Non-Fiction Catalogue: April 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in April 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

No Ordinary Pilot: One young man’s extraordinary exploits in World War II (general aviation)
Campbell-Jones, Suzanne
After a lifetime in the RAF, Group Captain Bob Allen, finally allowed his children and grandchildren to see his official flying log. It contained the line: ‘Killed whilst on operations’. He refused to answer any further questions, leaving instead a memoir of his life during World War II. Joining up aged 19, within six months he was in No 1 Squadron flying a Hurricane in a dog fight over the Channel. For almost two years he lived in West Africa, fighting Germany’s Vichy French allies, as well as protecting the Southern Atlantic supply routes. Returning home at Christmas 1942, he retrained as a fighter-bomber pilot, flying Typhoons and was one of the first over the Normandy beaches on D-Day. On 25 July 1944, Bob was shot down, spending the rest of the war in a POW camp – where he was held in solitary confinement, interrogated by the Gestapo and imprisoned in the infamous Stalag Luft 3 and suffered the winter march of 1945, before being liberated by the Russians. Fleshing out Bob’s careful third-person memoir with detailed research, his daughter Suzanne Campbell-Jones tells the gripping story of a more or less ordinary man, who came home with extraordinary memories; which he kept to himself for more than 50 years.
Aviation history/memoir | HC | $36.99

North American XB-70 Valkyrie (X-Planes 7)
Davies, Peter E; Luijken, Wiek (illustrator); Tooby, Adam (illustrator)
Of the many futuristic military aircraft concepts created in the 1950s, the North American XB-70 still stands out as the most awe inspiring. With its huge, white, partially-folding delta wing, its fuselage resembling a striking cobra and its extraordinary performance, it was one of the foremost technological achievements of the 20th century. A strategic bomber built to outrun any Soviet fighter jet, it could reach Mach 3 with a full nuclear payload – as fast as the legendary SR-71 Blackbird, but more than three times the size. However, its role as a nuclear bomber was limited after the introduction of intercontinental ballistic missiles, and defence cuts eventually led to the project being scrapped, in the mid-1960s. The Valkyrie had a brief, costly decade of life but it proved the continuing value of developing manned bombers. However, almost half a century after the XB-70 its predecessor, the B-52, continues in service. Using full-colour artwork and rigorous analysis, this is the complete story of the ultimate US Cold War military X-plane.
Aviation history | PBK | $24.99

Zeppelin vs British Home Defence 1915–18 (Duel 85)
Guttman, Jon & Laurier, Jim (illustrator)
When Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin’s rigid airship LZ 1 flew over Lake Constance, in 1900, it was the most advanced and impressive flying machine in the world: a colossal, lighter-than-air craft capable of controlled flight. In World War I, Zeppelins were first used in a reconnaissance role; but on 19 January 1915, Kaiser Wilhelm II authorised their use in bombing strategic targets in England. From then on, ‘Zeppelin’ became synonymous with terror to the British, and indeed the airship’s effectiveness was more psychological than material. Still, their raids compelled the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service to embark on a program of modernising their aerial defences, accelerating a process that would ultimately make the aeroplane, rather than the airship, the paramount flying machine of the war. Using specially-commissioned artwork, contemporary photographs and first-hand accounts, this book tells the fascinating story of Britain’s first Blitz, from the airships who terrorised the public to the men who sought to defend the skies.
Aviation history | PBK | $24.99

Soviet Destroyers of World War II (New Vanguard 256)
Hill, Alexander & Rodríguez, Felipe (illustrator)
The Soviet Navy that faced the German onslaught in 1941, boasted a mixture of modern warships, often built with foreign technical assistance, and antiquated warships from the Tsarist era that were modernised for the conflict. Some Soviet naval vessels saw limited involvement in the war against Finland in 1939–40, but the main action occurred after the German invasion, when these destroyers escorted convoys, fought battles against other destroyers and the deadly threat posed by attacking aircraft, and provided fire support for Soviet troops. From the Gnevny class of the pre-war period to the specialist destroyer leaders of the Leningrad class and the unique TashkentSoviet Destroyers of World War II is a detailed guide to the often-forgotten destroyers of the Soviet Navy.
Naval history | PBK | $22.99

