Non-Fiction Catalogue: August 2019

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in August 2019.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage (base rate), within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $8.30
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.85
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

USAF F-105 Thunderchief vs VPAF MiG-17: Vietnam 1965–68 (Duel 95)
Davies, Peter E & Laurier, Jim; Hector, Gareth (illustrators)
The F-105D Thunderchief was originally designed as a low-altitude nuclear strike aircraft, but the outbreak of the Vietnam War led to it being used instead as the USAF’s primary conventional striker against the exceptionally well-defended targets in North Vietnam and Laos. F-105 crews conducted long-distance missions from bases in Thailand, refuelling in flight several times and carrying heavy external bombloads. The MiG-17 was the lightweight, highly manoeuvrable defending fighter it encountered most often in 1965–68 during Operation Rolling Thunder. A development of the MiG-15, which shocked UN forces during the Korean War, its emphasis was on simplicity and ease of maintenance in potentially primitive conditions. Fully illustrated with stunning artwork, this book shows how these two aircraft, totally different in design and purpose, fought in a series of duels that cost both sides dearly.
Aviation history | PBK | $32.99

British Airborne Soldier vs Waffen-SS Soldier: Arnhem 1944 (Combat 42)
Greentree, David & Dennis, Peter (illustrator)
Operation Market Garden was an Allied plan to try and end the war before the end of 1944; and relied on landing airborne troops to secure bridges over the Rhine bridges in the Netherlands. Critical to this plan were the glider troops of Britain’s 1st Airlanding Brigade. Short on heavy weapons and not trained in street fighting, the glider troops were meant to secure and defend the Allied perimeter around Arnhem as the parachute brigades fought their way into the city. Facing the airborne forces were under-strength Waffen-SS units that were hastily formed into ad hoc battle groups, some supported by armour. The troops on both sides would have their tactical flexibility and powers of endurance tested to the limit in the bitter actions that ensued. Employing first-hand accounts and drawing upon the latest research, David Greentree tells the story of the glider troops’ dogged defence of the Allied perimeter at Arnhem, and the Waffen-SS forces’ efforts to overcome them.
Military history | PBK | $32.99

Weapons of the US Special Operations Command (Weapon 69)
McNab, Chris & Shumate, Johnny; Gilliland, Alan (illustrators)
The units and formations of the US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) have privileged access to the finest weaponry in the world’s arsenal. Whether Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marines, the SOCOM troops select weapons that match their mission requirements, but which also sit at the cutting edge of combat technology. This means that, while SOCOM troops frequently use standard-issue weaponry, they also adopt many specialist pieces of kit that are not so accessible to the broader armed services, including sniper rifles, battle rifles, and machine guns, as well as high-tech tactical accessories used to transform standard weaponry into something exceptional. Assessing the technology and capabilities of these combat weapons, as well as how they have been used in modern combat, this fully illustrated study lifts the veil on some of the most distinctive hand-held weapon systems of US special operations forces since 1987.
Military history | PBK | $32.99

 

General non-fiction

James Hardy Vaux’s 1819 Dictionary of Criminal Slang and Other Impolite Terms as Used by the Convicts of the British Colonies of Australia with Additional True Stories, Remarkable Facts and Illustrations
Barnard, Simon
In the early 1800s, magistrates in the Australian colonies were often frustrated by the language used by re-offending convicts to disguise their criminal activities and intentions. Convict clerk James Hardy Vaux came up with a useful idea: a dictionary of slang and other terms used by convicts. And so, in 1812, he compiled what was to be Australia’s first published dictionary. With words such as fence (a receiver of stolen goods), flesh-bag (a shirt), flip (to shoot); galloot (a soldier), kid (a child thief), knuckle (to pickpocket), ramp (to rob out in the open), ruffles (handcuffs), screw (a skeleton key), serve (to rob), stamps (shoes) and wrinkle (a lie), Vaux’s dictionary is a fascinating account of convict language, including the origins and early usage of several words that have evolved to become part of Australian English today. And Simon Barnard’s illustrations and supporting accounts of individual convicts and their criminal antics complements this lively picture of Australia’s convict history. James Hardy Vaux was born in 1782, in Surrey, England. He was transported to Australia for seven years for stealing a handkerchief. On the voyage back to London, he was employed writing the King’s log, but after committing further crimes he was transported again to New South Wales. He compiled his dictionary while in the Newcastle Penal Settlement; and, soon after, he received a conditional pardon. There is no record of his death.
Dictionary | HC | $29.99

