Non-Fiction Catalogue: August 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in August 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

P-39/P-400 Airacobra vs A6M2/3 Zero-sen: New Guinea 1942 (Duel 87)
Claringbould, Michael John & Laurier, Jim; Hector, Gareth (illustrators)
After the huge advances made in the early months of the Pacific war, it was in remote New Guinea, where the advance of Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force (IJNAF) A6M Zero-sen fighters was first halted due to a series of offensive and defensive aerial battles ranging from treetop height up to 30,000 ft. Initially, the IJNAF fought Australian Kittyhawks, but by May 1942 they had fought themselves into oblivion, and were relieved by USAAF P-39 and P-400 Airacobras. The battles unfolded over mountainous terrain with treacherous tropical weather. Neither IJNAF nor USAAF pilots had been trained for such extreme conditions, incurring many additional losses, aside from those that fell in combat. Using specially-commissioned artwork and contemporary photographs and testimony, this fascinating study explains how, despite their initial deficit in experience and equipment, the Airacobras managed to square the ledger and defend New Guinea.
Military/aviation history | PBK | $24.99

Heinkel He 177 Units of World War 2 (Combat Aircraft 123)
Forsyth, Robert & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
In many ways, the Heinkel He 177 ‘Greif’ (Griffon) was Nazi Germany’s ‘lost’ strategic bomber. With some fundamental creases ironed out, and built in large numbers, the He 177 would have offered the Luftwaffe the means with which to carry out long-range, mass bombing attacks against targets of a strategic nature. Although competing interests and personalities served to prevent this from happening; from mid-1943, the aircraft nevertheless saw service over England, the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and in Russia. The He 177 flew to the end of the war, with some machines undertaking extremely hazardous low-level missions against Soviet armour in Poland, in late 1944–45. This fascinating book, filled with detailed artwork and contemporary photographs, tells the story of this aircraft, including the political infighting at the top of the Luftwaffe’s hierarchy that stymied its development, its radical technical design, and its state-of-the-art weaponry.
Military/aviation history | PBK | $27.99

The British Home Guard Pocketbook (general military)
Green, A F U
The Home Guards are an attacking force ‘lying in wait for, and ready to destroy, and enemy who dares to set foot on our shores’. The Home Guard has been immortalised in British culture, in the TV series Dad’s Army. Formed by men not eligible for active service – too old, too young, in reserved occupations vital to the war effort – who were expected to resist a German invasion with any resources they had to hand, the Home Guard is the embodiment of plucky British resolve against the odds. The Home Guard Pocket-Book evokes this spirit. Written by Brig-Gen Green, commanding 4th battalion, Sussex Home Guard and Training Adviser for the Sussex Zone, this book is based on his experience and, in his own words, ‘is the result of my ransacking the dusty pigeon-holes of memory and the condensation of many books, official instructions and writings’. Its tone is informal and colloquial, such as: ‘March discipline. Troops will always march off the parade ground at the Slope. As soon as this has been done the order ‘March at Ease’ should be given. When marching at ease the rifle may be carried in any way a soldier fancies.’ Nevertheless, the book is full of sound advice on training, organisation and discipline, fire arms, reconnaissance and field engineering, the responsibilities of the Group Pigeon Officer, the proper position to adopt for surviving a dive bomb attack, and how to set a trap for an unwary advancing German cyclist!
Military history | HC | $19.99

Hitlerjugend Soldier vs Canadian Soldier: Normandy 1944 (Combat 34)
Greentree, David & Shumate, Johnny (illustrator)
Canadian and Waffen-SS troops of 12 SS-Panzer-Division Hitlerjugend faced one another in a series of bloody battles following the D-Day landings of June 1944. The Canadian units fought in a number of distinguished regiments, while the Hitlerjugend Division were drawn from the ranks of the Hitler Youth organisations. Veteran officers and NCOs were joined by inexperienced teenagers, and clashed with the Canadians repeatedly, notably at Authie, Bretteville and Hill 168. The struggle quickly took on an especially bitter nature, fuelled by the massacre of Canadian prisoners, by Hitlerjugend personnel. Employing first-hand accounts and the latest research, as well as specially-commissioned artwork and carefully selected archive photographs this absorbing study investigates the origins, ethos, training and fighting techniques, and weapons of both sides – during the epic struggle for Normandy.
Military history | PBK | $27.99

