Non-Fiction Catalogue: January 2019

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in February 2019.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $8.30
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.85
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

US Soldier vs Afrikakorps Soldier: Tunisia 1943 (Combat 38)
Campbell, David & Noon, Steve (illustrator)
Operation Torch, launched on 8 November 1942, landed Anglo-American forces in Vichy-controlled Morocco and Algeria to create a second front against the Axis forces in North Africa, catching Rommel’s German and Italian forces in the claws of a giant pincer. The US Army was powerfully well armoured and equipped, but fresh to war, and it showed. Organisation suffered from a surfeit of peacetime theories and training was insufficient and ill-applied. Despite such failings, the US GIs and their commanders learned very quickly, adapting to German tactics and the realities of mechanised warfare. The Axis forces in North Africa were seasoned by years of fighting against increasingly-powerful British and Commonwealth forces, and were led by one of the Reich’s most capable generals. The German doctrine of mechanised warfare had proved itself time and again, but ever-growing logistical and supply problems were blunting its effectiveness. From Sidi Bou Zid to El Guettar, this fully illustrated study pits the US Army against the best that the Axis forces in Africa had to offer.
Military history | PBK | $29.99

Smolensk 1943: the Red Army’s Relentless Advance (Campaign 331)
Forczyk, Robert & Hook, Adam (illustrator)
With the German defeat at Kursk, the Soviet Stavka (high command) ordered the Western and Kalinin Fronts to launch Operation Suvorov, in order to liberate the city of Smolensk. The Germans had held this city for two years and Heeresgruppe Mitte’s (Army Group Centre) 4. Armee had heavily fortified the region. The Soviet offensive began in August 1943 and they quickly realised that the German defences were exceedingly tough; and that the Western Front had not prepared adequately for an extended offensive. Consequently, the Soviets were forced to pause their offensive after only two weeks, in order to replenish their combat forces and then begin again. The German 4. Armee was commanded by Generaloberst Gotthard Heinrici, one of the Wehrmacht’s top defensive experts. Although badly outnumbered, Heinrici’s army gamely held off two Soviet fronts for seven weeks. Eventually, the 4. Armee’s front was finally broken and Smolensk was liberated on 25 September 1943. However, the Western Front was too exhausted to pursue Heinrici’s defeated army, which retreated to the fortified cities of Vitebsk, Orsha, and Mogilev; the 4. Armee would hold these cities until the destruction of Army Group Centre in June 1944. Operation Suvorov focuses on a major offensive that is virtually unknown in the West; and which set the stage for the decisive defeat of Heeresgruppe Mitte in the next summer offensive.
Military history | PBK | $32.99

Ju 88 Aces of World War 2 (Aircraft of the Aces 133)
Forsyth, Robert & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
Initially designed as a fast, medium bomber, the Junkers Ju 88 was also used as a Zerstörer heavy fighter by the Luftwaffe. It saw its combat debut over Poland in 1939, and heavy fighter variants saw action on every front up to VE Day. The ultimate Ju 88 fighter variant was the G-model of 1944, which boasted a FuG 220 or 227 radar, an astounding array of cannon and machine gun armament and advanced Junkers Jumo or BMW engines. A dedicated nightfighter, the first Ju 88G-1s entered service with the Nachtjagd, in the summer of 1944, replacing Ju 88C/Rs, as well as some Bf 110Gs. Despite suffering heavy losses in the final months of the war, Ju 88Gs also inflicted serious casualties on Bomber Command throughout the war. From patrolling over the Bay of Biscay, to the Arctic circle opposing Allied convoys and, most successfully, as radar-equipped nightfighters engaging RAF heavy bombers during defence of the Reich operations from late 1941, this is the story of the Ju 88 aces who menaced Allied aircraft and shipping throughout World War 2.
Aviation history | PBK | $29.99

Hellcat vs Shiden/Shiden-Kai: Pacific Theatre 1944–45 (Duel 91)
Holmes, Tony & Laurier, Jim; Hector, Gareth (illustrators)
By the early months of 1944 in the Pacific, the US Navy’s burgeoning force of carrier-based F6F-3/5 Hellcats had pretty much wiped the skies clear of Japanese fighters during a series of one-sided aerial engagements. However, starting in October they faced the superb Kawanishi N1K1/2 Shiden/Shiden-Kai, a formidable fighter with improved armament, a powerful engine and excellent manoeuvrability that in contrast to earlier Japanese fighters had the ability to withstand a greater degree of battle damage. Japanese pilots using this aircraft would claim more than 170 aerial victories over Kyushu and whilst escorting Kamikazes attacking Allied ships off Okinawa. US Navy Hellcat pilots in turn were credited with many of the scores of Shiden-Kais that were downed attempting to defend Japan. This fully illustrated book compares these two fascinating aircraft, using specially commissioned artwork, first-hand accounts and a thorough technical analysis.
Aviation history | PBK | $29.99

