisher set out to do the impossible: ascend higher into the skies, than ever before, to establish his ground-breaking research. Written in his own words, The Aeronauts chronicles Glaisher’s incredible flights and discoveries, first hand; as well as his observations on the pioneers who came before and inspired him. His death-defying journey forms the story of the forthcoming major motion picture The Aeronauts, starring Eddie Redmayne as Glaisher and Felicity Jones as his balloon companion, Amelia Wren.
Memoir | PBK | $24.99

How Things Work: the Inner Life of Everyday Machines
Gray, Theodore
Theodore Gray has become a household name among fans, both young and old, of popular science and mechanics. He’s an incorrigible tinkerer with a constant curiosity for how things work. Gray’s readers love how he always brings the perfect combination of know-how, humour, and derring-do to every project or demonstration, be it scientific or mechanical. In How Things Work he explores the mechanical underpinnings of dozens of types of machines and mechanisms, from the cotton gin to the wristwatch to an industrial loom. Filled with stunning original photographs in Gray’s inimitable style, How Things Work is a must-have exploration of stuff – large and small – for any builder, maker or lover of mechanical things.
Science | HC | $42.99

The Elements: a Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe
Gray, Theodore
An eye-opening, original collection of gorgeous, never-before-seen photographic representations of the 118 elements in the periodic table. The elements are what we, and everything around us, are made of. But how many elements has anyone actually seen in pure, uncombined form? The Elements provides this rare opportunity. Based on seven years of research and photography, the pictures in this book make up the most complete, and visually arresting, representation available to the naked eye of every atom in the universe. Organised in order of appearance on the periodic table, each element is represented by a spread that includes a stunning, full-page, full-colour photograph that most closely represents it in its purest form. For example, at -183° C, oxygen turns from a colourless gas to a beautiful pale blue liquid. Also included are fascinating facts, figures, and stories of the elements as well as data on the properties of each, including atomic weight, density, melting and boiling point, valence, electronegativity, and the year and location in which it was discovered. Several additional photographs show each element in slightly altered forms or as used in various practical ways. The element’s position on the periodic table is pinpointed on a mini rendering of the table and an illustrated scale of the element’s boiling and/or melting points appears on each page along with a density scale that runs along the bottom. Packed with interesting information, this combination of solid science and stunning artistic photographs is the perfect gift book for every sentient creature in the universe. Includes a tear-out poster of Theodore Gray’s iconic Photographic Periodic Table!
Science | TP | $29.99

Molecules
Gray, Theodore
Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In Molecules, Theodore Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his bestselling book, The Elements. Here, he explores through fascinating stories and trademark stunning photography the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world. Gray begins with an explanation of how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, as well as the difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. He then goes on to explore the vast array of materials molecules can create, including: soaps and solvents; goops and oils; rocks and ores; ropes and fibres; painkillers and dangerous drugs; sweeteners; perfumes and stink bombs; colours and pigments; and controversial compounds including asbestos, CFCs, and thimerosal. Big, gorgeous photographs, as well as diagrams of the compounds and their chemical bonds, rendered with never before seen beauty, fill the pages and capture molecules in their various states. As he did in The Elements, Gray shows us molecules as we’ve never seen them before. It’s the perfect book for his loyal fans who’ve been eager for more and for anyone fascinated with the mysteries of the material world.
Science | TP | $29.99

Reaction
Gray, Theodore
With Reactions, Theodore Gray continues the journey through our molecular and chemical world that began with the tour de force, The Elements, and continued with Molecules. In The Elements, Gray gave us a never-before-seen, mesmerising photographic view of the 118 elements in the periodic table. In Molecules, with the same phenomenal photographic acumen, plus beautifully rendered computer generated graphics, he showed us how the elements combine to form the content that makes up our universe, from table salt to oxygen to the panoply of colours and smells that surround us. At last, we’ve reached Reactions, in which Gray, once again, puts his photography and storytelling to work demonstrating how molecules interact in ways that are essential to our very existence. The book begins with a brief recap of elements and molecules and then goes on to explain important concepts that characterise a chemical reaction; including Energy, Entropy, and Time. It is then organised by type of reaction including Combustion, Photosynthesis, Respiration, Oxidation, and Fermentation. A special section dedicated to chemical cycles includes the Carbon Cycle, the Iron Cycle, and the Lime Cycle.
Science | HC | $42.99

Unlocking the Universe
Hawking, Stephen
From the brilliant Lucy Hawking and her father, the world’s most beloved scientist, Professor Stephen Hawking, comes the ultimate children’s guide to the universe. Have you ever wondered how the universe began? Or what it takes to put humans on the moon – or even on Mars? What would you do, if you could travel through space and time? Embark on the adventure of a lifetime in this beautiful collection of up-to-the-minute essays by the world’s leading scientists including Professor Stephen Hawking, himself, plus mind-blowing facts and out-of-this-world colour photographs.
Science for children | TP | $26.99