Soviet Cruise Missile Submarines of the Cold War (New Vanguard 260)
Hampshire, Edward & Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
The Soviet Union’s cruise missile submarines from the modified Whiskey, to the Oscar II classes were among the most formidable vessels of the Cold War. They were initially designed to carry land attack nuclear-tipped cruise missiles designed to strike targets on the eastern coast of the United States. By the late 1960s, however, submarine-launched ballistic missiles made the nuclear land-attack mission unnecessary, so existing classes were converted to the ‘carrier killer’ role, armed with anti-ship cruise missiles designed to destroy US super-carriers, and other important naval targets. This fully-illustrated study examines these powerful machines that were some of the largest and fastest submarines ever built. If war had broken out, they would have been at the forefront of the Soviet Navy’s campaign to destroy NATO’s sea power and cut America’s sea link with Europe.
Military/naval history | PBK | $22.99

World War II US Marine Infantry Regiments (Elite 222)
Rottman, Gordon L & Dennis, Peter (illustrator)
The United States Marine Corps came into its own in the Pacific Islands campaign against Japan in World War II. From Guadalcanal to Okinawa, US Marines formed the tip of the spear, as Allied forces sought to push the Japanese back to their Home Islands. This fascinating study tracks the deployments of the various Marine divisions throughout the war and explains their composition, but also goes deeper, to detail the individual regiments – the focus of the marines’ identity and pride. It explains the organisation of the Marine infantry regiment and its equipment, and how they evolved during the war. The marine infantryman’s evolving uniforms, field equipment and weapons are illustrated throughout using specially commissioned artwork and detailed descriptions to produce a fitting portrait of the US military’s elite fighting force in the Pacific.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

Operation Crossbow 1944: Hunting Hitler’s V-Weapons (Air Campaign 5)
Zaloga, Steven J & Turner, Graham (illustrator)
In mid-1943, Allied intelligence began to pick up the signs of unusual German construction in remote locations near the Channel Coast. Several massive fortifications were beginning to take shape, and they appeared to be oriented towards London. Allied intelligence codenamed these sites as ‘Crossbow’ and began plans to attack them, before they could bombard Britain’s capital city. These ‘Heavy Crossbow’ sites for the V-1 and V-2 missiles were supposed to be bomb-proof, but they soon attracted the attention of RAF heavy bombers with the new Tallboy concrete-penetrating bombs. Fully illustrated with commissioned artwork and contemporary photographs, Operation Crossbow 1944 examines the dynamics of the world’s first missile war. It also describes the parallel American efforts to develop missiles and assault drones to attack the ‘Heavy Crossbow’ sites, including the Air Force’s Aphrodite and Navy Anvil projects.
Military history | PBK | $26.99

 

General non-fiction

Battles That Changed History

From the fury of the Punic Wars to the icy waters of Dunkirk, relive 5,000 years of world-changing combat with this guide to the most famous battles in history, including a foreword from TV presenter and historian Tony Robinson. This military history book takes you on a journey through the battlefields of history, from the ancient world to the American Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and beyond. Maps, paintings, and photographs reveal the stories behind more than 90 of the most important battles ever to take place, and show how fateful decisions led to glorious victories and crushing defeats. From medieval battles and great naval battles to the era of high-tech air battles, key campaigns are illustrated and analysed in detail – the weapons, the soldiers, and the military strategy. Famous military leaders are profiled, including Alexander the Great, Napoleon, and Rommel, and crucial arms, armour, and equipment are explained. Whether at Marathon, Agincourt, Gettysburg, or Stalingrad, Battles that Changed History takes you into the thick of combat and shows how kingdoms and empires have been won and lost on the battlefield.
History | HC | $39.99