Air Combat: Dogfights of World War II (general aviation)
Khazanov, Dmitriy; Medved, Aleksander; Young, Edward M; Holmes, Tony
The battle for the skies in World War II fuelled a race between rival air forces to develop ever faster and more capable fighter aircraft – and the struggle for air superiority was never over until the war itself ended. This volume explores four clashes of some of the finest planes and pilots, in key theatres of the war: Spitfires duelling the formidable Bf 109 over the Channel; the Fw 190 battling the Soviet La 5 and 7 on the Eastern Front; the F4F Wildcat in a desperate clash with the legendary A6M Zero-sen; and the F4U Corsair in combat with the second-generation Japanese Ki-84 in the closing days of the war. Fully illustrated with contemporary photographs, maps and colour artwork, Air Combat conveys the full story behind these dramatic aviation duels.
Aviation history | HC | $50.00

French Battleships 1914–45 (New Vanguard 266)
Noppen, Ryan K & Wright, Paul (illustrator)
On September 1, 1910, France became the last great naval power to lay down a dreadnought battleship, the Courbet. The ensuing Courbet and Bretagne-class dreadnoughts had a relatively quiet World War I, spending most of it at anchor off the entrance to the Adriatic, keeping watch over the Austro-Hungarian fleet. The constraints of the Washington Naval Treaty prevented new battleships being built until the 1930s, with the innovative Dunkerque-class and excellent Richelieu-class of battleships designed to counter new German designs. After the fall of France in 1940, the dreadnoughts and fast battleships of the Marine Nationale had the unique experience of firing against German, Italian, British, and American targets during the war. This authoritative study examines these fascinating ships, using detailed colour plates and historical photographs, taking them from their inception before World War I, through their service in World War II including the scuttling of the French fleet at Toulon in 1943, and the service of Richelieu in the war against Japan.
Naval history | PBK | $22.99

 

General non-fiction

Gravity (Ladybird Expert)
al-Khalili, Jim
Gravity is an accessible and authoritative introduction to a force as familiar to us as breathing. Written by celebrated physicist and broadcaster Jim al-Khalili, Gravity proves to be so much more than the adage: ‘what goes up must come down’. Stuck to the surface of our planet, we experience gravity merely as a force pulling us down to the ground, but we will discover that it is far richer than that. Inside, you’ll learn that gravity is not really a ‘force’ at all, but something altogether more profound. In fact, gravity controls the very shape of space and the passage of time themselves and, as such, the history and destiny of the entire Universe.
Science | HC | $19.99

Empty Planet: the Shock of Global Population Decline
Bricker, Darrell & Ibbitson, John
For half a century, statisticians, pundits and politicians have warned that population growth is spiralling out of control, threatening to overwhelm the earth’s resources. They are wrong. Empty Planet shows why exactly the opposite will soon be upon us. A radical, provocative argument that the global population will soon begin to decline, dramatically reshaping the social, political and economic landscape. For half a century, statisticians, pundits and politicians have warned that a burgeoning planetary population will soon overwhelm the earth’s resources. But a growing number of experts are sounding a different kind of alarm. Rather than growing exponentially, they argue, the global population is headed for a steep decline. Throughout history, depopulation was the product of catastrophe: ice ages, plagues, the collapse of civilisations. This time, however, we’re thinning ourselves deliberately, by choosing to have fewer babies than we need to replace ourselves. In much of the developed and developing world, that decline is already underway, as urbanisation, women’s empowerment, and waning religiosity lead to smaller and smaller families. In Empty Planet, Ibbitson and Bricker travel from South Florida to Sao Paulo, Seoul to Nairobi, Brussels to Delhi to Beijing, drawing on a wealth of research and firsthand reporting to illustrate the dramatic consequences of this population decline – and to show us why the rest of the developing world will soon join in. They find that a smaller global population will bring with it a number of benefits: fewer workers will command higher wages; good jobs will prompt innovation; the environment will improve; the risk of famine will wane; and falling birth rates in the developing world will bring greater affluence and autonomy for women. But enormous disruption lies ahead, too. We can already see the effects in Europe and parts of Asia, as aging populations and worker shortages weaken the economy and impose crippling demands on healthcare and vital social services. There may be earth-shaking implications on a geopolitical scale as well. Empty Planet is a hugely important book for our times. Captivating and persuasive, it is a story about urbanisation, access to education and the empowerment of women to choose their own destinies. It is about the secularisation of societies and the vital role that immigration has to play in our futures. Rigorously researched and deeply compelling, Empty Planet offers a vision of a future that we can no longer prevent – but one that we can shape, if we choose to.
Demography/Geography/Society and culture | TP | $32.99

Earth from Space
Bright, Michael & Sarosh, Chloe
With over 200 spectacular images, including astonishing satellite images and stills from the BBC Natural History Unit’s footage, Earth from Space reveals our planet as you’ve never seen it before. For decades, we competed to be the first to reach space, but it was when we looked back at Earth that we were truly awestruck. Now, for the first time, using advanced satellite images we can show the earth’s surface, its mega structures, weather patterns and natural wonders in breathtaking detail. From the colours and patterns that make up our planet to the mass migrations and seismic changes that shape it, Earth from Space sheds new light on the planet we call home. It reveals the intimate stories behind the breathtaking images, following herds of elephants crossing the plains of Africa and turtles travelling on ocean currents that are invisible unless seen from space. The true colours of our blue planet are revealed, from the striped tulip fields of Holland to the green swirl of a plankton super bloom that attracts a marine feeding frenzy. Whether it’s the world’s largest beaver dam – so remote it was only discovered through satellite imagery – or newly-formed islands born from volcanic eruptions, discover a new perspective on our ever-changing planet.
Science | HC | $55.00

