Non-Fiction Catalogue: December 2019

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in December 2019.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • up to 500g: $8.95
  • 500g to 1kg: $12.20
  • 1kg to 3 kg: $15.35
  • 3kg to 5 kg: $18.50
  • anything above 5kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

Me 210/410 Zerstörer Units (Combat Aircraft 131)
Forsyth, Robert & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
Intended as a progressive development of the twin-engined Bf 110 Zerstörer (‘destroyer’ or heavy fighter), the Me 210 first took to the air in September 1939. However, due to a lack of sufficient flight-testing before being declared service ready, the Me 210 suffered from a less than satisfactory reputation in respect to its flight characteristics and weak undercarriage. After enhancements were made to the fuselage and wings, and the power of the plane was increased, the Me 210 became the Me 410, in late 1942. By this stage of the war much was expected of the two types, which were forced to fly in very dangerous skies over North Africa and in the defence of the German homeland. Both aircraft were deployed as heavy fighters, fighter-bombers, reconnaissance platforms and interceptors, seeing service with a number of different units. The Me 410 was fitted with 30 mm cannon, 21 cm underwing mortars and the colossal 5 cm BK cannon that was intended to pack a punch against the USAAF’s four-engined bombers which threatened the Reich in large numbers from 1943, onwards. In this title, supported by contemporary photography and full-colour artwork, Robert Forsyth tells the complex story of the Me 210 and 410, detailing their development and assessing their capabilities as combat aircraft.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Me 262 vs P-51 Mustang: Europe 1944–45 (Duel 100)
Forsyth, Robert & Laurier, Jim; Hector, Gareth (illustrators)
Arguably two of the finest fighters built during the course of World War II, the Me 262 and P-51 Mustang heralded new dawns in aircraft performance. Making its operational debut in the summer of 1944, and powered by the Jumo 004 jet engine, the Me 262 outclassed Allied planes in terms of speed and firepower ratio, offering a formidable punch with four 30 mm MK 108 nose-mounted cannons. However, in the P-51, fitted with the Rolls-Royce (Packard) Merlin engine and drop tanks, the USAAF finally had a fighter that had the ‘legs’ to escort its heavy bombers deep into Reich airspace and back. If flown to its strengths, the P-51 was more than capable of taking on the feared Me 262 on an equal footing, despite the differences in power and top speed. Indeed, the Mustang proved to be the Luftwaffe fighter arm’s nemesis. When the P-51D sortied over Germany from the summer of 1944 onwards, it shredded through the ill-trained and depleted Gruppen of the Luftwaffe’s defence wings. This book examines the two fighters in detail, exploring their history and development and containing accurate descriptions of the combats between the P-51 Mustang and the Me 262 in what were some of the most bitter and large-scale aerial actions fought over Europe, in 1944–45.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Tirpitz in Norway: X-craft midget submarines raid the fjords, Operation Source 1943 (Raid 51)
Konstam, Angus & Groult, Edouard A; Tooby, Adam (illustrators)
In September 1943, under the cover of darkness, six British midget submarines crept into the heart of enemy territory, penetrating a heavily guarded Norwegian fjord in an attempt to eliminate the threat of the powerful German battleship, the Tirpitz. Numerous previous attempts to attack the ship from both air and sea had failed, and this mission was carefully strategised, and undertaken by skilled operatives who had undergone extensive training in an isolated sea loch. Though five of the six X-Craft submarines were either lost or captured, two crews had just enough time to lay their explosive charges, which detonated after they were forced to the surface, putting the Tirpitz out of action, for a crucial six-month period. Masterminded from a top-secret naval headquarters on the east coast of Scotland, Operation Source has been memorialised as one of the most daring naval raids of World War II. This new study tells the complete story of this epic operation in unparalleled detail, supported by full-colour illustrations and contemporary photography.
Naval history | PBK | $32.99

Guadalcanal 1942–43:
Japan’s bid to knock out Henderson Field and the Cactus Air Force
(Air Campaign 13)