The World in a Grain: The Story of Sand and How It Transformed Civilisation
Beiser, Vince
Except for water and air, sand is the natural resource that we consume more than any other-more than oil, more than natural gas. Every concrete building and paved road on Earth, every computer screen and silicon chip, exists because of sand. From Egypt’s pyramids to the Hubble telescope, from the world’s tallest skyscraper to the sidewalk below it, from Chartres’ stained-glass windows to Chihuly sculptures to your iPhone, sand shelters us, empowers us, engages us, and inspires us. It’s the ingredient that makes possible our cities, our science, our lives-and our future. And we’re running out of it. The World in a Grain is the compelling true story of the hugely important and diminishing natural resource that grows more important every day, and some of the people who use it, sell it, recycle it, and destroy it. It’s also a provocative examination of the serious human and environmental costs surrounding sand and the profound global significance, which has received little public attention. Award-winning journalist Vince Beiser delves deep into this world, explaining why sand is so crucial to modern life. Along the way, readers encounter sand pirates, become aware of child sand miners, and learn that not all sand is created equal: Some of the easiest sand to get to, is the least useful. The result is an entertaining and eye-opening work, one that is both unexpected and involving, full of fascinating detail and populated by surprising people.
Science | HC | $44.99

The Art of Logic: How to Make Sense in a World that Doesn’t
Cheng, Eugenia
A survival guide for our post-truth world using the timeless methods of logic, from a Royal Society Prize shortlisted mathematician. Emotions are powerful. In newspaper headlines and on social media, they have become the primary way of understanding the world. But strong feelings make it more difficult to see the reality behind the rhetoric. In The Art of Logic, Eugenia Cheng shows how mathematical logic can help us see things more clearly – and know when politicians and companies are trying to mislead us. First, Cheng explains how to use black-and-white logic to illuminate the world around us, giving us new insight into thorny political questions like public healthcare, Black Lives Matter and Brexit. Then she explains how logic and emotions, used side-by-side, can help us not only to be more rational individuals, but also to live more thoughtfully. Clear-sighted, revelatory and filled with useful real-life examples of logic and illogic at work, The Art of Logic is an essential guide to decoding modern life.
Logic | TP | $29.99

The Equations of Life: The Hidden Rules Shaping Evolution
Cockell, Charles
Why do gazelles have legs and not wheels? Why is all life based on carbon rather than silicon? Why do humans have eyes on the front of their heads? And beyond earth, would life – if it should exist – look like our own? The puzzles of life astound and confuse us like no other mystery. An astrophysicist once conceded that even the smallest insect is far more complex than either an atom or a star. But in this ground-breaking new account of the process of evolution, Professor Charles Cockell reveals how nature is far more understandable and predictable than we would think. Refining Darwin’s theory of natural selection, Cockell puts forward a remarkable and elegant account of why evolution has taken the paths it has. The key is understanding how fundamental physical laws constrain nature’s direction and form, at every turn. From the animal kingdom to the atomic realm, he shows how physics is the true touchstone for understanding life in all its extraordinary forms. Provocative and captivating, this book will fundamentally change how you view the world.
Science | TP | $29.99

Origins: How The Earth Made Us
Dartnell, Lewis
Why do so many of us eat cereal for breakfast? Is it because we like the taste? Or because 20 millions years ago, a certain species of plant colonised the same hospitable land that humanity did? Why is the world the way it is? If we follow chains of explanation as far back as they go – and keep asking, like a curious child, ‘Why? Why? But, why?’ – the answers become more and more amazing. We reach the point where history becomes science. In this ultimate origin story, Professor Lewis Dartnell investigates how the fabric and activity of our planet have governed our evolution, influenced civilisations over millennia, and continue to shape our lives today. Plate tectonics and ancient climate change, atmospheric circulation and ocean currents – Origins unravels the human story by exposing vast webs of connections that stretch deep into the past, underwrite our modern world and help us face the challenges of the future.
Science/History | TP | $35.00

Lying for Money: How Legendary Frauds Reveal the Workings of the World
Davies, Dan
Understand financial crime and you understand the world. Here’s how. Financial crime seems horribly complicated but there are only so many ways you can con someone out of what’s theirs. In fact, there are four. A veteran regulatory economist and market analyst, Dan Davies has years of experience picking the bones out of some of the most famous frauds of the modern age. Now, he reveals the big picture that emerges from their labyrinths of deceit. Along the way, you’ll find out how to fake a gold mine with a wedding ring, a file and a shotgun. You’ll see how close Charles Ponzi, the king of pyramid schemes, came to acquiring his own private navy. You’ll learn how fraud has shaped the entire development of the modern world economy. And you’ll discover whether you have what it takes to be a white-collar criminal mastermind, if that’s what you want to be. (Which you don’t. You really, really don’t.)
Finance and accounting/Law | HC | $35.00