Directorate S: the CIA and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2001–2016
Coll, Steve
In the wake of the terrible shock of 9/11, the CIA scrambled to work out how to destroy Bin Laden and his associates. The CIA had long familiarity with Afghanistan and had worked closely with the Taliban to defeat the Soviet Union there. A tangle of assumptions, old contacts, favours and animosities were now reactivated. Superficially the invasion was quick and efficient, but Bin Laden’s successful escape, together with that of much of the Taliban leadership, and a catastrophic failure to define the limits of NATO’s mission in a tough, impoverished country the size of Texas, created a quagmire which lasted many years. At the heart of the problem lay ‘Directorate S’, a highly-secretive arm of the Pakistan state which had its own views on the Taliban and Afghanistan’s place in a wider competition for influence between Pakistan, India, and China, and which assumed that the USA and its allies would soon be leaving. Steve Coll’s remarkable book tells a powerful, bitter story of just how badly foreign policy decisions can go wrong and of many lives lost.
Espionage/society and culture | PBK | $26.99

Secret Pigeon Service: Operation Columba, Resistance
and the Struggle to Liberate Occupied Europe

Corera, Gordon
Gordon Corera uses declassified documents and extensive original research to tell the story of MI14(d) and the Secret Pigeon Service, for the first time. Between 1941 and 1944, sixteen thousand plucky homing pigeons were dropped in an arc from Bordeaux to Copenhagen as part of ‘Columba’ – a secret British operation to bring back intelligence from those living under Nazi occupation. The messages flooded back written on tiny pieces of rice paper tucked into canisters and tied to the legs of the birds. Authentic voices from rural France, the Netherlands, and Belgium – they were sometimes comic, often tragic and occasionally invaluable with details of German troop movements and fortifications, new Nazi weapons, radar system or the deployment of the feared V-1 and V-2 rockets that terrorised London. Who were the people who provided this rich seam of intelligence? Many were not trained agents nor, with a few exceptions, people with any experience of spying. At the centre of this book is the ‘Leopold Vindictive’ network – a small group of Belgian villagers prepared to take huge risks. They were led by an extraordinary priest, Joseph Raskin – a man connected to royalty and whose intelligence was so valuable it was shown to Churchill, leading MI6 to parachute agents in, to assist him. A powerful and tragic tale of wartime espionage, the book brings together the British and Belgian sides of the Leopold Vindictive’s story and reveals, for the first time, the wider history of a quirky, quarrelsome band of spy masters and their special wartime operations, as well as how bitter rivalries, in London, placed the lives of secret agents at risk. It is a book not so much about pigeons as the remarkable people living in occupied Europe who were faced with the choice of how to respond to a call for help, and took the decision to resist. ‘This is an amazing story’ – Simon Mayo, BBC Radio 2.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

Origins: How the Earth Made Us
Dartnell, Lewis
When we talk about human history, we focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us? As a species we are shaped by our environment. Geological forces drove our evolution in East Africa; mountainous terrain led to the development of democracy in Greece; and today voting behaviour in the United States follows the bed of an ancient sea. The human story is the story of these forces, from plate tectonics and climate change, to atmospheric circulation and ocean currents. How are the Himalayas linked to the orbit of the Earth, and to the formation of the British Isles? By taking us billions of years into our planet’s past, Professor Lewis Dartnell tells us the ultimate origin story. When we reach the point, where history becomes science, we see a vast web of connections that underwrites our modern world and helps us face the challenges of the future. From the cultivation of the first crops to the founding of modern states, Origins reveals the Earth’s awesome impact on the shape of human civilisations.
Science | TP | $35.00

The Mind of God (Popular Penguins)
Davies, Paul
Paul Davies’ The Mind of God is a scientific search for the meaning of the universe. Ranging across the cosmos, Davies explores the origin of the universe, the laws of nature, mathematics, the beginning and end of everything. Ultimately, he seeks to provide a glimpse the meaning of it all. This is a book no inquisitive mind can do without.
Science | PBK | $12.99

The Four Horsemen: the Discussion that Sparked an Atheist Revolution
Dawkins, Richard; Harris, Sam; Dennett, Daniel C; Hitchens, Christopher
Known as the ‘four horsemen’ of New Atheism, these four big thinkers of the twenty-first century met only once. Their electrifying examination of ideas on this remarkable occasion was intense and wide-ranging. Everything that was said as they agreed and disagreed with one another, interrogated ideas and exchanged insights – about religion and atheism, science and sense – speaks with urgency to our present age. Questions they asked of each other included: ‘Is it ever possible to win a war of ideas? Is spirituality the preserve of the religious? Are there any truths you would rather not know? Would you want to see the end of faith?’ The dialogue was recorded, and is now transcribed and presented here, with new introductions from the surviving three horsemen. With a sparkling introduction from Stephen Fry, it makes essential reading for all their admirers; and for anyone interested in exploring the tensions between faith and reason.
Science/Philosophy and religion | HC | $24.99