Stille, Mark & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
The campaign for Guadalcanal, which stretched from August 1942 until February 1943, centred on Henderson Field. The airfield was captured by the US on 8 August and placed into operation by 20 August. As long as the airfield was kept operational and stocked with sufficient striking power, the Japanese could not run convoys with heavy equipment and large amounts of supplies to the island. Instead, they were forced to rely on night runs by destroyers which could not carry enough men or supplies to shift the balance decisively against the American garrison on the island. The American air contingent on the island – named the ‘Cactus Air Force’ – comprised Marine, Navy, and Army Air Force units. It had the challenging mission of defending the airfield against constant Japanese attacks, and more importantly, of striking major Japanese attempts to reinforce the island. The mission of neutralising Henderson Field fell primarily to the Imperial Navy’s Air Force flying out of airfields in the Rabaul area. The units charged with this mission were among the most accomplished in the entire Imperial Navy with a high proportion of very experienced pilots and a superb air superiority fighter (the famous ‘Zero’). However, the distance from Rabaul to Guadalcanal handicapped Japanese operations; and their primary bomber was terribly vulnerable to interception. This book traces the air campaign from both sides and explores the factors behind the American victory and the Japanese defeat. The text is supported by full-colour illustrations and contemporary photography.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

Java Sea 1942: Japan’s conquest of the Netherlands East Indies (Campaign 344)
Stille, Mark & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
The battle of the Java Sea, fought in February 1942, was the first major surface engagement of the Pacific War and one of the few naval battles of the entire war fought to a decisive victory. It was the culminating point of the Japanese drive to occupy the Netherlands East Indies (NEI) and, to defend the territory, the Allies assembled a striking force comprised of Dutch, American, British and even an Australian ship, all under the command of a resolute Dutch admiral. On 27 February 1942, the Allied striking force set course to intercept the Japanese invasion force in the Java Sea. In one of the few such times during the whole of World War II, a protracted surface engagement was fought unmolested by airpower. For over seven hours, the Allied force attempted to attack the Japanese invasion force, finally breaking off in the early evening. Some three hours later, the Allied force, now reduced to just four remaining cruisers and two destroyers, attempted another attack on the invasion convoy during which Japanese torpedoes scored heavily, sinking two Dutch cruisers and bringing the battle to a conclusion. Over the next two days, as the Allies attempted to flee, five more ships were sunk. From that point on, Allied naval power was eliminated from Southeast Asia. In this illustrated title, Mark Stille tells the full story of the battle of the Java Sea, explaining how and why the Japanese achieved such a resounding victory, and delving into the tremendous impact of the battle on the course of the Pacific War.
Naval history | PBK | $32.99

German Guided Missiles of World War II: Fritz-X to Wasserfall and X4 (New Vanguard 276)
Zaloga, Steven J & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
Although not as well-known as the V-1 buzz bomb and the V-2 missile, the first German missiles to see combat were anti-ship missiles, the Henschel Hs.293 guided missile and the Fritz-X guided bomb. These began to see extensive combat in the Mediterranean in 1943. In their most famous use, the Italian battleship Roma was sunk by a Fritz-X attack in September 1943 when Italy attempted to switch sides. The serious threat posed by these missiles led to a vigorous but little known ‘Wizard War’ by the Allies to develop electronic counter-measures, the first effort of its kind. Besides the anti-ship missiles, the other major category of German missiles were the air-defence missiles. Germany suffered extremely heavy losses from Allied strategic bombing attacks, and German fighter and flak defences proved increasingly unsuccessful. As a result, the Luftwaffe began an extensive programme to deploy several families of new air defence missiles to counter the bomber threat, including the Wasserfall, Schmetterling, and others. This book traces the origins of these missile programmes and examines their development and use in combat. With full-colour illustrations and detailed explorations of the stories behind the missiles, this study offers a comprehensive overview of German guided missiles in the World War II era.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

 

General non-fiction

How Things Work:
An Illustrated Guide to the Mechanics Behind the World Around Us


Have you ever looked at a car and wondered how it worked? Maybe, an airplane piqued your curiosity; or the arches of a particular building; or, maybe, a piece of technology that you handle daily, such as your phone? Objects, history, places, processes… all fall under the umbrella of ‘thing’. Learn about how these things developed over time and how they impacted the course of human development. From ancient chariots of war, to the telegraph, to the technologies of the future, learn about the mechanics of the world around us. With full-colour cross sections, this new and revised version of How Things Work updates readers on questions of the ever-evolving world around us. More than 100 ‘things’ are dissected so that one can examine the inner workings from milk production to touch screens. The book is broken categorically into ten sections (ancient civilisations, architecture, communication, energy, everyday technology, food industry, machines of war, science, space exploration, transportation), readers are given a complete education on the mechanics of the world around them. Each chapter has eleven subjects that are dissected through diagrams and cross sections with cut away images to show what is really under the surface of each item and process. A thematic index at the end allows one to easily locate all items of interest. The world is a complex and confusing place. How Things Work does it’s best to bring down the confusion, a little bit.
Science | HC | $24.99