The Persecution of the Templars: Scandal, Torture, Trial
Demurger, Alain
The trial of the Knights Templar is one of the most infamous in history. Accused of heresy by the king of France, the Templars were arrested and imprisoned, had their goods seized and their monasteries ransacked. Under brutal interrogation and torture, many made shocking confessions: denial of Christ, desecration of the Cross, sex acts and more. This book follows the everyday reality of the trial, from the early days of scandal and scheming in 1305, via torture, imprisonment and the dissolution of the order, to 1314, when leaders Jacques de Molay and Geoffroy de Charnay were burned at the stake. Through first-hand testimony and written records of the interrogations of 231 French Templars, this book illuminates the stories of hundreds of ordinary members, some of whom testified at the trial, as well as the many others who denied the charges or retracted their confessions. A deeply researched and immersive account that gives a striking vision of the relentless persecution, and the oft-underestimated resistance, of the once-mighty Knights Templar.
History | HC | $49.99

A Crack in Creation: The New Power to Control Evolution
Doudna, Jennifer & Sternberg, Samuel
A handful of discoveries have changed the course of human history. This book is about the most recent and potentially the most powerful and dangerous of them all. It is an invention that allows us to rewrite the genetic code that shapes and controls all living beings with astonishing accuracy and ease. Thanks to it, the dreams of genetic manipulation have become a stark reality: the power to cure disease and alleviate suffering, to create new sources of food and energy, as well as to re-design any species, including humans, for our own ends. Jennifer Doudna is the co-inventor of this technology – known as CRISPR – and a scientist of worldwide renown. Writing with fellow researcher Samuel Sternberg, here she provides the definitive account of her discovery, explaining how this wondrous invention works and what it is capable of. She also asks us to consider what our new-found power means: how do we enjoy its unprecedented benefits while avoiding its equally unprecedented dangers? The future of humankind – and of all life on Earth – is at stake. This book is an essential guide to the path that now lies ahead.
Science | PBK | $22.99

Australia’s First Spies: The remarkable story of Australia’s intelligence operations, 1901-45
Fahey, John
The first systematic account of Australian intelligence operations in the early 20th century offers fascinating new insights into Australian politics and international relations. Australia was born with its eyes wide open. Although politicians spoke publicly of loyalty to Britain and the empire, in secret they immediately set about protecting Australia’s interests from the Germans, the Japanese – and from Britain itself. As an experienced intelligence officer, John Fahey knows how the security services disguise their activities within government files. He has combed the archives to compile the first account of Australia’s intelligence operations in the years from Federation to the end of World War II. He tells the stories of dedicated patriots who undertook dangerous operations to protect their new nation, despite a lack of training and support. He shows how the early adoption of advanced radio technology by Australia contributed to the war effort in Europe. He also exposes the bureaucratic mismanagement in World War II that cost many lives, and the leaks that compromised Australia’s standing with its wartime allies so badly that Australia was nearly expelled from the Anglo-Saxon intelligence network. Australia’s First Spies shows Australia always has been a far savvier operator in international affairs than much of the historical record suggests, and it offers a glimpse into the secret history of the nation.
Espionage/History | TP | $34.99

Notes on a Nervous Planet
Haig, Matt
A vital look at how to feel happy, human and whole in the twenty-first century. The world is messing with our minds. Rates of stress and anxiety are rising. A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives. We are more connected… yet, feel more alone. And we are encouraged to worry about everything from world politics to our body mass index. How can we stay sane on a planet that makes us mad? How do we stay human in a technological world? How do we feel happy, when we are encouraged to be anxious? After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, these questions became urgent matters of life and death for Matt Haig. And he began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him. A follow-up to Reasons to Stay Alive, Notes on a Nervous Planet is a personal and vital look at how to feel happy, human and whole in the 21st century.
Philosophy | HC | $27.99

Buzz: The Nature and Necessity of Bees
Hanson, Thor
A superb natural and cultural history of bees – the only such book to celebrate their full diversity. In Buzz, the award-winning author of Feathers and The Triumph of Seeds takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young. From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They’ve given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers, and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing. As informative and enchanting as the waggle dance of a honeybee, Buzz shows us why all bees are wonders to celebrate and protect. Read this book and you’ll never overlook them again.
Science | TP | $29.99

Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy
Harford, Tim
Who thought up paper money? How did the contraceptive pill change the face of the legal profession? Why was the horse collar as important for human progress as the steam engine? How did the humble spreadsheet turn the world of finance upside-down? The world economy defies comprehension. A continuously-changing system of immense complexity, it offers over ten billion distinct products and services, doubles in size every fifteen years, and links almost every one of the planet’s seven billion people. It delivers astonishing luxury to hundreds of millions. It also leaves hundreds of millions behind, puts tremendous strains on the ecosystem, and has an alarming habit of stalling. Nobody is in charge of it. Indeed, no individual understands more than a fraction of what’s going on. How can we make sense of this bewildering system on which our lives depend? From the tally-stick to Bitcoin, the canal lock to the jumbo jet, each invention in Tim Harford’s fascinating new book has its own curious, surprising and memorable story, a vignette against a grand backdrop. Step by step, readers will start to understand where we are, how we got here, and where we might be going next. Hidden connections will be laid bare: how the barcode undermined family corner shops; why the gramophone widened inequality; how barbed wire shaped America. We’ll meet the characters who developed some of these inventions, profited from them, or were ruined by them. We’ll trace the economic principles that help to explain their transformative effects. And we’ll ask what lessons we can learn to make wise use of future inventions, in a world where the pace of innovation will only accelerate.
Economics/Society and culture | PBK | $22.99

Milk! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Kurlansky, Mark
According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera’s breast milk became our galaxy, ‘The Milky Way’. But while mother’s milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanisation made milk safety into a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurisation slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurisation. Profoundly intertwined with human civilisation, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid’s diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.
History/Science | HC | $32.99

Improbable Destinies: How Predictable is Evolution?
Losos, Jonathan
The natural world is full of fascinating instances of convergence: phenomena like eyes and wings and tree-climbing lizards that have evolved independently, multiple times. Convergence suggests that evolution is predictable, and if we could replay the tape of life, we would get the same outcome. But there are also many examples of contingency, cases where the tiniest change – a random mutation or an ancient butterfly sneeze – caused evolution to take a completely different course. In Improbable Destinies, renowned researcher Jonathan Losos reveals what the latest breakthroughs in evolutionary biology tell us about one of the greatest ongoing debates in science. Evolution can occur far more rapidly than Darwin expected, which has opened the door to something that was previously thought impossible: experimental studies of evolution in nature. Drawing on his own work with anole lizards on the Caribbean islands, as well as studies of guppies, foxes, field mice and others being conducted around the world, Losos reveals just how rapid and predictable evolution can be. By charting the discoveries of the scientists who are rewriting our understanding of evolutionary biology, Improbable Destinies will change the way we think and talk about evolution.
Science | PBK | $22.99

The Golden Ratio: The Divine Beauty of Mathematics
Meisner, Gary B & Araujo, Rafael (artist)
From the pyramids of Giza, to quasicrystals, to the proportions of the human face, the golden ratio has an infinite capacity to generate shapes with exquisite properties. This book invites you to take a new look at this timeless topic, with a compilation of research and information worthy of a text book, accompanied by over 200 beautiful colour illustrations that transform this into the ultimate coffee table book. The evidence will close the gaps of understanding related to many claims of the golden ratio’s appearances and applications, and present new findings to take our knowledge further yet. Whoever you are, and whatever you may know about this topic, you’ll find something new, interesting, and informative in this book, and may find yourself challenged to see, apply, and share this unique number of mathematics and science in new ways.
Mathematics | HC | $39.99

The Spinning Magnet: The Force That Created the Modern World – and Could Destroy It
Mitchell, Alanna
The fascinating history of electromagnetism and how, in the not-so-distant future, the Earth’s poles will switch places – with potentially catastrophic results… North is north and south is south. Or is it? Every once in a long while, the Earth’s magnetic poles switch places. It’s happened many times in deep history, but never since humans walked the planet. After the next big switch, our compasses will point the wrong way and we will no longer be able to see the aurora borealis in Iceland. But that’s not all. It might just push us back into the Stone Age. Beginning with the first investigations into electromagnetism, The Spinning Magnet charts a fascinating history of one of the most powerful forces in the universe. Award-winning science journalist Alanna Mitchell reveals how the Victorians made their pivotal discoveries, delves into unseen and unforeseen natural forces that threaten our planet, and warns of a possible future where solar radiation storms wipe out power grids and electronic communication across the globe.
History/Science | HC | $36.99