Born to Be Posthumous: the Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey
Dery, Mark
From The Gashlycrumb Tinies to The Doubtful Guest, Edward Gorey’s wickedly funny and deliciously sinister little books have influenced our culture in innumerable ways, from the works of Tim Burton and Neil Gaiman to Lemony Snicket. Some even call him the Grandfather of Goth. But who was this man, who lived with over twenty thousand books and six cats, who roomed with Frank O’Hara at Harvard, and was known – in the late 1940s, no less – to traipse around in full-length fur coats, clanking bracelets, and an Edwardian beard? An eccentric, a gregarious recluse, an enigmatic auteur of whimsically morbid masterpieces, yes – but who was the real Edward Gorey, behind the Oscar Wildean pose? He published over a hundred books and illustrated works by Samuel Beckett, T S Eliot, Edward Lear, John Updike, Charles Dickens, Hilaire Belloc, Muriel Spark, Bram Stoker, Gilbert and Sullivan, and others. At the same time, he was a deeply complicated and conflicted individual, a man whose art reflected his obsessions with the disquieting and the darkly hilarious. Based on newly uncovered correspondence and interviews with personalities as diverse as John Ashbery, Donald Hall, Lemony Snicket, Neil Gaiman, and Anna Sui, Born to be Posthumous draws back the curtain on the eccentric genius and mysterious life of Edward Gorey.
Biography | HC | $34.99

Courage in the Skies: the untold story of Qantas, its brave men and women
and their extraordinary role in World War II

Eames, Jim
Between 1942 and 1943, Qantas lost eight aircraft during its involvement in Australia’s war against the Japanese. Over sixty passengers and crew died as a result. Yet, Qantas’ exemplary contribution to Australia’s war effort and the courage of its people in those difficult times has been forgotten. Courage in the Skies is the remarkable story of Qantas at war and the truly heroic deeds of its crew and ground staff as the Japanese advanced towards Australia. Flying unarmed planes through war zones and at times under enemy fire, the airline supplied the front lines, evacuated the wounded and undertook surprising escapes, including carrying more than forty anxious civilians, on the last aircraft to leave besieged Singapore. Absorbing, spirited and fast-paced, above all this is a story of an extraordinary group of Australians who confronted the dark days of World War II with bravery, commitment and initiative. They just happened to be Qantas people. ‘In this most readable book, Jim Eames captures the experiences of a small band of brave, professional and pioneering aircrew who confronted the dangers of war, the challenges of unforgiving oceanic and tropical weather and the uncertainty of navigation in unarmed flying boats and conventional aircraft.’ – Air Chief Marshal Sir Angus Houston AK, AFC (Ret’d).
Aviation history | PBK | $22.99

GameTek: What games can teach us about life, the universe and ourselves
Engelstein, Geoffrey
If you shuffle a deck of cards, what are the odds that sequence has occurred before? What is the connection between dice, platonic solids and Newton’s theory of gravity? What is more random: a dice tower or a number generator? Can you actually employ a strategy for a game as basic as Deal or No Deal? These are all questions that are thrown up in games and life. Games involve chance, choice, competition, innovation, randomness, memory, stand-offs and paradoxes – aspects that designers manipulate to make a game interesting, fun and addictive, and players try to master for enjoyment and winning. But they also provide a fascinating way for us to explore our world; to understand how our minds tick, our numbers add up, and our laws of physics work. This is a book that tackles the big questions of life through the little questions of games. With short chapters on everything from Rock, Paper, Scissors, to the Prisoner’s Dilemma, to Goedel’s theorems, to Axis and Allies, GameTek is fascinating reading anyone for who wants to explore the world from a new perspective – and a must-read book for serious designers and players.
Mathematics/Science | TP | $34.99

Bullshit Jobs: the Rise of Pointless Work, and What We Can Do About It
Graeber, David
Back in 1930, the economist John Maynard Keynes prophesied that by the century’s end, technology would see us all working fifteen-hour weeks. But instead, something curious happened. Today, average working hours have not decreased, but increased. And now, across the developed world, three-quarters of all jobs are in services or admin, jobs that don’t seem to add anything to society: bullshit jobs. In Bullshit Jobs, David Graeber explores how this phenomenon – one more associated with the 20th-century Soviet Union, but which capitalism was supposed to eliminate – has happened. In doing so, he looks at how we value work, and how, rather than being productive, work has become an end in itself; the way such work maintains the current broken system of finance capital; and, finally, how we can get out of it.
Labour economics/Psychology | PBK | $22.99

Midnight in Chernobyl: the Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster
Higginbotham, Adam
The dramatic, untold story of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster based on original reporting and new archival research. Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers not only its own citizens, but all of humanity. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful non-fiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth. Midnight in Chernobyl is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will – lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats – remain not just vital, but necessary.
History/Science | TP | $35.00

Out of this World: How NASA Created the Best Team on the Planet
Hill, Paul Sean
Find out how NASA creates and leads stellar teams and how you can bring Mission Control leadership to your organisation. Failure is always an option… For more than 50 years, NASA’s Mission Control has been known for two things: perfect decision making in extreme situations and producing generations of steely-eyed missile men and women who continue that tradition. A key to that legacy of brilliant performance is a particular brand of leadership, especially at the working level in Mission Control. Take the ultimate insiders look at the leadership values and culture that created the best team on this planet. Paul Sean Hill was responsible for NASA’s Mission Operations support for manned space flight from 2007–11. In this candid book he shows that the secret to Mission Control’s success has never been rocket science and that the real practice of perfect decision making can be applied to any organisation or team. By demonstrating how his Mission Control team nurtured a culture which has delivered impossible wins for decades, Hill provides a guide for all leaders to boost their company’s performance at all levels. Whether failure means cost and schedule overruns, quality reduction, loss of market share, bankruptcy – or putting someone’s life a risk, how we lead can determine whether even small mistakes are dealt with or are left to snowball out of control and destroy an enterprise. Discover how to take leadership from the Mission Control Room to your boardroom and beyond, and achieve this out-of-this-world leadership environment in your team.
Management studies | TP | $32.99