The Colour of Time: A New History of the World, 1850–1960
Amaral, Marina & Jones, Dan
The Colour of Time spans more than a hundred years of world history from the reign of Queen Victoria and the US Civil War, to the Cuban Missile Crisis and beginning of the Space Age. It charts the rise and fall of empires, the achievements of science, industry and the arts, the tragedies of war and the politics of peace, and the lives of men and women who made history. The book is a collaboration between a gifted Brazilian artist and a leading British historian. Marina Amaral has created 200 stunning images, using contemporary photographs as the basis for her full-colour digital renditions. Dan Jones has written a narrative that anchors each image in its context, and weaves them into a vivid account of the world that we live in today. A fusion of amazing pictures and well-chosen words, The Colour of Time offers a unique – and often beautiful – perspective on the past.
History/Photography | PBK | $22.99

The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties
Collier, Paul
A world-renowned economist’s candid diagnosis of the failures of capitalism and a pragmatic and realistic vision for how we can repair it. Deep new rifts are tearing apart the fabric of Britain and other Western societies: thriving cities versus the provinces, the highly skilled elite versus the less educated, wealthy versus developing countries. As these divides deepen, we have lost the sense of ethical obligation to others that was crucial to the rise of post-war social democracy. So far, these rifts have been answered only by the revivalist ideologies of populism and socialism, leading to the seismic upheavals of Trump, Brexit, and the return of the far right in Germany. We have heard many critiques of capitalism, but no one has laid out a realistic way to fix it, until now. In a passionate and polemical book, celebrated economist Paul Collier outlines brilliantly original and ethical ways of healing these rifts – economic, social and cultural – with the cool head of pragmatism, rather than the fervour of ideological revivalism. He reveals how he has personally lived across these three divides, moving from working-class Sheffield to hyper-competitive Oxford, and working between Britain and Africa, and acknowledges some of the failings of his profession. Drawing on his own solutions as well as ideas from some of the world’s most distinguished social scientists, he shows us how to save capitalism from itself – and free ourselves from the intellectual baggage of the 20th century.
Economics | PBK | $22.99

A Pocket History of Human Evolution: How We Became Sapiens
Condemi, Silvana & Savatier, François
Why aren’t we more like other apes? How did we win the evolutionary race? Find out how ‘wise’ Homo sapiens really are. Prehistory has never been more exciting: New discoveries are overturning long-held theories, left and right. Stone tools in Australia date back 65,000 years – a time when, we once thought, the first Sapiens had barely left Africa. DNA sequencing has unearthed a new hominid group – the Denisovans – and confirmed that crossbreeding with them (and Neanderthals) made Homo sapiens who we are, today. A Pocket History of Human Evolution brings us up to date on the exploits of all our ancient relatives. Paleoanthropologist Silvana Condemi and science journalist François Savatier consider what accelerated our evolution: Was it tools, our ‘large’ brains, language, empathy, or something else entirely? And why are we the sole survivors among many early bipedal humans? Their conclusions reveal the various ways ancient humans live on, today – from gossip as modern ‘grooming’, to our gendered division of labour – and what the future might hold for our strange and unique species.
Science | PBK | $24.99

Board Games To Create And Play:
Invent Hundreds Of Games About Everything, For Everyone, Everywhere

Davis, Kevan & Schwarz, Viviane
Create the next Snakes and Ladders, Monopoly, Ticket to Ride, or Settlers of Catan with this creative board game book! With over 60 boards to customise, Board Games to Create and Play is a doodle book where every page is an unfinished tabletop game. Just learn the basic concepts, colour and play! Board games are back in vogue – with board games cafés popping up all across the UK, they’re no longer something to play on a rainy day… but a fun and social activity, for every day of the year! In this interactive gaming book, Board Games to Create and Play teaches you how, in just half an hour, you and your friends can come up with a new game and start playing immediately. Just decide on a theme for the game, pick a rule set from the book, agree on some variations, colour in one of many board game designs and gather your die and counters! Completely dippable, and possible to play in any order, this book is packed with tips, tricks and mechanics on how to design the perfect game. With 40 different rule sets, each introducing a new concept, this book encourages you to think outside the box. You can eventually learn how to develop and test your own rules! Whatever the age range or experience of players, the game that you create from this book will always be playable, entertaining and surprising. Each board you create is easy to pull out and completely reusable. If you come up with any new rules, you can write them into the book. So, whether you play video games, mobile games or want to have a go at designing the next classic tabletop, this book is perfect for ages 5–100. (Or anyone who wants to flex their creative muscles!)
Board games | HC | $39.99