The World in a Grain: the Story of Sand and How It Transformed Civilisation
Beiser, Vince
Except for water and air, sand is the natural resource that we consume more than any other – more than oil, more than natural gas. Every concrete building and paved road on Earth, every computer screen and silicon chip, exists because of sand. From Egypt’s pyramids to the Hubble telescope, from the world’s tallest skyscraper to the sidewalk below it, from Chartres’ stained-glass windows to Chihuly sculptures to your iPhone, sand shelters us, empowers us, engages us, and inspires us. It’s the ingredient that makes possible our cities, our science, our lives – and our future. And we’re running out of it. The World in a Grain is the compelling true story of the hugely important and diminishing natural resource that grows more important every day, and some of the people who use it, sell it, recycle it, and destroy it. It’s also a provocative examination of the serious human and environmental costs surrounding sand and the profound global significance, which has received little public attention. Award-winning journalist Vince Beiser delves deep into this world, explaining why sand is so crucial to modern life. Along the way, readers encounter sand pirates, become aware of child sand miners, and learn that not all sand is created equal: Some of the easiest sand to get to, is the least useful. The result is an entertaining and eye-opening work, one that is both unexpected and involving, full of fascinating detail and populated by surprising people.
Science | TP | $27.99

The Cryotron Files: the strange death of a pioneering Cold War computer scientist
Buck, Douglas & Dey, Iain
The true-life story of Dudley Buck, an American Cold War hero, whose pioneering work with computer chips placed him firmly in the sights of the KGB. Dudley Buck was a brilliant scientist who developed or invented several early pieces of now-common technology (eg, microchips, flash drives) in the 1950s. Like his Nobel-winning colleagues, he might have benefited from them greatly, had he not died aged 32 of a mysterious heart attack, just after a high-profile group of Soviet scientists visited his lab on a cold war-era tour of the USA. Buck was not the only scientist to expire that day – his colleague Dr Ridenour, chief scientist at Lockheed, also died of an unexplained heart attack. Both deaths are consistent with KGB contact-poison hits. Recently-discovered papers reveal Buck’s extensive career in clandestine government work that had led to his contact with Russia’s top computer scientists. His work was filed away; and rediscovered in the 1980s, when it was used in research projects by NASA. A fascinating narrative history of Cold War era computer and tech research, combining social historical elements to produce a brilliant portrait of America in the mid-20th century.
History/Science | PBK | $22.99

The Art of Logic: How to Make Sense in a World that Doesn’t
Cheng, Eugenia
For thousands of years, mathematicians have used the timeless art of logic to see the world more clearly. In The Art of Logic, Royal Society Science Book Prize nominee Eugenia Cheng shows how anyone can think like a mathematician – and see, argue and think better. Learn how to simplify complex decisions without over-simplifying them. Discover the power of analogies and the dangers of false equivalences. Find out how people construct misleading arguments, and how we can argue back. Eugenia Cheng teaches us how to find clarity without losing nuance, taking a careful scalpel to the complexities of politics, privilege, sexism and dozens of other real-world situations. Her Art of Logic is a practical and inspiring guide to decoding the modern world.
Mathematics/Philosophy | PBK | $22.99