Midnight in Chernobyl: the Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster
Higginbotham, Adam
The dramatic, untold story of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, based on original reporting and new archival research. Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers not only its own citizens, but all of humanity. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful non-fiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth. Midnight in Chernobyl is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will – lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats – remain not just vital, but necessary.
History/Science | TP | $35.00

Falling Upwards: Inspiration for the Aeronauts
Holmes, Richard
From ambitious scientists rising above the clouds to analyse the air, to war generals floating across enemy lines, Richard Holmes takes to the air in this heart-lifting history of pioneer balloonists. Falling Upwards asks why they risked their lives, and how their flights revealed the secrets of our planet. The stories range from early ballooning rivals to the long-distance voyages of American entrepreneurs; from the legendary balloon escape from the Prussian siege of Paris to dauntless James Glaisher… who, in the 1860s, flew seven miles above the earth – without oxygen. Falling Upwards has inspired the major motion picture The Aeronauts. In a glorious fusion of history, art, science, and biography, this is a book about what balloons give rise to: the spirit of discovery, and the brilliant humanity of recklessness, vision, and hope.
Aeronautic history | PBK | $19.99

How to Write Short Stories and Get Them Published
Lister, Ashley
The definitive, indispensable guide to writing quality short stories and getting them published. This book will help you plot like a pro, master the art of suspense like Poe, craft captivating dialogue like Twain, and – most crucially – get your short stories published. How to Write Short Stories and Get Them Published is the essential guide to writing short fiction. It takes the aspiring writer from their initial idea through to potential outlets for publication and pitching proposals to publishers. Along the journey, this guide considers the most important aspects of creative writing, such as character, plot, point of view, description, and dialogue. All of these areas are illustrated with examples of classic fiction, and accompanied by exercises that will help every writer hone their natural skill and talent into the ability to craft compelling short stories.
Creative writing | PBK | $22.99

The Hitler Years: Triumph 1933–39
McDonough, Frank
A new narrative of the rise and catastrophic fall of the Nazi regime: a twelve-year descent into barbarism, genocide and aggressive war that cost over 50 million lives. On 30 January 1933, Adolf Hitler was appointed the German Chancellor of a coalition government by President Hindenburg. Within a few months he had installed a dictatorship, jailing and killing his left-wing opponents, terrorising the rest of the population, and driving Jews out of public life. He embarked on a crash programme on militaristic Keynesianism, reviving the economy and achieving full employment through massive public works, vast armaments spending and the cancellations of foreign debts. After the grim years of the Great Depression, Germany seemed to have been reborn as a brutal and determined European power. Over the course of the years from 1933 to 1939, Hitler won over most of the population to his vision of a renewed Reich. In these years of domestic triumph, cunning manoeuvres, pitting neighbouring powers against each other and biding his time, we see Hitler preparing for the moment that would realise his ambition. But what drove Hitler’s success was also to be the fatal flaw of his regime: a relentless belief in war as the motor of greatness, a dream of vast conquests in Eastern Europe, and an astonishingly fanatical racism. In The Hitler Years, Frank McDonough charts the rise and fall of the Third Reich under Hitler’s hand. The first volume, Triumph, ends after Germany’s comprehensive military defeat of Poland, in 1939.
History | HC | $49.99

You are Not So Smart: Why Your Memory is Mostly Fiction, Why You Have Too Many Friends
on Facebook, and 46 Other Ways You’re Deluding Yourself

McRaney, David
Think you’re rational? Think, again… How many of your Facebook friends do you think you know? Would you help a stranger in need? Do you know why you’re so in love with your new smartphone? The truth is: you’re probably wrong. You are not so smart. In this international bestseller, award-winning journalist David McRaney examines the assorted ways we mislead ourselves, every single day. A psychology course with all the boring bits taken out, prepare for a whirlwind tour of the latest research in the subject, fused with a healthy dose of humour and wit. You’ll discover just how irrational you really are, which delusions keep you sane, how to boost your productivity, and why you’ve never kept a New Year’s resolution.
Psychology | PBK | $22.99

Airline Maps: a Century of Art and Design
Ovenden, Mark & Roberts, Maxwell
A nostalgic and celebratory look back at one hundred years of passenger flight, featuring full-colour reproductions of route maps and posters from the world’s most iconic airlines. In this gorgeously illustrated collection of airline route maps, Mark Ovenden and Maxwell Roberts look to the skies and transport readers to another time. Hundreds of images span a century of passenger flight, from the rudimentary trajectory of routes to the most intricately detailed birds-eye views of the land to be flown over. Advertisements for the first scheduled commercial passenger flights featured only a few destinations, with stunning views of the countryside and graphics of biplanes. As aviation took off, speed and mileage were trumpeted on bold posters featuring busy routes. Major airlines produced highly-stylised illustrations of their global presence, establishing now-classic brands. With trendy and forward-looking designs, cartographers celebrated the coming together of different cultures and made the earth look ever smaller. Eventually, fleets got bigger and routes multiplied, and graphic designers have found creative new ways to display huge amounts of information. Airline hubs bring their own cultural mark and advertise their plentiful destination options. Innovative maps depict our busy world with webs of overlapping routes and networks of low-cost, city-to-city hopping. But though flying has become more commonplace, Ovenden and Roberts remind us that early air travel was a glamorous affair for good reason. Airline Maps is a celebration of graphic design, cartographic skills and clever marketing, and a visual feast that reminds us to enjoy the journey as much as the destination.
Commercial aviation history | PBK | $35.00