It’s All a Game: A Short History of Board Games
Donovan, Tristan
In It’s All A Game, renowned games expert Tristan Donovan opens the box on the incredible and often surprising history and psychology of board games. He traces the evolution of the game across cultures, time periods, and continents, from the paranoid Chicago toy genius behind classics like Operation and Mouse Trap, to the role of Monopoly in helping prisoners of war escape the Nazis, and even the scientific use of board games today to teach artificial intelligence how to reason and how to win. With these compelling stories and characters, Donovan ultimately reveals why board games have captured hearts and minds, all over the world, for generations. ‘Timely… wonderfully entertaining’ – The Wall Street Journal.
Social history | PBK | $22.99

The Journey Matters: Twentieth-Century Travel in True Style
Glancey, Jonathan
What was it really like to take the LNER’s Art Deco Coronation streamliner from King’s Cross to Edinburgh; to cross the Atlantic by the SS Normandie; to fly with Imperial Airways from Southampton to Singapore; to steam from Manhattan to Chicago, on board the New York Central’s 20th Century Limited; or to dine and sleep aboard the Graf Zeppelin? In the course of The Journey Matters, Jonathan Glancey travels from the early 1930s, to the turn of the century; on some of what he considers to be the most truly glamorous and romantic trips he has ever dreamed of, or made in real life. Each of the twenty journeys allows him to explore the history of routes taken, and the events – social and political – enveloping them. Each is the story of the machines that made these journeys possible, of those who shaped them and those, too, who travelled on them.
Social history | HC | $39.99

An Ethical Guidebook to the Zombie Apocalypse:
How to Keep Your Brain without Losing Your Heart

Hall, Bryan
When your base camp is overrun by zombies, whom do you save if you cannot save everyone? Is it permissible to sacrifice one survivor to an undead horde in order to save a greater number of the living? Do you have obligations to loved ones who have turned? These are some of the troubling ethical questions you might face in a zombie apocalypse. Bryan Hall uses situations like these to creatively introduce the foundational theories of moral philosophy. Covering major thinkers such as Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill, this is an introduction to Ethics like no other: a practical guidebook for surviving a zombie outbreak with your humanity intact. It shows you why moral reasoning matters as long as you still walk among the living. The book is written entirely from the perspective of someone struggling to survive in a world overrun by the undead. Each chapter begins with graphic art and a ‘field exercise’ that uses a story from this world to illustrate an ethical problem. By considering moral controversies through the unfamiliar context of a zombie apocalypse, the morally irrelevant factors that get in the way of resolving these controversies are removed and you can better answer questions such as: do we have a moral obligation to help those less fortunate than ourselves?; is it ever morally permissible to intentionally kill an innocent person?; and, are non-rational but sentient beings morally considerable? Equipped with further reading sections and overviews of the theories that you would usually cover in an introductory Ethics course, this one-of-a-kind primer critically evaluates different procedures for moral action that you can use not only to survive but flourish in an undead world.
Moral philosophy | TP | $29.99

A Brief History of Puzzles
Hartston, William
From ancient riddles to modern Sudoku, people have been fascinated by puzzles. Whether they are seen as a glorious waste of time, a harmless way to spend a train journey or a valuable way of exercising the mind, the lure of puzzles has been irresistible. By using over a hundred examples of the most mind-bending, the most challenging, the most satisfying, or simply the most humorous of puzzles, throughout the ages, William Hartston traces the development of brainteasers of all varieties and the increasing ingenuity of puzzle setters from ancient civilisations to modern puzzle crazes.
Puzzle history | HC | $24.99

