Non-Fiction Catalogue: January 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in January 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

Case Red: The Collapse of France
Forczyk, Robert
Even after the legendary evacuation from Dunkirk in June 1940, there were still large British formations fighting the Germans alongside their French allies. After mounting a vigorous counterattack at Abbeville and then conducting a tough defence along the Somme, the British were forced to conduct a second evacuation from the ports of Le Havre, Cherbourg, Brest and St Nazaire. While France was in its death throes, politicians and soldiers debated what to do – flee to England or North Africa, or to seek an armistice. Case Red captures the drama of the final three weeks of military operations in France in June 1940, and explains the great impact it had on the course of relations between Britain and France during the remainder of the war. It also addresses the military, political and human drama of France’s collapse in June 1940, and how the windfall of captured military equipment, fuel and industrial resources enhanced the Third Reich’s ability to attack its next foe – the Soviet Union.
Military history/World War II | HC | $40.00

 

Non-fiction

Magnitude: The Scale of the Universe
Arcand, Kimberly; Watzke, Megan; Peek, Katie
An expansive journey to the limits of size, mass, distance, time, and temperature in our universe, from the tiniest particle within the structure of an atom to the most massive galaxy in the universe; from the speed at which grass grows (about two to six inches a month) to the speed of light. Fully-illustrated, with full-colour drawings and infographics throughout and organised into sections including Size and Amount (Distance, Area, Volume, Mass, Time, Temperature), Motion and Rate (Speed, Acceleration, Density, Rotation), and Phenomena and Processes (Energy, Pressure, Sound, Wind, Computation), Magnitude shows us the scale of our world in a clear, visual way that our relatively medium-sized human brains can easily understand.
Science | HC | $39.99

Radicals
Bartlett, Jamie
An exploration of the individuals, groups and movements who are rejecting the way we live now, and attempting to find alternatives. In it, Jamie Bartlett, one of the world’s leading thinkers on radical politics and technology, takes us inside the strange and exciting worlds of the innovators, disruptors, idealists and extremists who think society is broken, and believe they know how to fix it. From dawn raids into open mines to the darkest recesses of the internet, Radicals introduces us to some of the most secretive and influential movements today: techno-futurists questing for immortality, far-right groups seeking to close borders, militant environmentalists striving to save the planet’s natural reserves by any means possible, libertarian movements founding new countries, autonomous cooperatives in self-sustaining micro-societies, and psychedelic pioneers attempting to heal society with the help of powerful hallucinogens. As well as providing a fascinating glimpse at the people and ideas driving these groups, Radicals also presents a startling argument: radicals are not only the symptoms of a deep unrest within the world today, but might also offer the most plausible models for our future.
Culture/society/politics | PBK | $24.99

The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer
Blackburn, Elizabeth & Epel, Elissa
A ground-breaking book on the history of Telomeres, offering fresh advice on how to slow down aging and lengthen life. Nobel-prize-winning Dr Elizabeth Blackburn and leading health psychologist Dr Elissa Epel have discovered biological markers called Telomeres which can help to understand how healthy our cells are and what we can do to improve them. The book specifically looks ideas including; how biological age is not chronological age; a biological basis for the mind-body connection, how sleep and diet can affect telomeres and shockingly how mothers who are highly stressed during pregnancy have children with shorter telomeres. It also offers tools and advice on how to determine cellular age and telomere health.
Ageing | PBK | $22.99

On Time: Finding Your Pace in a World Addicted to Fast
Blyth, Catherine
Why has time sped up? Why is there never enough? How can you make it yours again? We have more time than ever – so why do we feel time poor? This is because our world is addicted to fast and we have become its servant. Instead of grasping the liberating potential of technology, many of us are stuck in a doomed race to outpace hurry. Catherine Blyth combines cutting-edge research in neuroscience and psychology with stories ranging from Leonardo da Vince to Anna Wintour, Kant, and Keith Richards, to reveal timeless truths about humanity’s finest invention and how it shapes our lives. Angry, witty and enlightening, On Time is a handbook for navigating a fast-forward world that asks the questions productivity guides ignore; such as why time speeds up when you long for it to slow down, how to reset your body clock, and what hours suit which activities best. So, stop clock-watching and quit chasing white rabbits. Rediscover how time can be your servant.
Personal development | PBK | $24.99

I, Mammal: The Story of What Makes Us Mammals
Drew, Liam
Humans are mammals. Most of us appreciate that at some level. But what does it mean for us to have more in common with a horse and an elephant than we do with a parrot, snake or frog? After a misdirected football left new father Liam Drew clutching a uniquely mammalian part of his anatomy, he decided to find out more. Considering himself as a mammal first and a human second, Liam delves into ancient biological history to understand what it means to be mammalian. In his humorous and engaging style, Liam explores the different characteristics that distinguish mammals from other types of animals. He charts the evolution of milk, warm blood and burgeoning brains, and examines the emergence of sophisticated teeth, exquisite ears, and elaborate reproductive biology, plus a host of other mammalian innovations. Entwined are tales of zoological peculiarities and reflections on how being a mammal has shaped the author’s life.
Biology/zoology | TP | $24.99