Beyond Infinity: an expedition to the outer limits of the mathematical universe
Cheng, Eugenia
Even small children know there are infinitely many whole numbers – start counting and you’ll never reach the end. But there are also infinitely many decimal numbers between zero and one. Are these two types of infinity the same? Are they larger or smaller than each other? Can we even talk about ‘larger’ and ‘smaller’ when we talk about infinity? In Beyond Infinity, international maths sensation Eugenia Cheng reveals the inner workings of infinity. What happens when a new guest arrives at your infinite hotel – but you already have an infinite number of guests? How does infinity give Zeno’s tortoise the edge in a paradoxical foot-race, with Achilles? And can we really make an infinite number of cookies from a finite amount of cookie dough? Wielding an armoury of inventive, intuitive metaphor, Cheng draws beginners and enthusiasts alike into the heart of this mysterious, powerful concept to reveal fundamental truths about mathematics, all the way from the infinitely large down to the infinitely small.
Mathematics/Science | PBK | $22.99

How to Bake Pi: Easy recipes for understanding complex maths
Cheng, Eugenia
What is maths all about? And what on earth do cake and custard have to do with it? The fabulous Eugenia Cheng’s entertaining guide to mathematical thinking… Moebius bagels, Euclid’s flourless chocolate cake and apple pi – this is maths, but not as you know it. In How to Bake Pi, mathematical crusader and star baker Eugenia Cheng has rustled up a batch of delicious culinary insights into everything from simple numeracy to category theory (‘the mathematics of mathematics’), via Fermat, Poincare and Riemann. Maths is much more than simultaneous equations and pr2: it is an incredibly powerful tool for thinking about the world around us. And once you learn how to think mathematically, you’ll never think about anything – cakes, custard, bagels or doughnuts; not to mention fruit crumble, kitchen clutter and Yorkshire puddings – the same way again. Stuffed with moreish puzzles and topped with a generous dusting of wit and charm, How to Bake Pi is a foolproof recipe for a mathematical feast.
Mathematics/Science | PBK | $22.99

Trinity: the Treachery and Pursuit of the Most Dangerous Spy in History
Close, Frank
A thrilling new history of the most damaging nuclear spy ever to undermine the West, by an important scientific practitioner. Klaus Fuchs knew more nuclear secrets in the last two years of the Second World War than anyone else in Britain. He was taken onto the Manhattan Project in the USA as a trusted physicist – and was the conduit by which knowledge of the highest classification passed to the Soviet Union. When Truman announced at the Potsdam Conference that the US possessed a nuclear bomb, Stalin already knew. This book, by an accomplished scientist as well as historian, is the first to explain the physics as well as the spying, and because Frank Close worked, like Fuchs, at the Harwell Laboratory, it contains much important new material.
History | HC | $55.00

Talking to Robots: a Brief Guide to Our Human-Robot Futures
Duncan, David Ewing
Award-winning journalist David Ewing Duncan considers twenty-four visions of possible human-robot futures – incredible scenarios from Teddy Bots to Warrior Bots, and Politician Bots to Sex Bots – grounded in real technologies and possibilities and inspired by our imagination.
Science/Society and culture | TP | $32.99

21 Lessons for the 21st Century
Harari, Yuval Noah
Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present. How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children? Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues. The golden thread running through his exhilarating new book is the challenge of maintaining our collective and individual focus in the face of constant and disorienting change. Are we still capable of understanding the world we have created? Now in paperback.
Society and culture/science/philosophy | TP | $35.00

Fundamental: How quantum and particle physics explain absolutely everything (except gravity)
James, Tim
At the start of the twentieth century, science appeared complete and the laws of nature were almost all discovered, but then we woke a sleeping giant – we discovered quantum mechanics. In the quantum realm, objects can be in two places at once. It’s a place where time travel is not only possible, but necessary. It’s a place where cause and effect can happen in reverse and observing something changes its state. From parallel universes to antimatter, quantum mechanics has revealed that when you get right down to it, the laws of nature are insane. The scientist J B S Haldane once said, ‘Reality is not only stranger than we imagine… it’s stranger than we can imagine.’ Never is this more true than with quantum mechanics; our best, most recent attempt to make sense of the fundamental laws of nature. Fundamental is a comprehensive beginner’s guide to quantum mechanics, explaining not only the weirdness of the subject but the experiments that proved it to be true. Using a humorous and light-hearted approach, Fundamental tells the story of how the most brilliant minds in science grappled with seemingly impossible ideas and gave us everything from microchips to particle accelerators. Fundamental gives clear explanations of all the quantum phenomena known to modern science, without requiring an understanding of complex mathematics; tells the eccentric stories of the scientists who made these shattering discoveries and what they used them for; explains how quantum field theory (a topic not covered in detail by any other popular-science book) gave rise to particle physics and why the Higgs boson isn’t the end of the story.
Science | TP | $32.99