A Political History of the World: Three Thousand Years of War and Peace
Holslag, Jonathan
A three-thousand-year history of the world that examines the causes of war and the search for peace. In three thousand years of history, China has spent at least eleven centuries at war. The Roman Empire was in conflict during, at least, 50 per cent of its lifetime. Since 1776, the United States has spent over one hundred years at war. The dream of peace has been universal in the history of humanity. So, why have we so rarely been able to achieve it? In A Political History of the World, Jonathan Holslag has produced a sweeping history of the world – from the Iron Age to the present – that investigates the causes of conflict between empires, nations and peoples and the attempts at diplomacy and cosmopolitanism. A birds-eye view of three thousand years of history, the book illuminates the forces shaping world politics from Ancient Egypt to the Han Dynasty, the Pax Romana to the rise of Islam, the Peace of Westphalia to the creation of the United Nations. This truly global approach enables Holslag to search for patterns across different eras and regions, and explore larger questions about war, diplomacy, and power. Has trade fostered peace? What are the limits of diplomacy? How does environmental change affect stability? Is war a universal sin of power? At a time when the threat of nuclear war looms again, this is a much-needed history intended for students of international politics, and anyone looking for a background on current events.
History | PBK | $22.99

Nuking the Moon and Other Intelligence Schemes and Military Plots Best Left on the Drawing Board
Houghton, Vince
Bomb-carrying bats. Poisoned flower arrangements. Cigars laced with mind-altering drugs. Listening devices implanted into specially-trained cats. A torpedo-proof aircraft carrier made out of ice and sawdust. And a CIA plan to detonate a nuclear bomb on the moon… just because. In Nuking the Moon, Vince Houghton, Historian and Curator at the International Spy Museum, collects the most inspired, implausible and downright bizarre military intelligence schemes that never quite made it off the drawing board. From the grandly ambitious to the truly devious, they illuminate a new side of warfare, revealing how a combination of desperation and innovation led not only to daring missions and brilliant technological advances, but to countless plans and experiments that failed spectacularly. Alternatively terrifying and hilarious, and combining archival research with newly-conducted interviews, these twenty-six chapters reveal not only what might have happened, but also what each one tells us about the history and people around it. If ‘military intelligence’ makes you think of James Bond and ingenious exploding gadgets… get ready for the true story.
History | PBK | $24.99

Vox Populi:
Everything You Wanted to Know About the Classical World But Were Afraid to Ask

Jones, Peter
In this compelling tour of the classical world, Peter Jones reveals how it is the power, scope and fascination of their ideas that makes the Ancient Greeks and Romans so important and influential today. For over 2,000 years, these ideas have gripped Western imagination and been instrumental in the way we think about the world. Covering everything from philosophy, history and architecture to language and grammar, Jones uncovers their astonishing intellectual, political, and literary achievements. First published twenty years ago, this fully updated and revised edition is a must-read for anyone who wishes to know more about the classics – and where they came from.
Classics/Ancient history | HC | $27.99

Veni, Vidi, Vici:
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Romans But Were Afraid to Ask

Jones, Peter
The Romans left a long-lasting legacy and their influence can still be seen all around us – from our calendar and coins, to our language and laws – but how much do we really know about them? Help is at hand in the form of Veni, Vidi, Vici, which tells the remarkable, and often surprising, story of the Romans and the most enduring empire in history. Fusing a lively and entertaining narrative with rigorous research, Veni, Vidi, Vici breaks down each major period into a series of concise nuggets that provide a fascinating commentary on every aspect of the Roman world – from plebs to personalities, sauces to sexuality, games to gladiators, poets to punishments, mosaics to medicine, and Catullus to Christianity. Through the twists and turns of his 1250-year itinerary, Jones is a friendly and clear-thinking guide. In this book he has produced a beguiling and entertaining introduction to the Romans, one that vividly brings to life the people who helped create the world we live in today.
Classics/Ancient history | PBK | $22.99

Eureka!
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Ancient Greeks But Were Afraid to Ask

Jones, Peter
The ancient Greeks gave us our alphabet and much of our scientific, medical and cultural language; they invented democracy, atomic theory, and the rules of logic and geometry; laid the foundations of philosophy, history, tragedy and comedy; and debated everything from the good life and the role of women, to making sense of foreigners and the best form of government, all in the most sophisticated terms. But who were they? In Eureka!, Peter Jones tells their epic story – which begins with the Trojan War, and ends with the rise of the Roman Empire – by breaking down each major period into a series of informative nuggets. Along the way, he introduces the major figures of the age, including Homer, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Euclid, and Archimedes; explores the Greek myths and the role of the gods; provides fascinating insights into everyday life in ancient times; and shows us the very foundations of Western culture. Eureka! is both entertaining and illuminating, and will delight anyone who ever wanted to know more about our ancient ancestors.
Classics/Ancient history | PBK | $22.99