Quantum Economics: The New Science of Money
Orrell, David
A decade after the financial crisis, there is a growing consensus that economics has failed and needs to go back to the drawing board. David Orrell argues that it has been trying to solve the wrong problem all along. Economics sees itself as the science of scarcity. Instead, it should be the science of money (which plays a surprisingly small role in mainstream theory). And money is a substance that turns out to have a quantum nature of its own. Just as physicists learn about matter by studying the exchange of particles at the subatomic level, so economics should begin by analysing the nature of money-based transactions. Quantum Economics, therefore, starts with the meaning of the phrase ‘how much’ – or, to use the Latin word, quantum. From quantum physics to the dualistic properties of money, via the emerging areas of quantum finance and quantum cognition, this profoundly important book reveals that quantum economics is to neoclassical economics what quantum physics is to classical physics – a genuine turning point in our understanding.
Economics | TP | $29.99

Bitch Doctrine: Essays for Dissenting Adults
Penny, Laurie
Smart and provocative, witty and uncompromising, this collection of Laurie Penny’s writing establishes her as one of the most urgent and vibrant feminist voices of our time. From the shock of Donald Trump’s election and the victories of the far right, to online harassment and the transgender rights movement, these darkly humorous articles provoke challenging conversations about the definitive social issues of today. Penny is lyrical and passionate in her desire to contest injustice; she writes at the raw edge of the zeitgeist at a time when it has never been more vital to confront social norms. These revelatory, revolutionary essays will give readers hope and tools for change from one of today’s boldest commentators. ‘I can’t really think of another writer who so consistently and bravely keeps thinking and talking and learning and trying to make the world better’ – Caitlin Moran.
Essays | PBK | $19.99

Humans: A Brief History of How We F*cked It All Up
Phillips, Tom
An exhilarating journey through the most creative and catastrophic f*ck ups in human history, from our very first ancestor falling out of that tree, to the most spectacular fails of the present day. In the seventy thousand years that modern human beings have walked this earth, we’ve come a long way. Art, science, culture, trade – on the evolutionary food chain, we’re real winners. But, frankly, it’s not exactly been plain sailing, and sometimes – just occasionally – we’ve managed to really, truly, quite unbelievably f*ck things up. From Chairman Mao’s Four Pests Campaign, to the American Dustbowl; from the Austrian army attacking itself, one drunken night; to the world’s leading superpower electing a reality TV mogul as President… it’s pretty safe to say that, as a species, we haven’t exactly grown wiser with age. So, next time you think you’ve really f*cked up, this book will remind you: it could be so much worse…
Science/History/Humour | TP | $29.99

The Earth Gazers
Potter, Christopher
The fascinating story of how we first came to see the earth from space. For thousands of years, we have struggled to rise above the surface of the Earth. 2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the moment three human beings escaped the pull of the Earth’s gravitational field for the first time, and saw what no one had ever seen before, the Earth as a sphere falling through the empty darkness of space. Even today, only 24 people have had that experience: the Apollo astronauts who went on the nine manned missions to the moon that took place between 1968 and 1972. The astronauts returned with photographic evidence that the Earth was beautiful, seemingly fragile and different from any other heavenly body. The photographs known as Earthrise, taken during the first manned mission, and The Blue Marble, taken during the last mission, have become two of the most reproduced and most influential images of all time. They were taken almost as an afterthought and inspired a whole generation to think about our responsibility for this tiny oasis in space. In his remarkably wide-ranging book, Christopher Potter writes of the early heroic days of aviation and of the often-blemished visionaries who inspired the journey into space: Charles Lindbergh, Robert Goddard and Wernher von Braum. Now, more than ever, the need to see ourselves from an outside-perspective is urgent. Can we learn to see ourselves for what we truly are: inhabitants of a world without borders? The Earth Gazers is a timely and entrancingly written exploration of the ways in which this new perspective on ourselves did indeed change us, and of how the opportunity for truly radical change was thwarted.
Science | PBK | $19.99