Gene Machine: the Race to Decipher the Secrets of the Ribosome
Ramakrishnan, Venki
The thrilling story of how scientists unlocked a new window onto how life works… Everyone knows about DNA, the essence of our being, the molecule where our genes reside. But DNA by itself is useless without a machine to decode the genetic information it contains. The ribosome is that machine. Nobel Prize-winner Venki Ramakrishnan tells the story of the race to uncover its enormously complex structure, a fundamental breakthrough that resolves an ancient mystery of life itself.
Science | PBK | $22.99

How the Brain Lost Its Mind: Sex, Hysteria and the Riddle of Mental Illness
Ropper, Allan & Burrell, Brian David
The remarkable, intertwined histories of neurology, psychiatry, neurosyphilis, and hysteria, by the authors of Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole (PBK, $22.99). In 1882, Jean-Martin Charcot was the premiere physician in Paris, having just established a neurology clinic at the infamous Salpêtrière Hospital, a place that was called a ‘grand asylum of human misery’. Assessing the dismal conditions, he quickly set up to upgrade the facilities, and in doing so, revolutionised the treatment of mental illness. Many of Carcot’s patients had neurosyphilis (the advanced form of syphilis), a disease of mad poets, novelists, painters, and musicians, and a driving force behind the overflow of patients in Europe’s asylums. A sexually-transmitted disease, it is known as ‘the great imitator’ since its symptoms resemble those of almost any biological disease, or mental illness. It is also the perfect lens through which to peel back the layers to better understand the brain and the mind. Yet, Charcot’s work took a bizarre turn, when he brought mesmerism – hypnotism – into his clinic, abandoning his pursuit of the biological basis of illness in favour of the far sexier and theatrical treatment of female ‘hysterics’, whose symptoms mimic those seen in brain disease; but were elusive in origin. This and a general fear of contagion set the stage for Sigmund Freud, whose seductive theory, Freudian analysis, brought sex and hysteria onto the psychiatrist couch, leaving the brain behind. How the Brain Lost Its Mind tells this rich and compelling story, and raises a host of philosophical and practical questions. Are we any closer to understanding the difference between a sick mind and a sick brain? The real issue remains: where should neurology and psychiatry converge to explore not just the brain, but the nature of the human psyche?
Science/medicine | TP | $29.99

A World Without Work: Technology, Automation and How We Should Respond
Susskind, Daniel
A brilliant young economist explains how to meet the challenge of automation and rethink the future of work. From the spinning jenny to the combustion engine to the first computer, new technologies have always led workers to panic about being replaced by machines, and yet these fears have always been misplaced. In the past, new technology has always complemented the work of humans. In A World Without Work, award-winning economist Daniel Susskind shows why this time, with the rise of artificial intelligence, it will be different. The threat is real, but we haven’t been asking the right questions about exactly what is at stake. Drawing on almost a decade of research into this topic, Susskind argues that a realistic vision of the future is not one in which machines do everything, but rather in which they do more. As they slowly, but relentlessly, take on more and more tasks, human beings will be forced to retreat to the shrinking set of activities that machines cannot do. And, as we move through the 21st century, the demand for the work of humans is likely to wither away. Yet, Susskind reminds us that this technological progress will solve one of mankind’s oldest problems – how to make the economic pie large enough for everyone to live on. The challenge now is to properly share out this new economic prosperity, constrain the burgeoning political power of Big Tech, and provide meaning in a world with less work. A World Without Work is an innovative, authoritative and optimistic guide to how we can rise to the challenge of automation. The task ahead, Susskind shows us, is to build a world where everyone can flourish.
Economics/Society and culture | HC | $45.00

The Penguin Book Quiz: from the Very Hungry Caterpillar to Ulysses
Walton, James
A literary quiz for all the family from the writer and presenter of Radio 4’s books quiz. Which Haruki Murakami novel shares its title with a Beatles song? In Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, what is Charlie’s surname? What is heavy-drinking Rachel Watson known as, in the title of a 21st-century bestseller? And what do you get, if you add the number of Bennet sisters in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice to the number of Karamazov brothers in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov? With four hundred questions covering books from literary classics to modern bestsellers, through iconic children’s books, and books you say that you’ve read but really you haven’t, The Penguin Book Quiz is as appropriate for making you look well read at a party, as it is for a book-loving family to tuck into after Christmas dinner: it’s as enjoyable to read, as it is to play. Featuring the work of everyone from Antony Beevor to Zadie Smith, books from The Very Hungry Caterpillar to Ulysses, and with movie, music, television, theatre and literary references abound, this entertaining quiz tickles the fancy (and the brains) of light and heavy readers, alike. (Answers: Norwegian Wood; Bucket; The Girl on the Train; eight: five sisters; three brothers.)
Literary quiz | PBK | $22.99