Finland at War: The Winter War 1939–40 (general military)
Nenye, Vesa; Munter, Peter; Wirtanen, Toni; Birks, Chris
The story of the ‘Winter War’ between Finland and Soviet Russia is a dramatic David versus Goliath encounter. When close to half a million Soviet troops poured into Finland, in 1939, it was expected that Finnish defences would collapse in a matter of weeks. But they held firm. The Finns not only survived the initial attacks but succeeded in inflicting devastating casualties before superior Russian numbers eventually forced a peace settlement. This is a rigorously-detailed and utterly-compelling guide to Finland’s vital, but almost forgotten role in the cataclysmic World War II. It reveals the untold story of iron determination, unparalleled skill and utter mastery of winter warfare that characterised Finland’s fight for survival on the hellish Eastern Front. Finland at War: the Winter War 1939–40 is the premiere English-language history of the fighting performance of the Finns, drawing on first-hand accounts and previously unpublished photographs to explain just how they were able to perform military feats that nearly defy belief.
Military history | PBK | $36.99

 

General non-fiction

Designed in the USSR: 1950–89 (from the collection of the Moscow Design Museum)

This captivating survey of Soviet design from 1950 to 1989 features more than 350 items from the Moscow Design Museum’s unique collection. From children’s toys, homewares, and fashion to posters, electronics, and space-race ephemera, each object reveals something of life in a planned economy during a fascinating time in Russia’s history. Organised into three chapters – Citizen, State, and World – the book is a micro-to-macro tour of the functional, kitsch, politicised, and often avant-garde designs from this largely undocumented period.
Design/history | HC | $49.95

Beyond Weird: Why everything you thought you knew about quantum physics is different
Ball, Philip
‘I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.’ Richard Feynman wrote this in 1965 – the year he was awarded the Nobel prize in physics for his work on quantum mechanics. Quantum physics is regarded as one of the most obscure and impenetrable subjects in all of science. But when Feynman said he didn’t understand quantum mechanics, he didn’t mean that he couldn’t do it – he meant that’s all he could do. He didn’t understand what the maths was saying: what quantum mechanics tells us about reality. Over the past decade or so, the enigma of quantum mechanics has come into sharper focus. We now realise that quantum mechanics is less about particles and waves, uncertainty and fuzziness, than a theory about information: about what can be known and how. This is more disturbing than our bad habit of describing the quantum world as ‘things behaving weirdly’ suggests. It calls into question the meanings and limits of space and time, cause and effect, and knowledge itself. The quantum world isn’t a different world: it is our world, and if anything deserves to be called ‘weird’, it’s us. This exhilarating book is about what quantum maths really means – and what it doesn’t mean. ‘This is the book I wish I could have written but am very glad I’ve read’ – Jim Al-Khalili.
Quantum physics, mechanics, and maths | TP | $29.99

Weird Maths: At the Edge of Infinity and Beyond
Banerjee, Agnijo & Darling, David
Could we ever see the world in four dimensions? Is anything truly random? Does infinity actually exist? In this delightful journey of discovery, David Darling and extraordinary child prodigy Agnijo Banerjee draw connections between the cutting edge of modern maths and life as we understand it, delving into the strange – would we like alien music? – and venturing out on philosophical quests to consider the existence of free will and the proof (or disproof) of God. Packed with puzzles and paradoxes, mind-bending concepts and surprising solutions, this is for anyone who wants life’s questions answered – even those you never knew to ask.
Mathematics | PBK | $24.99

Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion
Bloom, Paul
In a divided world, empathy is not the solution, it is the problem. We think of empathy – the ability to feel the suffering of others for ourselves – as the ultimate source of all good behaviour. But while it inspires care and protection in personal relationships, it has the opposite effect in the wider world. As the latest research in psychology and neuroscience shows, we feel empathy most for those we find attractive and who seem similar to us and not at all for those who are different, distant or anonymous. Empathy therefore biases us in favour of individuals we know while numbing us to the plight of thousands. Guiding us expertly through the experiments, case studies and arguments on all sides, Paul Bloom ultimately shows that some of our worst decisions – in charity, child raising, criminal justice, climate change and war – are motivated by this wolf in sheep’s clothing. Brilliantly argued, urgent and humane, Against Empathy overturns widely held assumptions to reveal one of the most profound yet overlooked sources of human conflict.
Philosophy/society and culture | PBK | $22.99