The Bastard Brigade: the True Story of the Renegade Scientists and Spies
Who Sabotaged the Nazi Atomic Bomb

Kean, Sam
Scientists have always kept secrets. But rarely in history have scientific secrets been as vital as they were during World War II. In the midst of planning the Manhattan Project, the US Office of Strategic Services created a secret offshoot – the Alsos Mission – meant to gather intelligence on and sabotage if necessary, scientific research by the Axis powers. What resulted was a plot worthy of the finest thriller, full of spies, sabotage, and murder. At its heart was the ‘Lightning A’ team, a group of intrepid soldiers, scientists, and spies – and even a famed baseball player – who were given almost free rein to get themselves embedded within the German scientific community to stop the most terrifying threat of the war: Hitler acquiring an atomic bomb of his very own. While the Manhattan Project and other feats of scientific genius continue to inspire us today, few people know about the international intrigue and double dealing that accompanied those breakthroughs. Bastard Brigade recounts this forgotten history, fusing a non-fiction spy thriller with some of the most incredible scientific ventures of all time.
Military history/Science | TP | $32.99

Money for Nothing:
the South Sea Bubble and the Invention of Modern Capitalism

Levenson, Thomas
A narrative of early capitalism’s most famous scandal, a speculative frenzy that nearly bankrupted the British state during the hot summer of 1720 – and paradoxically led to the birth of modern finance. The South Sea Company was formed to trade with Asian and Latin American countries. But it had almost no ships and did precious little trade. Instead it got into financial fraud on a massive scale, taking over the government’s debt and promising to pay the state out of the money received from the shares it sold. And how they sold. In the summer of 1720, the share price rocketed, and everyone was making money. Until the carousel stopped, and thousands lost their shirts. Isaac Newton, Alexander Pope and others lost heavily. Tom Levenson’s superb account of the South Sea bubble is not just the story of a huge scam, but is also the story of the birth of modern financial capitalism: the idea that you can invest in future prosperity and that governments can borrow money to make things happen, like funding the rise of British naval and mercantile power. These dreamers and fraudsters may have bankrupted Britain, but they made the world rich.
History/Economics | HC | $49.99

Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World
Menn, Joseph
The fast-paced, riveting story of the hacking collective that is using technology as a force for good, and fighting back against corporations and countries that are going after our freedom, privacy, even our democracy. The Cult of the Dead Cow is the story of the oldest, most respected and most famous hacking group of all time. Its members invented the concept of hacktivism, released both the top tool for cracking passwords and the reigning technique for controlling computers from afar, and spurred development of Snowden’s anonymity tool of choice. With its origins in the earliest days of the Internet, the cDc is full of oddball characters – spies, activists, musicians, and politicians – who are now woven into the top ranks of the American establishment. Today, this small group and their followers represent the best hope for making technology a force for good, instead of for surveillance and oppression. Like a modern (and real) illuminati, cDc members have had the ears of presidents, secretaries of defence, and the CEO of Google. The Cult of the Dead Cow shows how we got into the mess we find ourselves in, today – where governments and corporations hold immense power over individuals – and how we are finally fighting back.
Technology | PBK | $24.99

The Regency Revolution
Morrison, Robert
The fascinating story of the Regency period in Britain – an immensely colourful and chaotic decade that marked the emergence of the modern world. The Regency began on 5 February 1811, when the Prince of Wales replaced his violently insane father George III as the sovereign de facto. It ended on 29 January 1820, when George III died and the Prince Regent became King, as George IV. At the centre of the era is, of course, the Regent himself, who was vilified by the masses for his selfishness and corpulence. Around him surged a society defined by brilliant characters, momentous events, and stark contrasts; a society forced to confront a whole range of pressing new issues that signalled a decisive break from the past and that for the first time brought our modern world clearly into view. The Regency Revolution is the most thorough and vivid exploration of the period ever published, and it reveals the remarkably diverse ways in which the cultural, social, technological and political revolutions of this decade continue both to inspire and haunt our world.
History | HC | $39.99