It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics
Launay, Mickaël
From Aristotle to Ada Lovelace: a brief history of the mathematical ideas that have forever changed the world, and the everyday people and pioneers behind them. The story of our best invention, yet. From our ability to calculate the passing of time to the algorithms that control computers and much else in our lives, numbers are everywhere. They are so indispensable that we forget how fundamental they are to our way of life. In this international bestseller, Mickaël Launay mixes history and anecdotes from around the world to reveal how mathematics became pivotal to the story of humankind. It is a journey into numbers, with Launay as a guide. In museums, monuments or train stations, he uses the objects around us to explain what art can reveal about geometry, how Babylonian scholars developed one of the first complex written languages, and how ‘Arabic’ numbers were adopted from India. It All Adds Up also tells the story of how mapping the trajectory of an eclipse has helped to trace the precise day of one of the oldest battles in history, how the course of the modern-day Greenwich Meridian was established, and why negative numbers were accepted just last century. This book is a vital compendium of the great men and women of mathematics from Aristotle to Ada Lovelace, which demonstrates how mathematics shaped the written word and the world. With clarity, passion and wisdom, the author unveils the unexpected and at times serendipitous ways in which big mathematical ideas were created. Supporting the belief that – just like music or literature – maths should be accessible to everyone, Launay will inspire a new fondness for the numbers that surround us and the rich stories they contain.
Mathematics/History | PBK | $22.99

The Fifth Risk: Undoing Democracy
Lewis, Michael
The bestselling, no-holds-barred exposé of the people who are wrecking our democracy, by the master storyteller of our times. The morning after Trump was elected president, the people who ran the US Department of Energy – an agency that deals with some of the most powerful risks facing humanity – waited to welcome the incoming administration’s transition team. Nobody appeared. Across the US government, the same thing happened: nothing. People don’t notice, when stuff goes right. That is the stuff government does. It manages everything that underpins our lives from funding free school meals, to policing rogue nuclear activity, to predicting extreme weather events. It steps in where private investment fears to tread, innovates and creates knowledge, assesses extreme long-term risk. And, now, government is under attack. By its own leaders. In The Fifth Risk, Michael Lewis reveals the combustible cocktail of wilful ignorance and venality that is fuelling the destruction of a country’s fabric. All of this, Lewis shows, exposes America and the world to the biggest risk of all. It is what you never learned that might have saved you. Now in paperback.
Democracy | PBK | $22.99

How to Teach Philosophy to Your Dog
McGowan, Anthony
‘We’re doing philosophy now, and that means following the argument wherever it leads, like that time you chased a rabbit and ended up with your head stuck in a hole.’ Monty was just like any other dog. A scruffy and irascible Maltese terrier, he enjoyed barking at pugs, and sniffing at trees. But after yet another dramatic confrontation with the local Rottweiler, Anthony McGowan realises it’s high time he and Monty had a chat about what makes him a good or a bad dog. Taking his lead from Monty’s canine antics, McGowan takes us on a hilarious and enlightening jaunt through the major debates of philosophy. Will Kant convince Monty to stop stealing cheesecake? How long will they put up with Socrates poking holes in every argument? In this uniquely entertaining take on morality and ethics, the dutiful duo set out to uncover who – if anyone – has the right end of the ethical stick and can tell us how best to live one’s life.
Moral philosophy | PBK | $22.99

Living with the Gods: On Beliefs and Peoples
MacGregor, Neil
The panoramic exploration of how belief shapes us, from the celebrated author of A History of the World in 100 Objects. No society on Earth lacks beliefs about where it has come from, its place in the world, and the connection of individuals to the eternal. Until recently, it was widely assumed that religion was on the wane almost everywhere: now, far from becoming marginalised, the relationship between faith and society has moved to the centre of politics and global conversation. Neil MacGregor’s new book traces how different societies have understood and articulated their place in the cosmic scheme. He examines mankind’s beliefs not from the perspective of institutional religions, but by focusing on the shared narratives that have shaped societies – and on what happens when different narratives run up against each other. MacGregor brilliantly turns his kaleidoscope of objects, places and ideas to set these pressing contemporary concerns in the long perspectives of time and place.
Philosophy | PBK | $24.99