The Animals Among Us: the New Science of Anthrozoology
Bradshaw, John
Keeping pets is expensive, time consuming, and seemingly irrational – so why do so many of us have an animal in our lives? Pet-keeping is much more than just a simple pastime. As John Bradshaw reveals in this highly original new work, our connection with animals is one of the very things that makes us human. In The Animals Among Us, Bradshaw takes us to the heart of Anthrozoology, a new science dedicated to discovering the true nature and depth of the human-animal bond. Following the thread of our affection for animals, from today’s pet lovers all the way back to our ancient ancestors, Bradshaw reveals how animals have always been an integral part of our lives: indeed, they have shaped the evolution of our minds and our bodies. Now, as increasing numbers of species are under threat, John Bradshaw warns us that if we lose the animals among us, we risk losing an essential part of ourselves.
Anthrozoology | PBK | $22.99

Everything You Know About Space Is Wrong
Brown, Matt
Matt Brown brings you a compendium of amazing facts about our planet, the universe, and everything in between! Thanks to popular sci-fi films and TV shows, there have been many misconceptions about the cosmos – from travelling through wormholes to blowing up asteroids. In Everything You Know About Space is Wrong, you’ll find a plethora of myths, legends and misquotes that have shaped the way you view the universe today. Think that the vacuum of space would make your blood boil and your head explode? It won’t, and there have been people who have survived without wearing a suit in space. Think that astronauts float in space, because there is zero gravity? They’re actually constantly falling towards the Earth. Think that the colour of space is black? It’s actually predominantly green. Chock-full of facts about the cosmos, how it works (and how it doesn’t!), this illuminating book will guide you through the mine of misinformation to answer such questions as whether we will meet aliens in our lifetime (SETI predicts we’ll find evidence of ET, by 2040!), what happens in the centre of the black hole, and why Mercury is not the hottest planet in the solar system. Discovering untruths about popular science, Everything You Know About Space is Wrong provides a hugely entertaining insight into our universe.
Cosmology | HC | $19.99

Timbuktu (Ladybird Expert)
Casely-Hayford, Gus
A clear, simple and entertaining introduction to the land once considered the jewel of the medieval world. Written by curator and cultural historian Gus Caseley-Hayford, this book delves into the rise of the largest empire in West Africa and what made Timbuktu the most significant Saharan desert-port of the age. You’ll see the Mali Empire in its golden age, teeming with riches, scholars and trade. A history steeped in magicians, epic wars, storytellers and missing ships. You’ll learn what made Timbuktu so notorious and irresistible to the Emperor, and why centuries later it still enchants the Western World with its beauty, wealth, mystery, intellectual excellence and legacy.
History/legend | HC | $19.99

The Ascent of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Force that Explains Everything
Chown, Marcus
Gravity was the first force to be recognised and described, yet it is still the least understood. If we can unlock its secrets, the force that keeps our feet on the ground holds the key to understanding the biggest questions in science: what is space? What is time? What is the universe? And where did it all come from? Award-winning writer Marcus Chown takes us on an unforgettable journey – from the recognition of the ‘force’ of gravity in 1666, to the discovery of gravitational waves in the twenty-first century. And, as we stand on the brink of a seismic revolution in our worldview, he brings us up to speed on the greatest challenge ever to confront physics.
Physics | PBK | $22.99

Follow This Thread: A Maze Book to Get Lost In
Eliot, Henry
As a rule, we take care not to get lost, so why should we willingly enter a maze? Illustrated with a single red line, Follow This Thread examines dozens of real and historical mazes, and their uses in literature, art and film, from Pac-Man and Picasso to Kubrick and Kafka. Henry Eliot traces the history of our ancient relationship with mazes and labyrinths, and unpicks the paradoxical psychology involved in walking them, combining the myth of the Minotaur and a quest for the legendary Maze King, who disappeared in 1979. The text coils around the pages, recreating the experience of walking a labyrinth: at the ‘centre’ the reader physically turns the book upside down and continues reading backwards.
Art/landscape/puzzles | HC | $39.99

Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia
Gergis, Joëlle
What does climate change in Australia really look like? What was Australia’s climate like before official weather records began? How do scientists use tree rings, ice cores and tropical corals to retrace the past? What do Indigenous seasonal calendars reveal? And what do settler diary entries about rainfall, droughts, bushfires and snowfalls tell us about natural climate cycles? Sunburnt Country pieces together Australia’s climate history for the first time. It uncovers a continent long vulnerable to climate extremes and variability. It gives an unparalleled perspective on how human activities have altered patterns that have been with us for millions of years, and what climate change looks like in our own backyard. Sunburnt Country highlights the impact of a warming planet on Australian lifestyles and ecosystems and the power we all have to shape future life on Earth.
Climate change | TP | $34.99

Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life
Godfrey-Smith, Peter
In Other Minds, Peter Godfrey-Smith, a distinguished philosopher of science and a skilled scuba diver, tells a bold new story of how nature became aware of itself – a story that largely occurs in the ocean, where animals first appeared. Tracking the mind’s fitful development from unruly clumps of seaborne cells to the first evolved nervous systems in ancient relatives of jellyfish, he explores the incredible evolutionary journey of the cephalopods, which began as inconspicuous molluscs who would later abandon their shells to rise above the ocean floor, searching for prey and acquiring the greater intelligence needed to do so – a journey completely independent from the route that mammals and birds would later take. But what kind of intelligence do cephalopods possess? How did the octopus, a solitary creature with little social life, become so smart? What is it like to have eight tentacles that are so packed with neurons that they virtually ‘think for themselves’? By tracing the question of inner life back to its roots and comparing human beings with our most remarkable animal relatives, Godfrey-Smith casts crucial new light on the octopus mind – and on our own.
Science/marine biology | PBK | $19.99

Science: A History in 100 Experiments
Gribbin, John & Gribbin, Mary
The history of science is a fascinating and long one, covering thousands of years of history. The development of scientific experiments involves some of the most enlightened cultures in history, as well as some great scientists, philosophers and theologians. As the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman said, ‘If it disagrees with experiment, it is wrong’, the simplest summary of what science is all about. And science is nothing without experiments. Everything in the scientific world view is based on experiment, including observations of phenomena predicted by theories and hypotheses, such as the bending of light as it goes past the Sun. From the discovery of microscopic worlds to weighing the Earth, from making electricity to the accelerating Universe and gravitational waves, this stunning book by renowned science writers John and Mary Gribbin tells the fascinating history of science through the stories of 100 ground-breaking experiments.
Science/history | PBK | $24.99

The Physics of Everyday Things: The Extraordinary Science Behind an Ordinary Day
Kakalios, James
Physics professor, bestselling author and dynamic storyteller James Kakalios reveals the mind-bending science behind the seemingly basic things that keep our daily lives running, from our smartphones and digital ‘clouds’ to x-ray machines and hybrid vehicles. Most of us are clueless when it comes to the physics that makes our modern world so convenient. What’s the simple science behind motion sensors, touch screens and toasters? How do we enter our offices using touch-on passes, or find our way to new places using GPS? In The Physics of Everyday Things, James Kakalios takes us on an amazing journey into the subatomic marvels that underlie so much of what we use and take for granted. Breaking down the world of things into a single day, Kakalios engages our curiosity about how our refrigerators keep food cool, how a plane manages to remain airborne, and how our wrist fitness monitors keep track of our steps. Each explanation is coupled with a story revealing the interplay of the astonishing invisible forces that surround us. Through this ‘narrative physics’, The Physics of Everyday Things demonstrates that – far from the abstractions conjured by terms like the Higgs boson, black holes and gravity waves – sophisticated science is also quite practical. With his signature clarity and inventiveness, Kakalios ignites our imaginations and enthrals us with the principles that make up our lives.
Physics | TP | $29.99

How to Fix the Future: Staying Human in the Digital Age
Keen, Andrew
In How to Fix the Future, Andrew Keen combines his experiences in Silicon Valley with extensive interviews and analysis to identify the strategies we need, in order to tackle the huge challenges of this digital century. This ground-breaking book is the result of extensive travels around the world, from India to Estonia, Germany to Singapore. He examines the best (and worst) practices in five key areas – competition, innovation, oversight, self-regulation and social responsibility – and concludes by examining whether we are seeing the beginning of the end of the America-centric digital world. Throughout, he shows that the stakes could not be higher: how can we remain human in an age of digital machines?
Social forecasting/future studies | TP | $29.99