Plato’s Republic (Ladybird Expert)
Hobbes, Angie
Plato’s Republic is an accessible, authoritative, and timely introduction to the influential dialogue that helped shape all Western literature and philosophy. Written by distinguished philosopher and professor Angie Hobbs, Plato’s Republic explores the age-old dilemma: Why should I be just? What is a just society, and how can it be created? With strikingly relevant questions such as: How can women’s potential be actualised? How are democracies subverted by demagogues and tyrants? How dangerous are ‘alternative facts’ and what can we do about them? This text is still essential reading.
Philosophy | HC | $19.99

Æthelflæd: England’s Forgotten Founder (Ladybird Expert)
Holland, Tom
Æthelflæd is an accessible, authoritative, and enlightening introduction to the most influential woman that English history forgot. Today, few remember Æthelflæd. The daughter, sister and aunt of great kings, she was a ruler as remarkable as any of them. She planted cities, she sponsored learning, and she defeated the enemies of her people. It was on the foundations laid by Æthelflæd that a new kingdom would come to be built: a kingdom that lasts to this day. Written by historian Tom Holland, Æthelflæd puts a spotlight on this formidable leader, pulling her out of the shadowy history of the dark ages. England owes much to her founding mother.
History | HC | $19.99

Threads of Life: a History of the World Through the Eye of a Needle
Hunter, Clare
A history of sewing and embroidery, told through the stories of the men and women, over centuries and across continents, who have used the language of sewing to make their voices heard, even in the most desperate of circumstances. From the political storytelling of the Bayeux tapestry’s anonymous embroiderers and Mary, Queen of Scots’ treasonous stitching, to the sewing of First World War soldiers suffering from PTSD and the banner-makers at Greenham Common, Threads of Life stretches from medieval France to 1980s’ America, from a Second World War POW camp in Singapore to a family attic in Scotland. It is as much about identity, protest, memory, and politics as craft and artistry. In an eloquent blend of history and memoir with a unique understanding of craft, Clare Hunter’s Threads of Life is an evocative and moving book about the need, we all have, to tell our story.
History | TP | $32.99

The Future Is Asian: Global Order in the Twenty-first Century
Khanna, Parag
Leading global strategist Parag Khanna explains how Asia is reshaping the entire planet and setting a new template for our collective future. Five billion people, two-thirds of the world’s mega-cities, one-third of the global economy, two-thirds of global economic growth, thirty of the Fortune 100, six of the ten largest banks, eight of the ten largest armies, five nuclear powers, massive technological innovation, the newest crop of top-ranked universities. Asia is also the world’s most ethnically, linguistically and culturally diverse region of the planet, eluding any remotely meaningful generalisation beyond the geographic label itself. Even for Asians, Asia is dizzying to navigate. Whether you gauge by demography, geography, economy, or any other metric, Asia is already the present – and it is certainly the future. It is for this reason that we cannot afford to continue to get Asia so wrong. The Future Is Asian accurately shows Asia from the inside-out, telling the story of how this mega-region is coming together and reshaping the entire planet in the process.
Economics/Geopolitics | TP | $35.00

Surveillance Valley: the Secret Military History of the Internet
Levine, Yasha
An explosive, revisionist history of the dark past, and darker present of the internet. As the Cambridge Analytica scandal has shown, private corporations consider it their right to use our data (and by extension, us) – whichever way they see fit. Looking at the hidden origins of many internet corporations and platforms, Levine shows that this is a function, not a bug of the online experience. Beginning as a surveillance tool developed by ARPA for the Vietnam War, the internet has become essential to our lives. Despite repeated revelations of hacks, malware, government surveillance and corporate corruption, however, few of us stop to consider that the internet was developed, from the outset, as a weapon. Now, ever more famous Silicon Valley companies (which we are encouraged to view as neutral, even idealistic businesses) are entering into partnerships with the US government. Clearly demonstrating how the same military objectives and control systems that drove the development of early internet technology are still at the heart of Silicon Valley (including as features of many so called ‘safe’ platforms, like Tor or Signal) today, this revelatory and sweeping story will change the way you think about the most powerful, ubiquitous tool ever created.
Technology/History | TP | $32.99

Apollo 13
Lovell, James & Kluger, Jeffrey
The classic story of endurance, heroism and survival, co-authored by the commander of the Apollo 13 mission. April 13, 1970. Astronauts Jim Lovell, Fred Haise and Jack Swigert are hurtling towards the moon in the Apollo 13 spacecraft, when an explosion rocks the ship. The cockpit grows dim, the air grows thin, and the instrument lights wink out. Moments later, the astronauts are forced to abandon the main ship, for the tiny lunar module – designed to keep two men alive for just two days. But there are three men aboard and they are four days from home. As the action shifts from the disabled ship to the frantic engineers at Mission Control to Lovell’s anxious family, Apollo 13 brilliantly recreates the harrowing, heroic mission in all its drama and glory. This gripping story of human endurance is the basis for Ron Howard’s classic film starring Tom Hanks and Kevin Bacon.
Science/Astronomical exploration/Biography | PBK | $22.99