How to Speak Machine: Laws of Design for a Digital Age
Maeda, John
Legendary technology and design guru reveals the simple rules that govern the machines of today and tomorrow. John Maeda is one of the world’s preeminent thinkers on technology and design, and in How to Speak Machine, he offers a set of simple laws that govern not only the computers of today, but the unimaginable machines of the future. Machines are already more powerful than we can comprehend, and getting more powerful at an exponential pace. Once set in motion, algorithms never tire. And when a program’s size, speed and endlessness combine with its ability to learn and transform itself, the outcome can be unpredictable and dangerous. Take the seemingly instant transformation of Microsoft’s chatbot into a hate-spewing racist, or how crime-predicting algorithms reinforce racial bias. How to Speak Machine provides a coherent framework for today’s product designers, business leaders and policymakers to grasp this brave new world. Drawing on his wide-ranging experience from engineering to computer science to design, Maeda shows how businesses and individuals can identify opportunities afforded by technology to make world-changing and inclusive products while avoiding the pitfalls inherent to the medium.
Technology | TP | $35.00

The Atlas of Unusual Borders:
Discover Intriguing Boundaries, Territories and Geographical Curiosities

Nikolic, Zoran
This beautifully-designed book presents unusual borders, enclaves and exclaves, divided or non-existent cities and islands. Numerous conflicts have left countries divided and often shattered. Remnants of countries can by design or accident be left behind as a legal anomaly in this complex world. Most people believe that a country’s borders are clearly defined: just lines that separate countries. Everything on one side of the line belongs to one country and everything on the other side belongs to another country. This might be the case most of the time, but there are unusual exceptions to this unwritten rule. Examples include: Campione d’Italia, where Italian residents have to travel 15km through Switzerland to reach the nearest available Italian territory; Tomb of Suleyman Shah, which is a tiny Turkish enclave within Syria which was moved closer to Turkey when Lake Assad was created but still stayed in Syria; Pheasant Island, which for half a year belongs to the Spanish city of Irun, and the remaining half, to its French twin-town, Hendaye; and Canadian Stanstead and American Beebe Plain, where the boundary line runs along the centre of the main street, so that the houses on one side of the street are in Canada and on the other in the United States. These and many more instances are captured in this fascinating book, full of strange geographical intrigue.
Geography | HC | $39.99

Hot Wheels™: From 0 to 50 at 1:64 Scale
Palmer, Kris
Hot Wheels™: From 0 to 50 at 1:64 Scale shares the inspiring journey of the die-cast vehicles that started out as a new twist on toy cars and became a worldwide phenomenon. Officially licensed with Mattel, this in-depth retrospective reveals what makes these cars unique, how the models are designed, and all the work that goes into the play to ensure Hot Wheels™ maintain their position as the greatest toy cars ever made. This special commemorative book is lavishly illustrated with rare design drawings and prototypes from Mattel’s archives, fantastic photos of all of the great Hot Wheels™ vehicles from across their 50-plus-year history, and a feature gatefold illustrated with rare Hot Wheels™ catalogue art. It’s the perfect vehicle for Hot Wheels™ fans of all ages!
Social history | PBK | $35.00

Hidden Planet: An Illustrator’s Love Letter to Planet Earth
Rothery, Ben
A beautiful crossover book for all ages, this is the book natural-history illustrator Ben has wanted to read since he was a child. Simple text will provide an insight into these lesser-known birds and animals – some endangered, and some less so – told from the perspective of a detail-obsessed illustrator. ‘This is my love letter to Planet Earth; a celebration of her hidden species, from the bold and the beautiful to the interesting but ugly. And while not a complete list, I hope that these few give a glimpse of the outstanding diversity of nature’ – Ben Rothery.
Natural history/Art | HC | $39.99

Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
Seife, Charles
This informative and easy-to-read book is the story of the people who battled over the meaning of the mysterious number – the scholars and mystics, the scientists and clergymen – who each tried to understand zero. Within the concept of zero lies a philosophical and scientific history of mankind. The Babylonians invented zero; it was banned by the Greeks; while on the eve of the Millennium, zero was feared to be a time bomb within the world’s computer systems. There was a time when zero did not exist, the concept of zero is a relatively recent Eastern concept and, for centuries, there was a struggle over its very existence. For many cultures, zero represented the void and it could prove to undo the framework of logic. It was seen as an alien concept that could shatter the framework of Christianity and science – yet, European acceptance of zero as a philosophical concept was at the centre of the Renaissance. Over three thousand years, the concept of zero has been at the heart of the intellectual debates that have created our culture. In the first millennium, zero lay at the heart of the debate between Eastern and Western religion; while, after the Renaissance, zero was at the centre of the struggle between religion and science. Zero’s power comes from its ability to disrupt the laws of physics and it may hold the secret of the cosmos. From the nothingness of a vacuum came our universe, if our universe was born in zero so zero could hold the existence of an infinite number of other universes
Science/philosophy | PBK | $24.99