The Enigma of Reason: A New Theory of Human Understanding
Mercier, Hugo & Sperber, Dan
Reason, we are told, is what makes us human, the source of our knowledge and wisdom. If reason is so useful, why didn’t it also evolve in other animals? If reason is that reliable, why do we produce so much thoroughly reasoned nonsense? In their ground-breaking account of the evolution and workings of reason, Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber set out to solve this double enigma. Reason, they argue with a compelling mix of real-life and experimental evidence, is not geared to solitary use, to arriving at better beliefs and decisions on our own. What reason does, rather, is help us justify our beliefs and actions to others, convince them through argumentation, and evaluate the justifications and arguments that others address to us. The Enigma of Reason will spark debate among psychologists and philosophers, and make many reasonable people rethink their own thinking.
Essays: philosophy | PBK | $22.99

The Crash Detectives: Investigating the World’s Most Mysterious Air Disasters
Negroni, Christine
A fascinating exploration of how humans and machines fail – leading to air disasters from Amelia Earhart to MH370 – and how the lessons learned from these accidents have made flying safer. Veteran aviation journalist and air safety investigator Christine Negroni takes the reader inside crash investigations from the early days of the jet age to the present, including the search for answers about what happened to the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. As Negroni dissects each accident, she explores the common themes and, most importantly, what has been learned from them to make planes safer. Indeed, as Negroni shows, virtually every aspect of modern pilot training, airline operation and aircraft design has been shaped by lessons learned from disaster. Along the way, she also details some miraculous saves, when quick-thinking pilots averted catastrophe and kept hundreds of people alive. Tying in aviation science, performance psychology and extensive interviews with pilots, engineers, human factors specialists, crash survivors and others involved in accidents all over the world, The Crash Detectives is an alternately terrifying and inspiring book that might just cure your fear of flying; and will definitely make you a more informed passenger.
Aviation history | PBK | $22.99

The Lion and the Unicorn (Penguin Modern Classics)
Orwell, George
Orwell’s moving reflections on the English character and his passionate belief in the need for political change. This is the most powerful portrait of England – and why it must change – ever written. Composed as bombs were falling over London at the height of the blitz, it remains as radical, witty and crucial today, as it was in 1941. The Lion and the Unicorn was written in London during the worst period of the Blitz. It is vintage Orwell, a dynamic outline of his belief in socialism, patriotism and an English revolution. His fullest political statement, it has been described as ‘one of the most moving and incisive portraits of the English character’ and is as relevant now as it ever has been.
Essays: politics/society and culture | PBK | $19.99

Spaceport Earth: the Reinvention of Spaceflight
Pappalardo, Joe
The twenty-first century space industry is changing drastically where private sector companies (eg: Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic SpaceshipOne and Elon Musk’s SpaceX) are building a dizzying array of new space crafts and rockets, not just for government use, but for any paying customer. At the heart of this space revolution are spaceports, the centre and literal launching pad of spaceflight. The up-front costs of spaceports are measured in the hundreds of millions of dollars, the competition is extreme, and failure is unforgivable… and often fatal. Aerospace journalist Joe Pappalardo has witnessed rocket launches around the world, visiting every working spaceport in the US. In his comprehensive book Spaceport Earth, Pappalardo describes the rise of a plethora of private companies in space tourism and how they are reshaping the way the world is using space for industry and science. Spaceport Earth is a travelogue through modern space history as it is being made. From the Cape Canaveral to the jungle launch site in French Guiana, spaceflight fanatics will appreciate the close perspective to launch sites, while those new to the industry will be enamoured by stories of the industrial titans, engineers, billionaires, schemers and politicians who are redefining what it means for humans to be a spacefaring species.
Space exploration/industry | HC | $34.99

History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet
Patel, Raj & Moore, Jason W
Nature, Money, Work, Care, Food, Energy, and Lives. These are the seven things that have made our world and will continue to shape its future. By making these things cheap, modern commerce has controlled, transformed, and devastated the Earth. In A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things, Raj Patel and Jason W Moore present a new approach to analysing today’s planetary emergencies. Bringing the latest ecological research together with histories of colonialism, indigenous struggles, slave revolts, and other uprisings, Patel and Moore demonstrate how throughout history, crises have always provided fresh opportunities to make the world cheap and safe for capitalism. At a time of crisis, for all these seven cheap things, innovative systemic thinking is urgently required. This book proposes a radical new way of understanding – and reclaiming – the planet in the turbulent twenty-first century.
History/Business and finance/Society and culture | TP | $34.99