Cities of the Classical World
McEvedy, Colin
From Alexandria to York, this unique illustrated guide shows us the great centres of classical civilisation afresh. The book’s key feature is 120 specially-drawn maps tracing each city’s thoroughfares and defences, monuments and places of worship. Every map is to the same scale, allowing readers for the first time to appreciate visually the relative sizes of Babylon and Paris, London, and Constantinople. There are also clear, incisive commentaries on each city’s development, strategic importance, rulers and ordinary inhabitants. This compelling and elegant atlas opens a new window on to the ancient world, and will transform the way we see it.
History | PBK | $29.99

Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe
McNamee, Roger
This is the dramatic story of how a noted tech venture capitalist, an early mentor to Mark Zuckerberg and investor in his company, woke up to the serious damage Facebook was doing to our society and set out to try to stop it. If you had told Roger McNamee, three years ago, that he would soon be devoting himself to stopping Facebook from destroying democracy, he would have howled with laughter. He had mentored many tech leaders in his illustrious career as an investor, but few things had made him prouder, or been better for his fund’s bottom line, than his early service to Mark Zuckerberg. Still a large shareholder in Facebook, he had every good reason to stay on the bright side. Until he simply couldn’t. Zucked is McNamee’s intimate reckoning with the catastrophic failure of the head of one of the world’s most powerful companies to face up to the damage he is doing. It’s a story that begins with a series of rude awakenings. First, there is the author’s dawning realisation that the platform is being manipulated by some very bad actors. Then there is the even more unsettling realisation that Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg are unable or unwilling to share his concerns, polite as they may be to his face. And then comes Brexit and the election of Donald Trump, and the emergence of one horrific piece of news after another about the malign ends to which the Facebook platform has been put. To McNamee’s shock, Facebook’s leaders still duck and dissemble, viewing the matter as a public relations problem. Now thoroughly alienated, McNamee digs into the issue, and fortuitously meets up with some fellow travellers who share his concerns; and help him sharpen its focus. Soon, he and a dream team of Silicon Valley technologists are charging into the fray, to raise consciousness about the existential threat of Facebook, and the persuasion architecture of the attention economy more broadly – to our public health and to our political order. Zucked is both an enthralling personal narrative and a masterful explication of the forces that have conspired to place us all on the horns of this dilemma. This is the story of a company and its leadership, but it’s also a larger tale of a business sector unmoored from normal constraints, at a moment of political and cultural crisis, the worst possible time to be given new tools for summoning the darker angels of our nature and whipping them into a frenzy. This is a wise, hard-hitting, and urgently necessary account that crystallises the issue definitively for the rest of us.
Technology/Society and culture | TP | $32.99

Digital Minimalism: On Living Better with Less Technology
Newport, Cal
Most of us know that addiction to digital tools is costing us both productivity and peace. But giving them up completely isn’t realistic. We’re addicted to texting, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter not because we’re stupid or shallow, but because they provide real value in the form of connection, community, affirmation, and information. Instagram is how you see new photos of your school friend’s baby. Texting is how you let your mum know you’re safe in a storm. Twitter is how you hear about breaking news in your industry. But these tools can also disrupt our ability to focus on meaningful work and live fully in the present. Must we choose between one, or the other? Newport’s answer is no. In Digital Minimalism, he outlines a practical philosophy and plan for a mindful, intentional use of technology that maximises its benefits while minimising its drain on our attention, focus and time. Demonstrating how to implement a 30-day digital detox, this book will help you identify which uses of technology are, actually, helping you reach your goals, and which are holding you back. If you care about improving your effectiveness, but don’t want to become a Luddite or a social dropout this book can lead you to increased control over your time, attention, and energy and ultimately, a richer life. Read Digital Minimalism and you’ll never again mindlessly sacrifice your productivity to clickbait or lose 40 minutes of your evening to your Instagram feed.
Impact of technology/Society and culture | TP | $32.99

A Spy Named Orphan: the Enigma of Donald Maclean
Philipps, Roland
A gripping tale of betrayal and counter-betrayal that tells the story of the most enigmatic member of the Cambridge spy ring – Donald Maclean. Donald Maclean was a star diplomat, an establishment insider and a keeper of some of the West’s greatest secrets. He was also a Russian spy… Codenamed ‘Orphan’ by his Russian recruiter, Maclean was Britain’s most gifted traitor. But as he leaked huge amounts of top-secret intelligence, an international code-breaking operation was rapidly closing in on him. Moments before he was unmasked, Maclean escaped to Moscow. Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, A Spy Named Orphan now tells this story for the first time in full, revealing the character and devastating impact of perhaps the most dangerous Soviet agent of the twentieth century.
Biography/Espionage/history | PBK | $22.99

The Tale of Peter Rabbit
Potter, Beatrix
One small hop for a rabbit… One giant leap for mankind. This limited edition of The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a must-have for Potter and space enthusiasts alike. It tells the iconic tale of Peter Rabbit, while celebrating the cultural impact and scientific achievement of the Apollo 11 moon landing, 50 years ago in July 1969. To celebrate an iconic cultural moment in human history, we have designed this playful and stylish imagining of one small rabbit, landing on one large moon. Taking one of the best-loved tales and one of the most globally admired human achievements, the two marry perfectly to create this wonderfully playful imagining. With the original Tale of Peter Rabbit in full colour, encased in a visually-stunning space cover and endpapers; modern meets classic with extraordinary results.
Children’s fiction/Moon landing | HC | $19.99