Spitfire Singh: A True Life of Relentless Adventure
Edwards, Mike
Their willingness to pay any price to uphold the honour and integrity of their Air Force meant an uphill battle against bigotry, difficult conditions of work and outdated equipment. However, showing tremendous fortitude, Harjinder and his men took the fight to the enemy and rose splendidly to the occasion. Be it the formidable Japanese, the mighty Germans or the resolute tribal warriors none could break the spirit of these airborne Indians. It is a story of relentless adventure, journeying from the scrublands of the North-Western Frontier, to the jungles of Burma, to the UK on the eve of D-Day and to the corridors of power in an independent India. The resourcefulness of the Indians and their sheer skill and determination meant that they could overcome the myriad of challenges thrown at them, much to the surprise and dismay of some officers of the Raj. It is a story of mutual respect forged and strengthened across lines of religion, caste, creed and race, as the Indian’s undeniable courage and resilience won even the hearts and minds of their British counterparts and one man was the centre of it all. Harjinder’s is a life of intense friendship, of great ingenuity and of hard work and dedication, interspersed with the humour and merriment that is ever present in the military environment. It was a bottom to top career for the lowly Hawai Sepoy, who went on to become one of the top officers of the IAF. He is credited with the endeavour to make the Indian Air force self-reliant and designed, built and test flew two different aircraft to prove his point. He was one of the driving forces behind making the Indian Air Force the fourth largest in the world, an astonishing feat given the twin challenges of nation building and partition. Thus, the only ‘disgrace’ to emerge from this book is how Harjinder’s story could remain untold, for so long.
Aviation history/biography | TP | $24.99

The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilised World
Goodell, Jeff
What if Atlantis wasn’t a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth’s thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster. By century’s end, hundreds of millions of people will be retreating from the world’s shores as our coasts become inundated and our landscapes transformed. From island nations to the world’s major cities, coastal regions will disappear. Engineering projects to hold back the water are bold and may buy some time. Yet despite international efforts and tireless research, there is no permanent solution – no barriers to erect or walls to build – that will protect us in the end from the drowning of the world as we know it. The Water Will Come is the definitive account of the coming water, why and how this will happen, and what it will all mean. As he travels across twelve countries and reports from the front lines, acclaimed journalist Jeff Goodell employs fact, science, and first-person, on-the-ground journalism to show vivid scenes from what already is becoming a water world.
Climate change | HC | $39.99

SuperHubs: How the Financial Elite and Their Networks Rule our World
Navidi, Sandra
A rare, behind-the-scenes look at the global financial system and the powerful personal networks through which it is run, at the centre of which sit the Elites – the SuperHubs. Combining an insider’s knowledge with principles of network science, Sandra Navidi offers a startling new perspective on how the financial system really operates. SuperHubs reveals what happens at the exclusive, invitation-only platforms – the World Economic Forum in Davos, the meetings of the International Monetary Fund, think-tank gatherings, power lunches, charity events, and private parties. This is the most vivid portrait to date of the global elite: the bank CEOs, fund managers, billionaire financiers and politicians who, through their interlocking relationships and collective influence are transforming the future of our financial system and, for better or worse, shaping our world.
Economics/politics | PBK | $22.99

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
Pink, Daniel H
Everyone knows that timing is everything. But we don’t know much about timing itself. Our lives are a never-ending stream of ‘when’ decisions: when to start a business, schedule a class, get serious about a person. Yet we make those decisions based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, it’s often assumed, is an art. In When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Pink shows that timing is really a science. Drawing on a rich trove of research from psychology, biology, and economics, Pink reveals how best to live, work, and succeed. How can we use the hidden patterns of the day to build the ideal schedule? Why do certain breaks dramatically improve student test scores? How can we turn a stumbling beginning into a fresh start? Why should we avoid going to the hospital in the afternoon? Why is singing in time with other people as good for you as exercise? And what is the ideal time to quite a job, switch careers or get married?
Science | TP | $32.99

100 Things They Don’t Want You to Know: Conspiracies, mysteries and unsolved crimes
Smith, Daniel
The truth is out there… Who was Jack the Ripper? Where did the Nazis stash their gold? Who are the real Men in Black? Did the Lost Cosmonauts exist? Why was Stonehenge built? 100 Things They Don’t Want You to Know sets out to uncover the truth behind the world’s most mysterious cover ups and unexplained events that have been shrouded in secrecy for generations. From suspicious deaths and disappearances to enigmatic identities, from Cold War cover ups to puzzling paranormal phenomena and UFOs, from ancient artefacts to coded documents, these mysteries have fired our imaginations for years, leading us on a quest for answers to these inexplicable yet fascinating events. Also includes: Black Dahlia, the Marfa Lights, the Turin Shroud, Spontaneous Combustion, Lost Literature of the Mayan Civilisation, Disappearance of Jean Spangler, Shakespeare’s True Identity, the Easter Island Glyphs, the Death of Lee Harvey Oswald, the Mothman, The Flying Dutchman, the Secret Mission of Rudolph Hess, the ‘WOW’ signal, Lewis Carroll’s Lost Diaries, the Man in the Iron Mask, and the Beast of Bodmin Moor.
Conspiracy/history | PBK | $19.99