Pen in Hand: Reading, Rereading and other Mysteries
Parks, Tim
How can other people like the books we don’t like? What benefit can we get from rereading a work? Can we read better? If so, how? These and many other questions, ranging from the field of writing to that of reading and translation, are given a comprehensive answer in a series of stimulating and challenging literary essays that will be a perfect read for all book explorers and practitioners of the pen. After delighting us with his novels and many volumes of non-fiction, Tim Parks – who is not only an acclaimed author and a translator, but also a celebrated literary essayist – gives us a book to enjoy, savour and, most importantly, reread.
Reading | HC | $29.99

The Book of Why: the New Science of Cause and Effect
Pearl, Judea & Mackenzie, Dana
‘Correlation does not imply causation.’ This mantra was invoked by scientists for decades in order to avoid taking positions as to whether one thing caused another, such as smoking and cancer and carbon dioxide and global warming. But, today, that taboo is dead. The causal revolution, sparked by world-renowned computer scientist Judea Pearl and his colleagues, has cut through a century of confusion and placed cause and effect on a firm scientific basis. Now, Pearl and science journalist Dana Mackenzie explain causal thinking to general readers for the first time, showing how it allows us to explore the world that is and the worlds that could have been. It is the essence of human and artificial intelligence. And just as Pearl’s discoveries have enabled machines to think better, The Book of Why explains how we can think better.
Philosophy/Cognitive science | PBK | $24.99

Truth: a Brief History of Total Bullsh*t
Phillips, Tom
This is a book about Truth – and all the ingenious ways, throughout history, that we’ve managed to avoid it. We live in a ‘post-truth’ age, we’re told. The US has a president who openly lies on a daily basis (or who doesn’t even know what’s true, and doesn’t care). The internet has turned our everyday lives into a misinformation battleground. People don’t trust experts, any more. But was there ever really a golden age of truth-telling? As the editor of the UK’s leading independent fact-checker, Tom Phillips deals with complete bollocks every day. Here, he tells the story of how we humans have spent history lying to each other – and ourselves – and asks an important question: how can humanity move towards a truthier future? ‘Tom Phillips is a very clever, very funny man’ – Greg Jenner.
History | TP | $32.99

Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are
Plomin, Robert
One of the world’s top behavioural geneticists argues that we need a radical rethink about what makes us who we are. The blueprint for our individuality lies in the one per cent of DNA that differs between people. Our intellectual capacity, our introversion or extraversion, our vulnerability to mental illness, even whether we are a morning person – all of these aspects of our personality are profoundly shaped by our inherited DNA differences. In Blueprint, Robert Plomin, a pioneer in the field of behavioural genetics, draws on a lifetime’s worth of research to make the case that DNA is the most important factor shaping who we are. Our families, schools and the environment around us are important, but they are not as influential as our genes. This is why, he argues, teachers and parents should accept children for who they are, rather than trying to mould them in certain directions. Even the environments we choose and the signal events that impact our lives, from divorce to addiction, are influenced by our genetic predispositions. Now, thanks to the DNA revolution, it is becoming possible to predict who we will become, at birth, from our DNA alone. As Plomin shows us, these developments have sweeping implications for how we think about parenting, education, and social mobility. A game-changing book by a leader in the field, Blueprint shows how the DNA present in the single cell, with which we all begin our lives, can impact our behaviour as adults.
Science | PBK | $22.99