On the Origin of Species (illustrated, children’s edition)
Radeva, Sabina & Darwin, Charles
The first-ever picture-book retelling of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species; this accessible work brings evolution to the younger generation through stylish illustrations and a simple, easy-to-understand text. On the Origin of Species has been the definitive explanation of the theory of evolution, since it was first published in 1859. Now, molecular biologist and illustrator Sabina Radeva unites her two passions to create a 48-page retelling of this seminal text. Pulling together Darwin’s observations from his travels around the world and his ground-breaking – and controversial – explanation of how species form, develop and change over hundreds of thousands of years, On the Origin of Species is as relevant and important now, as it ever was.
Science | HC | $27.99

Darwin Comes to Town: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution
Schilthuizen, Menno
We are marching towards a future in which three-quarters of humans live in cities, more than half of the landmass of the planet is urbanised, and the rest is covered by farms, pasture, and plantations. Increasingly, as we become ever more city centric, species and ecosystems crafted by millions of years of evolution teeter on the brink of extinction – or have already disappeared. A growing band of ‘urban ecologists’ is beginning to realise that natural selection is not so easily stopped. They are finding that more and more plants and animals are adopting new ways of living in the seemingly hostile environments of asphalt and steel that we humans have created. Carrion crows in the Japanese city of Sendai, for example, have learned to use passing traffic to crack nuts for them; otters and bobcats, no longer persecuted by humans, are waiting at the New York City gates; superb fairy-wrens in Australia have evolved different mating structures for nesting in strips of vegetation along roads; while distinct populations of London underground mosquitoes have been fashioned by the varied tube line environments. Menno Schilthuizen shows us that evolution can happen far more rapidly than Darwin had dared dream.
Evolution | PBK | $22.99

Apollo: the extraordinary visual history of the iconic space programme
Scott, Zack
Explore the iconic Apollo space missions and moon landings through these stunning infographics and data visualisations. If you like space, this book is for you. The Apollo Program ran from 1961 until 1972, and marks one of the greatest accomplishments in all of human endeavour – man walking on the moon. On 20 July 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin achieved this most remarkable feat, becoming the first humans to visit another celestial body. Apollo is an extraordinary visual history of the story of this iconic space program, based on recently-released NASA data about the various missions of that name. Using beautifully-designed infographics, Apollo takes us through all the astonishing facts and figures, as well as some quirky little-known details, and gives us a detailed and elegant history of the seventeen missions which saw twelve humans step on the surface of the moon. Apollo gives us an insight in to the incredible individuals who made that journey.
Science/Astronomical exploration | HC | $39.99

How to Lose a Country: the Seven Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship
Temelkuran, Ece
An urgent call to action from one of Europe’s most well-regarded political thinkers. How to Lose a Country: The Seven Steps from Democracy to Dictatorship is a field guide to spotting the insidious patterns and mechanisms of the populist wave sweeping the globe – before it’s too late. ‘It couldn’t happen here.’ Ece Temelkuran heard reasonable people in Britain say it, the night of the Brexit vote. She heard reasonable people in America say it, the night Trump’s election was soundtracked by chants of ‘Build that wall’. She heard reasonable people in Turkey say it, as Erdogan rigged elections, rebuilt the economy around cronyism, and labelled his opposition as terrorists. How to Lose a Country is an impassioned plea, a warning to the world that populism and nationalism don’t march fully-formed into government; they creep. Award-winning author and journalist, Ece Temelkuran identifies the early-warning signs of this phenomenon, sprouting up across the world, in order to define a global pattern, and arm the reader with the tools to root it out. Proposing alternative, global answers to the pressing – and too often paralysing – political questions of our time, Temelkuran explores the insidious idea of ‘real people’, the infantilisation of language and debate, the way laughter can prove a false friend, and the dangers of underestimating one’s opponent. She weaves memoir, history and clear-sighted argument into an urgent and eloquent defence of democracy. No longer can the reasonable comfort themselves with ‘it couldn’t happen here’. It is happening. And soon it may be too late.
Politics/Society and culture | TP | $27.99

Barney Greatrex: from Bomber Command to the French Resistance
– the stirring story of an Australian hero

Veitch, Michael
A school and university cadet in Sydney, Barney Greatrex signed up for RAF Bomber Command in 1941, eager to get straight into the very centre of the Allied counterattack. Bombing Germany night after night, Barney’s 61 Squadron faced continual enemy fighter attacks and anti-aircraft fire – death or capture by the Nazis loomed large. Very few survived more than 20 missions, and it was on his 20th mission, in 1944, that Barney’s luck finally ran out: he was shot down, over occupied France. But his war was far from over. Rescued by the French Resistance, Barney seized the opportunity to carry on fighting and joined the Maquis in the liberation of France from the occupying German forces, who rarely took prisoners. Later, Barney was awarded the French Legion of Honour, but for seventy years he said almost nothing of his incredible war service – surviving two of the most dangerous battlefronts. Aged 97, Barney Greatrex revealed his truly great Australian war story to acclaimed, bestselling author Michael Veitch. ‘… fascinating… Veitch brings the story vividly to life’ – Sydney Morning Herald.
Biography | PBK | $22.99