A Most Elegant Equation: Euler’s Formula and the Beauty of Mathematics
Stipp, David
Bertrand Russell wrote that mathematics can exalt ‘as surely as poetry’. This is especially true of one equation: ei(pi) + 1 = 0, the brainchild of Leonhard Euler, the Mozart of mathematics. More than two centuries after Euler’s death, it is still regarded as a conceptual diamond of unsurpassed beauty. Called Euler’s identity or God’s equation, it includes just five numbers but represents an astonishing revelation of hidden connections. It ties together everything from basic arithmetic to compound interest, the circumference of a circle, trigonometry, calculus, and even infinity. In David Stipp’s hands, Euler’s identity becomes a contemplative stroll through the glories of mathematics. The result is an ode to this magical field.
Mathematics | HC | $39.99

All the Gallant Men: An American Sailor’s Firsthand Account of Pearl Harbor
Stratton, Donald & Gire, Ken
At 8:10 am on December 7, 1941, Seaman First Class Donald Stratton was consumed by an inferno. A million pounds of explosives had detonated beneath his battle station aboard the USS Arizona, barely fifteen minutes into Japan’s surprise attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor. Near death and burned across two thirds of his body, Don, a nineteen-year-old Nebraskan who had been steeled by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, summoned the will to haul himself hand over hand across a rope tethered to a neighbouring vessel. Forty-five feet below, the harbor’s flaming, oil-slick water boiled with enemy bullets; all around him the world tore itself apart. In this extraordinary, never-before-told eyewitness account of the Pearl Harbor attack–the only memoir ever written by a survivor of the USS Arizona–ninety-four-year-old veteran Donald Stratton finally shares his unforgettable personal tale of bravery and survival on December 7, 1941, his harrowing recovery, and his inspiring determination to return to the fight. Don and four other sailors made it safely across the same line that morning, a small miracle on a day that claimed the lives of 1,177 of their Arizona shipmates–approximately half the American fatalities at Pearl Harbor. Sent to military hospitals for a year, Don refused doctors’ advice to amputate his limbs and battled to relearn how to walk. The US Navy gave him a medical discharge, believing he would never again be fit for service, but Don had unfinished business. In June 1944, he sailed back into the teeth of the Pacific War on a destroyer, destined for combat in the crucial battles of Leyte Gulf, Luzon, and Okinawa, thus earning the distinction of having been present for the opening shots and the final major battle of America’s Second World War. As the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack approaches, Don, a great-grandfather of five and one of six living survivors of the Arizona, offers an unprecedentedly intimate reflection on the tragedy that drew America into the greatest armed conflict in history. All the Gallant Men is a book for the ages, one of the most remarkable–and remarkably inspiring–memoirs, of any kind, to appear in recent years.
Memoir/military history | TP | $29.99

A Matter of Honour: Pearl Harbor: Betrayal, Blame, and a Family’s Quest for Justice
Summers, Anthony & Swan, Robbyn
We thought we knew the story well: On December 7, 1941, 2,403 Americans died when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, devastating the nation and precipitating entry into World War II. In the aftermath, Admiral Husband Kimmel, commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet, was relieved of command, accused of dereliction of duty, and publicly disgraced. The fact was, however, that – through sheer inefficiency – the top brass in Washington had failed to provide Kimmel with vital intelligence. Then, in the name of protecting the biggest US intelligence secret of the day, they and top officials allowed the Admiral and the Army commander in Hawaii to be made scapegoats for the catastrophe. The Admiral fought to clear his name for the rest of his long life. After Kimmel’s death, his sons – both Navy veterans – continued the fight. Both houses of Congress approved the posthumous restoration of the Admiral’s four-star rank, only to be blocked by the Navy bureaucracy. Today, Kimmel’s grandchildren maintain the struggle – for them, it is a matter of honour. In this conversation-changing book, Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan go far beyond the fall and fight back of one man. They unravel the many apparent mysteries of Pearl Harbor, clear President Franklin D Roosevelt of the charge that he knew the attack was coming, and uncover duplicity and betrayal in high places in Washington.
Military history | TP | $32.99

Under the Knife: A History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations
van de Laar, Arnold
The history of surgery in 28 famous operations – from Louis XIV to JFK, and from Einstein to Houdini. Surgeon Arnold Van de Laar uses his own experience and expertise to tell the witty history of the past, present and future of surgery. From the story of the desperate man from seventeenth-century Amsterdam who grimly cut a stone out of his own bladder to Bob Marley’s deadly toe, Under the Knife offers all kinds of fascinating and unforgettable insights into medicine and history via the operating theatre. What happens during an operation? How does the human body respond to being attacked by a knife, a bacterium, a cancer cell or a bullet? And, as medical advances continuously push the boundaries of what medicine can cure, what are the limits of surgery? From the dark centuries of bloodletting and of amputations without anaesthetic to today’s sterile, high-tech operating theatres, Under the Knife is both a rich cultural history, and a modern anatomy class for us all.
History of surgery | TP | $32.99