Fierce Bad Rabbits: the Tales Behind Children’s Picture Books
Pollard, Clare
A nostalgic and eye-opening journey through our best-loved picture books, from Peter Rabbit to The Gruffalo. What is The Tiger Who Came to Tea really about? What has Meg and Mog to do with Polish embroidery? Why is death in picture books so often represented by being eaten? Fierce Bad Rabbits takes us on an eye-opening journey on a pea-green boat through the history of picture books. From Edward Lear through to Julia Donaldson, Clare Pollard shines a light on some of our best-loved childhood stories and what they really mean, weaving in tales from her own childhood and her re-readings as a parent. Because the best picture books are far more complex than they seem – and darker too. Monsters can gobble up children and go unnoticed, power is not always used wisely, and the wild things are closer than you think. Sparkling with wit, magic and nostalgia, Fierce Bad Rabbits will make you see even stories you’ve read, a hundred times, afresh.
Reading/Publishing | HC | $32.99

The Basis of Everything: Rutherford, Oliphant and the Coming of the Atomic Bomb
Ramsey, Andrew
Before the Manhattan Project, before nuclear warfare and the horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was the twentieth century’s great scientific quest to fathom the secrets of the atom. It was through that search for the inner workings of matter that a unique friendship was forged, a partnership that defied academic orthodoxy and altered the course of history. Centred on the interwar years – within the ivy clad walls of Cambridge University’s famed Cavendish Laboratory, amid the windswept valleys of north Wales, and in the industrial heartland of Birmingham – The Basis of Everything is the story of the coming of the atomic bomb, and how the unlikely union of two scientists – Ernest Rutherford, the son of a New Zealand farmer, and Mark Oliphant, a peace-loving vegetarian from a tiny Australian hills village – would change the world. The story that bonds Ernest Rutherford and Mark Oliphant is as extraordinary as it is unlikely. They were kindred souls, schooled and steeped in the furthest frontiers of Britain’s empire, whose restless intellect and tireless conviction fused in the crucible of discovery at Cambridge University’s celebrated Cavendish Laboratory, at a time when nature’s deepest secrets were being revealed. Their brilliance illuminated the sub-atomic recesses of the natural world and, as a direct result, set loose the power of nuclear fusion. It was a heartfelt, enduring partnership, born at the University of Adelaide’s modest physics department and then flourishing further in the confines of the Cavendish; before ultimately driving the famed Manhattan Project, which produced the world’s first nuclear weapons, unleashed to such devastating effect on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Rutherford and Oliphant were men with a shared devotion to pure science, who, through circumstance and necessity, found themselves betrayed as instruments of wars they detested, but were duty bound to prosecute. Consequently, their influence was pivotal in the last great global conflict the world witnessed and in engendering the thermonuclear threat that has held the planet hostage ever since. Yet, their pioneering work also lives on in a vast array of innovations seeded by nuclear physics, from radiocarbon dating and TV screens to life-saving diagnostic-imaging devices.
History/Science | HC | $39.99

The Hidden Army – MI9’s Secret Force and the Untold Story of D-Day
Richards, Matt
Almost seventy-five years ago, MI9 dreamt up the most audacious escape and evasion plan of World War Two. Formulated by Airey Neave, one of the first men ever to escape from Colditz, this plan was one of subterfuge, concealment and deception on a scale never seen before. With numerous downed RAF and Allied pilots on the run in Europe, and with the fabled Comete Escape Line having been infiltrated by double agents, Neave’s plan was to hide these men right under the very noses of the Nazis rather than risk repatriation. Choosing a forest in the heart of France, right next to one of the German Army’s largest ammunition bases, Neave, Belgian agents and the French Resistance would secretly transport and hide Allied pilots and soldiers within feet of the enemy. Nobody thought it would work, but such was the success of the secret camp that a whole community of over one hundred and fifty Allied escapers lived within the forest for three months in the run up to D-Day. Despite numerous close shaves, they were never discovered and this outrageous plan, brilliant in its simplicity, saw the Allied evaders make their home in the forest, cooking and hunting to survive – and even setting up a golf course in the forest using branches for clubs – without discovery. This operation remained absolutely secret, to the point that the inhabitants of the villages surrounding the forest were unaware, until the end, of the existence of that allied force so close to them. Told through interviews with evaders, members of the Resistance and the children charged with smuggling food into the forest, this book tells the compelling story of one of the most audacious operations in World War Two. A story that has, until today, remained as secret as the Hidden Army of Freteval.
Military/espionage history | PBK | $19.99