Talk to Me: Amazon, Google, Apple and the Race for Voice-Controlled AI
Vlahos, James
The next great technological disruption is coming. The titans of Silicon Valley are racing to build the last, best computer that the world will ever need. They know that whoever successfully creates it will revolutionise our relationship with technology – and make billions of dollars in the process. They call it conversational AI. Computers that can speak and think like humans do may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but they are rapidly moving towards reality. In Talk to Me, veteran tech journalist James Vlahos meets the researchers at Google, Amazon, and Apple – who are leading the way to a voice computing revolution. He explores how voice tech will transform every sector of society: handing untold new powers to businesses, upending traditional notions of privacy, revolutionising access to information, and fundamentally altering the way we understand human consciousness. And he even tries to understand the significance of the revolution, first hand – by building a chatbot version of his terminally-ill father. Vlahos’ research leads him to one fundamental question: What happens when our computers become as articulate, compassionate, and creative as we are?
Science and technology | TP | $35.00

Sugar: the world corrupted, from slavery to obesity
Walvin, James
The story of sugar, and of mankind’s desire for sweetness in food and drink is a compelling, though confusing story. It is also an historical story. The story of mankind’s love of sweetness – the need to consume honey, cane sugar, beet sugar and chemical sweeteners – has important historical origins. To take a simple example, two centuries ago, cane sugar was vital to the burgeoning European domestic and colonial economies. For all its recent origins, today’s obesity epidemic – if that is what it is – did not emerge overnight, but instead evolved from a complexity of historical forces which stretch back centuries. We can only fully understand this modern problem, by coming to terms with its genesis and history: and we need to consider the historical relationship between society and sweetness over a long historical span. This book seeks to do just that: to tell the story of how the consumption of sugar – the addition of sugar to food and drink – became a fundamental and increasingly troublesome feature of modern life. Walvin’s book is the heir to Sidney Mintz’s Sweetness and Power, a brilliant sociological account, but now thirty years old. In addition, the problem of sugar, and the consequent intellectual and political debate about the role of sugar, has been totally transformed in the years since that book’s publication.
History | PBK | $22.99

Ten Women Who Changed Science, and the World
Whitlock, Catherine & Evans, Rhodri
With a foreword by Athene Donald, Professor of Experimental Physics, University of Cambridge and Master of Churchill College. Ten Women Who Changed Science tells the moving stories of the physicists, biologists, chemists, astronomers and doctors who helped to shape our world with their extraordinary breakthroughs and inventions, and outlines their remarkable achievements. These scientists overcame significant obstacles, often simply because they were women their science and their lives were driven by personal tragedies and shaped by seismic world events. What drove these remarkable women to cure previously incurable diseases, disprove existing theories or discover new sources of energy? Some were rewarded with the Nobel Prize for their pioneering achievements – Madame Curie, twice – others were not; and, even if they had, many are not household names. Despite living during periods when the contribution of women was disregarded, if not ignored, these resilient women persevered with their research, whether creating life-saving drugs or expanding our knowledge of the cosmos. By daring to ask ‘How?’ and ‘Why?’ and persevering against the odds, each of these women, in a variety of ways, has made the world a better place.
Science | TP | $32.99

Nelson: the Battle of the Nile (Ladybird Expert)
Willis, Sam
Nelson: Battle of the Nile is an accessible and authoritative introduction to the naval battle that established Nelson’s fame. Written by historian, archaeologist, and broadcaster Sam Willis, Nelson: Battle of the Nile details the British Royal Navy’s glorious defeat of the French naval expedition, thwarting Napoleon’s plans to invade Egypt, jeopardising Britain’s trade routes and stake in India. The only way to stop Napoleon seemed to be at sea, and although Britain claimed victory in Aboukir Bay, the war was far from over… You’ll learn how the roots of this significant battle lie in the French Revolution, track Napoleon’s rise to prominence, and the effect of France’s move from revolution to dictatorship on the balance of power in Europe. This book will take you through the dramatic turning points of the battle and Nelson’s celebrated tactical leadership.
History | HC | $19.99

Shoot for the Moon
Wiseman, Richard
20 July 1969: Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. We’ve seen the footage, we’ve heard the history, we’ve marvelled at mankind’s great achievement. What we don’t know is what it takes for astronauts to stay focused, calm and prepared when facing the impossible. Having studied mission archives and first-person accounts of the Apollo 11 moon landings and examined recent psychological and neuroscientific research, Psychologist Richard Wiseman has uncovered NASA’s greatest untold discovery: the Apollo Mindset. And this is the missing manual. While mankind was making leaps in progress, the man who made it to the moon in the Apollo 11 Lunar Lander had taken many small steps in his mind to reach this landmark moment. Richard Wiseman is here to share the seven psychological principles you need to accomplish the impossible. While most of us won’t explore space, we can use the same ideas and techniques used by the team behind the Apollo 11 to accomplish your most far-reaching goals. Be it starting your own business, getting promoted or giving up the rat-race and pursuing your lifelong dream, the Apollo Mindset will help you to reach your own moon.
Psychology | TP | $32.99