What Would Keynes Do?: How the greatest political theorists would solve your everyday problems
Pettinger, Tejvan
By comparing and contrasting what the greatest economists of all time would have to say about 40 questions from your everyday life, What Would Keynes Do? will help you get to grips with all the important economic theories in an original and thought-provoking way. Includes such puzzling conundrums as: Should I park in an illegal parking space and risk a fine? Should I go to university or start working straight away? Should I leave my children all my wealth after my death or spread it out throughout my life? Should I ever commit a crime? If I enjoy drinking beer, how much should I drink? Is it okay to be selfish? Should I vote for a political party which promises to raise taxes? Also still available: What Would Freud Do? and What Would Nietzsche Do? (PBK, $22.99 each).
Politics/economics/philosophy | PBK | $22.99

The Work I Did: A Memoir of the Secretary to Goebbels
Pomsel, Brunhilde & Hansen, Thore D
‘I know no one ever believes us nowadays – everyone thinks we knew everything. We knew nothing. It was all a well-kept secret. We believed it. We swallowed it. It seemed entirely plausible.’ Brunhilde Pomsel described herself as an ‘apolitical girl’ and a ‘figure on the margins’. How are we to reconcile this description with her chosen profession? Employed as a typist during the Second World War, she worked closely with one of the worst criminals in world history: Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. She was one of the oldest surviving eyewitnesses to the internal workings of the Nazi power apparatus, until her death in 2017. Her life, mirroring all the major breaks and continuities of the twentieth century, illustrates how far-right politics, authoritarian regimes and dictatorships can rise, and how political apathy can erode democracy. Compelling and unnerving, The Work I Did gives us intimate insight into political complexity at society’s highest levels – at one of history’s darkest moments.
Memoir | TP | $27.99

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
Rosling, Hans; Rosling, Ola; Ronnlund, Anna Rosling
‘This book is my last battle, in my lifelong mission to fight devastating ignorance, and my final attempt at making an impact on the world. It has been my daily inspiration and joy. In my previous battles I armed myself with huge data sets, beautiful software, an energetic lecturing style and a Swedish bayonet for sword swallowing. It wasn’t enough. But I hope that this book will be.’ When you ask people simple questions about global trends, they systematically get the answers wrong. How many young women go to school? What’s the average life expectancy across the world? What will the global population will be in 2050? Do the majority of people live in rich or poor countries? In Factfulness, Hans Rosling and his two lifelong collaborators, Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling-Ronnlund, show why this happens. Based on a lifetime’s work promoting a fact-based worldview, they reveal the ten dramatic instincts, and the key preconceptions, that lead to us consistently misunderstanding how the world really works. Inspiring and revelatory, Factfulness is a book of stories by a late legend, for anyone who wants to really understand the world.
Truth/knowledge | HC | $26.99

Seafurrers: The Ships’ Cats Who Lapped and Mapped the World
Sandall, Philippa
While the many extraordinary exploits of the seafarers who mapped the world have been well documented, those of their indispensable pest controllers, shipmates, and mascots haven’t – until now. In Seafurrers, Bart the seafaring feline provides us with a cat’s-eye view of maritime history – starting in the Fertile Crescent and Nile Valley and ultimately hopping aboard the ships that set sail for the New World. Drawing on letters, journals, newspaper reports, photographs, and more, Bart acts as both curator and commentator, providing 40 tales of Seafurrers and their swashbuckling owners, including famous seamen such as Sir Richard Hawkins and John Locke. From the gut-wrenching math behind the damage rats could do on ships to the charming pleasures of chasing flying fish, Bart expertly crafts a portrait of feline life on deck, as well as a deft genealogy of cat-human friendship that is sure to leave readers with a newfound appreciation of the cats who helped us at sea, and whom we now helplessly serve at home in return.
Feline seafaring | HC | $24.99