Constellations: the Story of Space Told Through the 88 Known Star Patterns in the Night Sky
Schilling, Govert & Tirion, Wil
Perfect for stargazers and armchair astronomers of all ages, Constellations is a beautifully-illustrated, fascinating guide to all 88 constellations, including an illustrated star map for each. Much more than just a stargazer’s guide, Constellations is complete history of astronomy, as told by Schilling – through the lens of each constellation. The book is organised alphabetically by constellation. Profiles of each constellation include basic information such as size, visibility, and number of stars, as well as information on the discovery and naming of the constellation and associated lore. Beyond details about the constellation itself is information about every astronomical event that took place or discovery made in the vicinity of the constellation. In the constellation of Cygnus (the Swan) we encounter the location of the first confirmed black hole. A stop at Gemini (the Twins) is a chance to say hello to the dwarf planet Pluto, and in Orion (the hunter) we find the location of the first identified gamma-ray burst. Stunning star maps, throughout the book, by acclaimed star mapmaker Wil Tirion show us the exact location of every constellation, the details of its structure, as well as its surrounding astronomical neighbours.
Science | HC | $45.00

Einstein’s Fridge: the Science of Fire, Ice and the Universe
Sen, Paul
Einstein’s Fridge tells the story of how scientists uncovered the least known and yet most consequential of all the sciences, and learned to harness the power of heat and ice. The laws of thermodynamics govern everything from the behaviour of atoms to that of living cells, from the engines that power our world to the black hole at the centre of our galaxy. Not only that, but thermodynamics explains why we must eat and breathe, how the lights come on, and ultimately how the universe will end. The people who decoded its laws came from every branch of the sciences – they were engineers, physicists, chemists, biologists, cosmologists and mathematicians. Their discoveries, set over two hundred years, kick-started the industrial revolution, changed the course of world wars and informed modern understanding of black holes. This book captures the thrill of discovery and the power of revolutionary science to change the world forever. A compulsively readable account of the extraordinary people, battling internal demons and external adversaries, who discovered the laws of thermodynamics and the science of heat, and brought about a scientific revolution.
Science/History | TP | $32.99

Hitler’s British Traitors: the Secret History of Spies, Saboteurs and Fifth Columnists
Tate, Tim
Hitler’s British Traitors is the first authoritative account of a well-kept secret: the British Fifth Column and its activities during the Second World War. Drawing on hundreds of declassified official files – many of them previously unpublished – Tim Tate uncovers the largely unknown history of more than 70 British traitors; who were convicted, mostly in secret trials, of working to help Nazi Germany win the war, and several hundred British Fascists who were interned without trial on evidence that they were working on behalf of the enemy. Four were condemned to death; two were executed. This engrossing book reveals the extraordinary methods adopted by MI5 to uncover British traitors and their German spymasters, as well as two serious wartime plots by well-connected British fascists to mount a coup d’etat which would replace the government with an authoritarian pro-Nazi regime. The book also shows how archaic attitudes to social status and gender in Whitehall and the courts ensured that justice was neither fair nor equitable. Aristocratic British pro-Nazi sympathisers and collaborators were frequently protected while the less-privileged foot soldiers of the Fifth Column were interned, jailed, or even executed for identical crimes.
Military/espionage history | HC | $39.99