Behind the Lens: My Life
Suchet, David
The long-awaited autobiography of much-loved actor David Suchet. ‘In the early days of my career, I didn’t think I stood a hope in hell. Look at me: I’m short, stocky, slightly overweight, deep of voice, passionate, dark haired, olive skinned, hardly your typical Englishman. What chance did I have, going into the world of British theatre?’ David Suchet has been a stalwart of British stage and screen for fifty years. From Shakespeare to Oscar Wilde, Freud to Poirot, Edward Teller to Doctor Who, Harold Pinter to Terence Rattigan, Questions of Faith to Decline and Fall, right up to 2019’s The Price, David has done it all. Throughout this spectacular career, David has never been without a camera, enabling him to vividly document his life in photographs. Seamlessly combining photo and memoir, Behind the Lens is the story of David’s remarkable life, showcasing his wonderfully evocative photographs and accompanied by his insightful and engaging commentary. In Behind the Lens, David discusses his London upbringing and love of the city, his Jewish roots and how they have influenced his career, the importance of his faith, how he really feels about fame, his love of photography and music, and his processes as an actor. He looks back on his fifty-year career, including reflections on how the industry has changed, his personal highs and lows, and how he wants to be remembered. And, of course, life after Poirot and why he’s still grieving for the eccentric Belgian detective. An autobiography with a difference, this is David Suchet as you’ve never seen him before – from behind the lens.
Autobiography | HC | $55.00

Mr Lear: A Life of Art and Nonsense
Uglow, Jenny
A scrupulously forensic literary appreciation of Edward Lear and his ‘nonsenses’ by one of our most cherished historians – without losing any sense of fun. Edward Lear’s poems follow and break the rules. They abide by the logic of syntax, the linking of rhyme and the dance of rhythm, and these ‘nonsenses’ are full of joy – yet, set against darkness. Where do these human-like animals and birds and these odd adventures – some gentle, some violent, some musical, some wild – come from? His many drawings that accompany his verse are almost hyper-real, as if he wants to free the creatures from the page. They exist nowhere else in literature, springing only from Lear’s imagination. Lear lived all his life on the borders of rules and structures, of disciplines and desires. He vowed to ignore politics yet trembled with passionate sympathies. He depended on patrons and moved in establishment circles; yet, he never belonged among them, and mocked imperial attitudes. He loved men yet dreamed of marriage – but remained, it seems, celibate, wrapped in himself. Even in his family he was marginal, at once accepted and rejected. Surrounded by friends, he was alone. If we follow him across land and sea – to Italy, Greece and Albania, to The Levant and Egypt and India – and to the borderlands of spirit and self, art and desire, can we see, in the end, if the nonsense makes sense? This is what Jenny Uglow has set sail to find out.
Biography | PBK | $29.99

Like A Thief In Broad Daylight: Power in the Era of Post-Humanity
Zizek, Slavoj
The latest analysis from the maverick philosopher on the dark side of technology and power. In recent years, techno-scientific progress has started to utterly transform our world – changing it almost beyond recognition. In this extraordinary new book, renowned philosopher Slavoj Zizek turns to look at the brave new world of Big Tech, revealing how, with each new wave of innovation, we find ourselves moving closer and closer to a bizarrely literal realisation of Marx’s prediction that ‘all that is solid melts into air’. With the automation of work, the virtualisation of money, the dissipation of class communities and the rise of immaterial, intellectual labour, the global capitalist edifice is beginning to crumble, more quickly than ever before – and it is now on the verge of vanishing entirely. But what will come next? Against a backdrop of constant socio-technological upheaval, how could any kind of authentic change take place? In such a context, Zizek argues, there can be no great social triumph – because lasting revolution has already come into the scene, like a thief in broad daylight, stealing into sight right before our very eyes. What we must do now is wake up and see it. Urgent as ever, Like a Thief in Broad Daylight illuminates the new dangers, as well as the radical possibilities, thrown up by today’s technological and scientific advances, and their electrifying implications for us, all.
Politics/Society and culture | PBK | $22.99