The Secret Barrister: Stories of the Law and How it’s Broken
The Secret Barrister
‘I’m a barrister, a job which requires the skills of a social worker, relationship counsellor, arm twister, hostage negotiator, named driver, bus fare provider, accountant, suicide watchman, coffee supplier, surrogate parent and, on one memorable occasion, whatever the official term is for someone tasked with breaking the news to a prisoner that his girlfriend has been diagnosed with gonorrhoea.’ Welcome to the world of the Secret Barrister. These are the stories of life inside the courtroom. They are sometimes funny, often moving and ultimately life changing. How can you defend a child abuser you suspect to be guilty? What do you say to someone sentenced to ten years who you believe to be innocent? What is the law and why do we need it? And why do they wear those stupid wigs? From the criminals to the lawyers, the victims, witnesses and officers of the law, here is the best and worst of humanity, all struggling within a broken system which would never be off the front pages if the public knew what it was really like. Both a searing first-hand account of the human cost of the criminal justice system, and a guide to how we got into this mess, the Secret Barrister wants to show you what it’s really like and why it really matters.
Legal ethics and professional conduct | TP | $32.99

The Hope Circuit: A Psychologist’s Journey from Helplessness to Optimism
Seligman, Martin
Martin E P Seligman is one of the most decorated and popular psychologists of his generation. When he first encountered the discipline in the 1960s, it was devoted to eliminating misery: the science of how past trauma creates present symptoms. Today, thanks in large part to Seligman’s own work pioneering the Positive Psychology movement, it is ever more focused on the bright side – gratitude, resilience and hope. In this breakthrough memoir, Seligman recounts how he learned to study optimism – including a life-changing conversation with his five-year-old daughter. In wise, eloquent prose, Seligman tells the human stories behind some of his major findings. He recounts developing CAVE, an analytical tool that predicts election outcomes (with shocking accuracy) based on the language used in campaign speeches, and the canonical studies that birthed the theory of learned helplessness – which he now reveals was incorrect. And he writes at length for the first time about his own battles with depression at a young age. All the while, Seligman works out his theory of psychology, making a compelling and deeply personal case for the importance of virtues like hope, anticipation, gratitude and wisdom for our mental health. You will walk away from this book, not just educated but deeply enriched.
Psychology/philosophy | TP | $34.99

What Would Marx Do?: How the greatest political theorists would solve your everyday problems
Southwell, Gareth
When it comes to the really important questions, who better to ask than the greatest political minds in history, with What Would Marx Do? Using 40 everyday questions and problems as springboards for exploring the great political questions of our time, this book will give you a crash course in political philosophy, and an introduction to the theories and ideas of the greatest political philosophers of all time. Includes questions such as: Should I bother to vote? Who should look after the baby? Do you earn enough? My car has just been stolen! But can I hold the thieves responsible? Should I watch what I say on Twitter? Should your children benefit from your success? Is it wrong to want a bigger house? With quirky illustrations and intriguing and original takes on the biggest (and smallest) everyday questions, What Would Marx Do? is guaranteed to leave you with a better grasp on political philosophy, and able to discuss Marxism, Libertarian Socialism and Populism, with ease. Also still available: What Would Freud Do? and What Would Nietzsche Do? (PBK, $22.99 each).
Politics/economics/philosophy | PBK | $22.99

Unscaled: How AI and a New Generation of Upstarts are Creating the Economy of the Future
Taneja, Hemant
Throughout the twentieth century, technology and economics drove a dominant logic: bigger was almost always better. It was smart to scale up – to take advantage of classic economies of scale. But in the unscaled economy, size and scale have become a liability. Today’s most successful companies – Uber, Airbnb, Amazon, Salesforce – have defied the traditional ‘economies of scale’ approach by renting scale instead of spending vast amounts of money building it. And a new generation of upstarts is using artificial intelligence to automate tasks that once required expensive investment, enabling them to grow big without the bloat of giant organisations. In Unscaled, Hemant Taneja convincingly shows how the unscaled economy is remaking massive, deeply-rooted industries and opening up fantastic possibilities for entrepreneurs, imaginative companies and resourceful individuals. Beyond that, it can be the model for solving some of the world’s greatest problems, including climate change and soaring healthcare costs, potentially reversing many of the ills brought on by mass industrialisation. The unscale wave has only just started. To succeed in business today, companies, CEOs and leaders everywhere must unlearn what they have been taught – they must embrace an unscaled mindset.
Business management | TP | $32.99

Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Have Cornered Culture and What It Means for All of Us
Taplin, Jonathan
‘The question isn’t who’s going to let me: it’s who is going to stop me.’ Google. Amazon. Facebook. The modern world is defined by vast digital monopolies turning ever-larger profits. Those of us who consume the content that feeds them are farmed for the purposes of being sold ever more products and advertising. Those that create the content – the artists, writers and musicians – are finding they can no longer survive in this unforgiving economic landscape. But it didn’t have to be this way. This is the story of how a small number of ideologically driven libertarians took the utopian ideal of the internet and turned it into the copyright-mauling, competition-destroying, human-hating nightmare it has become. Their revolution began with a simple premise: to conquer the world, they would steal the value of art (as well as the value of everything else of importance to human beings) from its creators. It is the story of a massive reallocation of revenue in which $50 billion a year has moved from the creators and owners of content to the monopoly platforms. And if you think that’s got nothing to do with you, their next move is to come after your jobs.
Information technology/social ethics | PBK | $18.99

New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World and How to Make it Work For You
Timms, Henry & Heimans, Jeremy
In this indispensable guide to navigating the 21st century, two visionary thinkers reveal the unexpected ways power is changing – and how ‘new power’ is reshaping politics, business and life. Why do some leap ahead while others fall behind in today’s chaotic, connected age? In New Power, Australian Jeremy Heimans and Brit Henry Timms confront the biggest stories of our time – the rise of mega-platforms like Facebook and Uber; the out-of-nowhere victories or Presidents Barak Obama and Donald Trump; the unexpected emergence of movements like #BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo; and the eruption of darker forces such as ISIS. For most of human history, the rules of power were clear: power was something to be seized and jealously guarded. This ‘old power’ was inaccessible to the vast majority of people. But widespread connectivity has made possible a different kind of power. ‘New power’ is made by the many rather than the few. It is open, participatory, and peer driven. It works like a current, not a currency – and like water or electricity, it is most forceful when it surges. In a world increasingly shaped by new power, this revelatory book gives each of us a new way to understand the world and our role in it.
Society and culture | TP | $32.99

The Vaccine Race: How Scientists Used Human Cells to Combat Killer Viruses
Wadman, Meredith
The epic and controversial story of a major breakthrough in cell biology that led to the conquest of rubella and other devastating diseases. Until the late 1960s, tens of thousands of children suffered crippling birth defects if their mothers had been exposed to rubella, popularly known as German measles, while pregnant. There was no vaccine and little understanding of how the disease devastated foetuses. In June 1962, a young biologist in Philadelphia produced the first safe, clean cells that made possible the mass-production of vaccines against many common childhood diseases. Two years later, in the midst of a German measles epidemic, his colleague developed the vaccine that would one day effectively wipe out rubella for good. This vaccine – and others made with those cells – have since protected hundreds of millions of people worldwide, the vast majority of them preschool children. Meredith Wadman’s account of this great leap forward in medicine is a fascinating and revelatory read.
Medical research/immunology | PBK | $24.99

The Inner Life of Animals: Surprising Observations of a Hidden World
Wohlleben, Peter
Can horses feel shame? Do deer grieve? Why do roosters deceive hens? We tend to assume that we are the only living things able to experience feelings; but have you ever wondered what’s going on in an animal’s head? From the leafy forest floor to the inside of a bee hive, The Inner Life of Animals opens up the animal kingdom like never before. We hear the stories of a grateful humpback whale, of a hedgehog who has nightmares, and of a magpie who commits adultery; we meet bees that plan for the future, pigs who learn their own names and crows that go tobogganing for fun. And at last we find out why wasps exist.
Zoology/Natural world | PBK | $19.99

Artificial Intelligence (Ladybird Expert)
Woolridge, Michael
A clear, simple and entertaining introduction to intelligent machines and the humans that program them. Written by computer scientist Michael Wooldridge, Artificial Intelligence chronicles the development of intelligent machines, from Turing’s dream of machines that think, to today’s digital assistants like Siri and Alexa. AI is not something that awaits us in the future. Inside, you’ll learn how we have come to rely on embedded AI software and what a world of ubiquitous AI might look like.
Artificial intelligence | HC | $19.99