Turning Point: the Battle for Milne Bay 1942 – Japan’s first land defeat in World War II
Veitch, Michael
Told for the first time, this is the epic story of the Milne Bay campaign of 1942 – which saw Japanese land forces suffer their first defeat of the war – and has properly been called the RAAF’s forgotten finest hour. The Battle for Milne Bay – Japan’s first defeat on land in the Second World War – was a defining moment in the evolution of the indomitable Australian fighting spirit. For the men of the AIF, the militia and the RAAF, it was the turning point in the Pacific, and their finest – though now largely forgotten – hour. Forgotten, until now. In August 1942, Japan’s forces were unstoppable. Having conquered vast swathes of south-east Asia – Malaya, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies – and now invading New Guinea, many feared the Empire of the Rising Sun stood poised to knock down Australia’s northern door. But, first, they needed Port Moresby. In the still of an August night, Japanese marines sailed quietly into Milne Bay, a long, malaria-ridden dead end at the far eastern tip of Papua, to unleash an audacious pincer movement. Unbeknown to them, however, a secret airstrip had been carved out of a coconut plantation by US Engineers, and a garrison of Australian troops had been established, supported by two locally based squadrons of RAAF Kittyhawks, including the men of the famed 75 Squadron. The scene was set for one of the most decisive and vicious battles of the war. For ten days and nights Australia’s soldiers and airmen fought the elite of Japan’s forces along a sodden jungle track, and forced them back step by muddy, bloody step.
Military history | TP | $32.99

Semicolon: How a Misunderstood Punctuation Mark Can Improve Your Writing,
Enrich Your Reading and even Change Your Life

Watson, Cecelia
A biography of a much-misunderstood punctuation mark and a call to arms in favour of clear expression and against stifling grammar rules. Cecelia Watson used to be obsessive about grammar rules. But then she began teaching. And that was when she realised that strict rules aren’t always the best way of teaching people how to make words say what they want them to; that they are even, sometimes, best ignored. One punctuation mark encapsulates this thorny issue more clearly than any other. The semicolon. Hated by Stephen King, Hemingway, Vonnegut and Orwell, and loved by Herman Melville, Henry James and Rebecca Solnit, it is the most divisive punctuation mark in the English language, and many are too scared to go near it. But why? When is it effective? Have we been misusing it? Should we even care? In this warm, funny, enlightening and thoroughly original book, Cecelia Watson takes us on a whistle-stop tour of the surprising history of the semicolon and explores the remarkable power it can wield, if only we would stop being afraid of it. Forget the rules; you’re in charge. It’s time to make language do what you want it to.
Language | HC | $19.99

Black Gold: the Dark History of Coffee
Wild, Antony
It may seem like just a drink, but coffee’s dark journey from the highlands of Ethiopia to the high streets of every town in the country links alchemy and anthropology, poetry and politics, science, and slavery. Plots have been hatched, blood spilled, and governments toppled to keep your mug filled with fresh espresso. In this thought-provoking exposé, Antony Wild, coffee trader and historian, explores coffee’s dismal colonial past, its perilous corporate present, and the environmental destruction which could limit its future, revealing the shocking exploitation at the heart of the industry.
History | PBK | $22.99

The Romans (Histories of the Unexpected)
Willis, Sam & Daybell, James
Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us, as never before. Traditionally, the Romans have been understood in a straightforward way, but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, emperors, the development of civilisation and armies all have a fascinating history… but so too do tattoos, collecting, fattening, recycling, walking, poison, fish, inkwells, and wicked stepmothers! Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
History | HC | $19.99

The Second World War (Histories of the Unexpected)
Willis, Sam & Daybell, James
Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us, as never before. Traditionally, World War II has been understood in a straightforward way, but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, battles, bombs and bravery all have a fascinating history… but so too do handkerchiefs, furniture, Mozart, insects, blood, mothers, suicide, darkness, cancer, and puppets! Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
History | HC | $19.99

The Tudors (Histories of the Unexpected)
Willis, Sam & Daybell, James
Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us, as never before. Traditionally, the Tudors have been understood in a straightforward way, but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, Tudor monarchs, exploration and religion have a fascinating history… but so too does cannibalism, shrinking, bells, hats, mirrors, monsters, faces, letter writing, and accidents! Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
History | HC | $19.99

The Vikings (Histories of the Unexpected)
Willis, Sam & Daybell, James
Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us, as never before. Traditionally, the Vikings have been understood in a straightforward way – but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, ships, raiding and trade have a fascinating history… but so too do hair, break ins, toys, teeth, mischief, luck, and silk! Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
History | HC | $19.99