The Consolations of Physics (or, the Solace of Quantum)
Radford, Tim
The Consolations of Physics is an eloquent manifesto for physics. In an age where uncertainty and division is rife, Tim Radford, science editor of the Guardian for twenty-five years, turns to the wonders of the universe for consolation. From the launch of the Voyager spacecraft and how it furthered our understanding of planets, stars and galaxies to the planet composed entirely of diamond and graphite and the sound of a blacksmith’s anvil; from the hole NASA drilled in the heavens to the discovery of the Higgs Boson and the endeavours to prove the Big Bang, The Consolations of Physics will guide you from a tiny particle to the marvels of outer space.
Science | HC | $39.99

Depends What You Mean by Extremist
Safran, John
Expecting skinheads, John Safran rocked up to a far-right rally in Melbourne. What he found led him into the mad world of misfits, who helped propel the second coming of Pauline Hanson and foreshadowed the era of Trump. No one turns up where they’re not wanted quite like John Safran. In this hilarious and disorienting adventure he gets among our diverse community of white nationalists, ISIS supporters, anarchists and more, digging away at the contradictions that many would prefer be left unexamined. Who is this black puppet-master among the white nationalists? And this Muslim fundamentalist who geeks out on Monty Python? Is there a secret radicalisation network operating in John’s own Jewish suburb? And ultimately – is hanging with all these radicals washing off on John, himself? Populated by an extraordinary cast of ‘ordinary’ Australians, Depends What You Mean by Extremist is a startling, confronting portrait of contemporary Australia. We all think we know what’s going on in our own country, but this larger-than-life, timely, and alarmingly insightful true story will make you think again… Drinking shots with nationalists and gobbling falafel with radicals, John Safran was there the year the extreme became the mainstream.
Society and culture | PBK | $22.99

The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age_
Sanger, David E
From Russia’s tampering with the US election to the WannaCry hack that temporarily crippled Britain’s NHS, cyber-attacks have the potential to wreak global devastation. Cheap to acquire, easily deniable, and used for a variety of malicious purposes – from crippling infrastructure to sowing discord and doubt – cyberweapons are rewriting the rules of warfare. In less than a decade, they have displaced terrorism and nuclear missiles as the biggest immediate threat to international security and to democracy. Here, New York Times correspondent David E Sanger takes us from the White House Situation Room to the dens of Chinese government hackers and the boardrooms of Silicon Valley, piecing together a remarkable picture of a world, now coming face-to-face with the most sophisticated – and arguably most dangerous – weapon ever invented. The Perfect Weapon is the dramatic story of a new era of constant sabotage, misinformation, and fear, in which everyone is a target.
Technology/Diplomacy | TP | $32.99

Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution
Satia, Priya
History teaches that from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century the industrial revolution transformed Britain from an agricultural and artisanal economy to one dominated by industry and machine, ushering in unprecedented growth in technology and trade and putting the country at the centre of the world. In Empire of Guns, prize-winning historian Priya Satia argues that – far from the bucolic image of cotton mills that define popular perception – the true root of economic and imperial expansion was the lucrative military contracting that enabled the country’s near-constant state of war. Through in-depth research, Satia elucidates this story through the life of prominent British gun-maker and Quaker, Samuel Galton. Reconciling the pacifist tenet of his faith with the pragmatism of the times, he argued that the inescapable profitability of conflict meant all members of an industrialised economy were irrefutably complicit in war. Through his story, and a detailed study of the British gun trade, Satia illuminates the nation’s emergence as a global superpower, the roots of the government’s role in economic development, and the origins of our era’s debates about gun control. Empire of Guns expertly brings to life a bustling industrial society with a human story at its heart to offer a radically new understanding of a critical historical moment and all that followed from it.
History | HC | $59.99

Black Sunset: Hollywood Sex, Lies, Glamour, Betrayal, and Raging Egos
Sigal, Clancy
Mid-20th century Hollywood; ‘Raymond Chandler’s LA before Pilates and cell phones’. Clancy Sigal (who would later be the inspiration for Doris Lessing’s ‘Saul Green’) is just back from fighting in the Second World War and an abortive solo attempt to assassinate Hermann Goering at the Nuremburg trials. Charming his way into a job as an agent with the Sam Jaffe agency, Sigal plunges into a chaotic Hollywood peopled by fast women, washed-up screenwriters, wily directors, and star-struck FBI agents trailing ‘subversives’. He parties with the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, Tony Curtis and an anxious Peter Lorre, who becomes a drinking buddy. But this is the era of the Hollywood Blacklist and Sigal, like many of his contemporaries, is subpoenaed to testify before the HUAC. Will he give up the list of nine names, burning a hole in his pocket, to save his own skin? Hilarious, touching, intimate and revealing: Sigal’s memoir reads like a forgotten hardboiled detective novel and has all the makings of an instant classic.
History/Biography | PBK | $24.99

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World
Tooze, Adam
The definitive story of the Great Financial Crisis and how it continues to haunt our lives. In September 2008, the Great Financial Crisis, triggered by the collapse of Lehman brothers, shook the world. A decade later, its spectre still haunts us. As the appalling scope and scale of the crash was revealed, the financial institutions that had symbolised the West’s triumph since the end of the Cold War, seemed – through greed, malice and incompetence – to be about to bring the entire system to its knees. Crashed is a brilliantly original and assured analysis of what happened and how we were rescued from something even worse – but at a price which continues to undermine democracy across Europe and the United States. Gnawing away at our institutions are the many billions of dollars which were conjured up to prevent complete collapse. Over and over again, the end of the crisis has been announced, but it continues to hound us – whether in Greece or Ukraine, whether through Brexit or Trump. Adam Tooze follows the trail like no previous writer and has written a book compelling as history, as economic analysis and as political horror story.
Economics | HC | $69.99

Talking to My Daughter About the Economy: A Brief History of Capitalism
Varoufakis, Yanis
Why is there so much inequality? In this intimate and accessible book, world-famous economist Yanis Varoufakis sets out to answer his daughter Xenia’s deceptively simple question. Drawing on memories of her childhood and a variety of well-known tales – from Oedipus and Faust to Frankenstein and The MatrixTalking To My Daughter About the Economy explains everything you need to know in order to understand why economics is the most important drama of our times. It is a book that helps to make sense of a troubling world while inspiring us to make it a better one.
Economics/Culture and society | PBK | $22.99

2062: The World that AI Made
Walsh, Toby
‘We’ve had the run of planet earth for the last few hundred thousand years – this amazing blue-green dot, revolving around a rather typical star on a minor spiral arm of the Milky Way. We owe it to our child, homo digitalis, to get the next few decades right.’ 2062 is the year by which we will have built machines as intelligent as us. This is what leading AI and robotics experts predict. But what will this future actually look like? When the quest to build intelligent machines has been successful, how will life on this planet unfold? In 2062, Toby Walsh considers the impact AI will have on work, war, politics, economics, everyday human life and, indeed, human death. Will robots become conscious? Will automation take away jobs? Will we become immortal machines ourselves, uploading our brains to the cloud? What lies in store for homo digitalis – the people of the not-so-distant future who will be living amongst fully functioning artificial intelligence? In the tradition of Yuval Noah Harari’s Homo Deus, 2062 describes the choices we need to make today to ensure that future remains bright.
Technology/Society and culture | TP | $34.99

First as Tragedy, Then as Farce
Zizek, Slavoj
From the tragedy of 9/11 to the farce of the financial meltdown. Billions of dollars were hastily poured into the global banking system in a frantic attempt at financial stabilisation. So, why has it not been possible to bring the same forces to bear in addressing world poverty and environmental crisis? In this take-no-prisoners analysis, Slavoj Zizek frames the moral failures of the modern world in terms of the epoch-making events of the first decade of this century. What he finds is the old one-two punch of history: the jab of tragedy, the right hook of farce. In the attacks of 9/11 and the global credit crunch, liberalism dies twice: as a political doctrine and as an economic theory. The election of Donald Trump only confirms the bankruptcy of a liberal order on its last legs. First as Tragedy, Then as Farce is a call for the left to reinvent itself in the light of our desperate historical situation. The time for liberal, moralistic blackmail is over.
Politics | TP | $29.99